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All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #335804 (stock #BA301)
Stonegate Antiques
$45.00
Measuring 3 inches high, this delightfully sweet, circa 1940’s, black bisque baby boy is in mint condition! Excellent paint, with not a chip or flake to be found! Dressed in painted blue shorts and white shirt, this little darling even retains his three, original yarn pigtails! Incised on back: JAPAN. A very, very charming piece of vintage Black Memorabilia!
All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #560844 (stock #BA627A)
Stonegate Antiques
$14.00
While the photo depicts a grouping of 3 different, vintage 1930-40's, French Rum labels, only the oval label is available at $14.00, as the other 2 have been sold.

The label is unused and is in excellent condition with wonderful, even coloring (any appearance of fading is due to light reflection only).

Approximate measurements: the oval label measures 4.50 x 3.50 inches.

Would look wonderful framed!!

Please take a moment to view my other grouping of vintage French rum labels!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1273736 (stock #BA874, BA919)
Stonegate Antiques
$225.00
Measuring 9 inches high, these delightful examples of Folk Art styling, are two of a series of Black cloth character dolls made in Alabama in the 1930’s by unknown craftsmen/women. It has been speculated that their creation was encouraged through President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's Depression era program, the Work Projects Administration (WPA), in existence from 1936-1940.

The female doll depicts a black mammy out for a stroll with black umbrella in hand. This gentlewoman wears a red and white polka dot kerchief on her head covering most of her gray hair and has embroidered facial features – characteristic of these dolls. Also characteristic of this type of doll is a small square of asphalt shingle glued to the feet to serve as a stand. This doll has (not uncommonly) lost hers long ago, but a bit of the original shingle is still attached to the soles of both shoes. Clothing, with the exception of her neutral-striped knit-fabric sweater, is machine-sewn cotton with careful detailing right down to the red hankie poking out of her apron pocket. She also wears gold hoop earrings! Her body, which is well-stuffed to be anatomically correct, is black cotton fabric stuffed with cotton batting.

The white haired and bearded male country gentleman doll is similarly attired in machine-sewn cotton britches with a patch at the knee and suspenders along with a tan cotton striped shirt and red kerchief around his neck. His hat is constructed of cranberry-colored felt. Under his right arm, he holds a nicely crafted chicken that has sustained a tiny bit of fabric loss to its face. His left arm once held a wooden walking stick which is long gone, but alternatively, he now uses his free hand to hold the arm of his lovely lady! His asphalt shingle is also missing with remnants evident of it present on the soles of his shoes.

Two very special dolls that represent a snapshot of history, capturing the lives of poor southern black folk of the Depression era.

The dolls are priced at $225.00 each, or they may both be purchased as a pair at the discounted price of $395.00. Please note that no further advertised discount is applicable to this special paired pricing offer.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #1208317 (stock #B286)
Stonegate Antiques
$425.00
Presented as an historical and cultural artifact, this seldom-found, vintage, 1942, Ten Little Colored Boys book illustrated by Emery I. Gondor and published by Howell, Soskin Publishers, New York, is in very good condition.

Measuring 10.75 inches wide x 8.25 inches long, the book has seen gentle use as evidenced by the fairly good condition of the little boys' heads which, while providing visual interest, are primarily present to allow easy turning of each page. Given this purpose, neck creasing and edge wear is expected and evident. Corner and edge wear of front and back boards is present, as is a brown oval stain on the front board near the word "little". Front and back covers are constructed of heavy cardboard, the pages of heavier stock paper. Both the front and back boards evidence age discoloration and some foxing, and a bit of vintage staining from handling on the back board.

The book retains its brilliant, bright, crayon-box-like colors. The book has ten pages with alternating color and black and white illustrations as noted in photos. I did not have sufficient space to post photos of all pages, but those present are representative of overall condition. Some pages evidence foxing, but all pages are free of rips and creasing. The binding is tight and the book retains its original, red, binding spiral.

Originally published in 1868 under the Title of “The Ten Little Indians,” this poem was used during minstrel shows, which oftentimes were traveling acts, performed by white actors in blackface following the Civil War. The following year, the poem was adapted to this overtly horrid, racist rendition, replacing the word Indians with “Nigger” in both minstrel shows, printed sheet music, and children’s nursery rhyme books. This version married the stereotypes of violence and ignorance within the African-American population with the intent of villainizing freed black males while simultaneously allowing violence acts to befall the black characters portrayed in the rhyme.

This 1942 version having changed the derogatory term nigger to that of colored (equally derogatory), also depicts a somewhat tempered portrayal of the violence befalling the characters as compared to earlier versions of the rhyme.

The poem:
Ten little colored boys sitting in a line; one slid off the roof, then there were nine.
Nine little colored boys fished with worms for bait; one fell in the river, then there were eight.
Eight little colored boys flying up to heaven; one tried to parachute, then there were seven.
Seven little colored boys doing circus tricks; one teased an elephant, then there were six.
Six little colored boys found honey in a hive; one tried to pet a bee, then there were five.
Five little colored boys heard a lion roar; One didn't run in time, then there were four.
Four little colored boys started out to ski; One hit a snowman, then there were three.
Three little colored boys cooked some chicken stew; One ate the pot-ful, then there were two.
Two little colored boys playing with a gun; Thought it wasn't loaded, then there was one.
One little colored boy thought it would be fun to settle down and marry, then there was none.
He had a family of colored boys and then, before very long, there were ten of them again.

To view other versions of this book presently available for separate purchase, please type the words "ten little" into the SEARCH box on our home page.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #807814 (stock #BA840)
Stonegate Antiques
$395.00
Measuring 8 inches long x 4 1/2 inches wide x 4 inches high, this colorful, 1920's, tin lithographed, wind-up toy featuring a Black Native Riding a Turtle is quite visually appealing!!

In very nice condition with minor scratches to paint here and there as seen in photos, this wind-up toy works, but the mechanism does have the tendency to stick a little. Marked J. Chein.

A must-have for the avid Black Memorabilia Toy collector!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1910 item #877741 (stock #BAFolder)
Stonegate Antiques
$45.00
Measuring approximately 4.5 x 6.5 inches, this circa 1900 souvenir postcard folder is entitled, "Souvenir Folder of the Sunny South, The Land of King Cotton". It was printed by Curt Telch & Co., Chicago, Illinois.

The folder is undated and was never mailed. Some edge wear evident at corners and some slight separation at the seams of individual cards. While some photos may appear a bit blurry, this is a function of photography and not condition. All postcards are crisp and clear!

The Real Photo postcard folder features the lyrics of "Dixieland" and 18 full color scenes of industry common in the South during this period: cotton picking and production, tapping pine trees for turpentine production, watermelon farming, Razorback Hog farming and sugarcaning. All photos feature African-American laborers.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #837206 (stock #BA729)
Stonegate Antiques
$325.00
Offered is a wonderful 19th century, antique, papier mache and wooden black mammy doll manufactured during the late 1800s. The doll has no markings to indicate the manufacturer, but it features a papier mache head with a wooden torso, arms, and legs. The face is hand-painted with wonderful detail, and it includes all of its original clothing which consists of a dress, apron, and kerchief. Overall the doll stands a diminutive 5 1/2" tall.

The overall condition of the doll is quite good. It remains in all original condition. The papier mache head is solid with no chips, cracks, or broken areas, and the hand-painted details are strong with little to no loss. The torso is solid and the arms are attached with no breaks. The legs have some damage to the wood. They have split near the top and have some small wood loss, thus, are held securely in place with a string that has been tied to them. The wooden center dowels are still present, however, and they can be repaired if so desired. The clothing is all original and is still in nice condition with no tears or holes, only some light fading and discoloration from age.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #375596 (stock #BA470)
Stonegate Antiques
$345.00
This extremely rare cross stitch sampler of a young black boy with hands placed on his hips is dated to at least circa 1890, although it is quite likely an earlier example of 19th century needlework making it highly scarce and sought after.

Completed in silk thread on early, thick, pressed paper canvas, the diminutive, 1 5/8 x 2 3/4 inch piece of needlework remains stitched onto the original, 1 ¾ x 8 inch long, deep red satin banding. Standing on deep red ground, the black boy wears pale green and black striped clothing.

This wonderful, early piece of Black Americana needlework remains in excellent, original condition. At some point in time, a previous owner matted and framed the piece to allow for both ease of display and protection; however, to meet archival requirements, the piece requires a replacement of its current cardboard backing, and spacer bars separating the needlework from the glass should be added. Framed measurements are 4.5 inches wide x 11 inches long.

A phenomenally rare piece for the advanced Black Memorabilia collector!

It is difficult to photograph glass without reflection- please note that any aberrations are reflections only.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #560336 (stock #BA613)
Stonegate Antiques
$95.00
This vintage 1920's Austrian cast iron figure group is an authentic piece that was carefully hand-painted long ago. The darling boy and girl seated on a tree stump measures 2 3/8 inches high. With the exception of the girl's missing right leg, this seldom found piece is in overall fine condition with age-related paint scrapes here and there. A very unusual and interesting figure group that displays exceedingly well! Please see the other African-American cast iron figures available for purchase!
All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1920 item #854519 (stock #BA290)
Stonegate Antiques
$35.00
Offered are five different 78 RPM records featuring JIM CROW era, minstrel music of the 1900-1920's. All five records come with their original paper jackets. They are priced at $30 each, or all five may be purchased for $120.00 firm.

The records are in used condition with minor scuffing and/or scratching typical of used records of 80+ years of age. These records have not been recently played and are presented as historical artifacts, and as such, they are offered for sale without guarantee of "playing quality".

Offered are:

1912 "I'se Gwine Back to Dixie" by the Haydn Quartet

1923 "Two Black Crows Part 1 and Part 2" A Comedy Sketch by Moran and Mack

C1915 "No One Loves You Any Better Than Your Mammy" by Link-Nelson

1908 "Coon Band Contest--Fox Trot" by Earl Fuller's Famous Jazz Band

C1910 "Uncle Tom One-Step" by Hugo Frey.

As each is priced separately (see photos for pricing), please email us stating which item you wish to purchase so that we can customize your order form.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #795232 (stock #BA204)
Stonegate Antiques
$195.00
Measuring a total length of 26 inches including strings, this fabulous, late 1940's, black character marionette is in wonderful, never-played-with condition!

The puppet, itself, is 14 inches tall and is colorfully dressed in blue and white checked pants, red shoes, orange and whit polka dot shirt, straw hat and red patterned neck scarf.

The puppet's face is composition and bears evidence of some age-related crackling as noted in photos. He has a tiny piece if composition missing on the left side of his neck partially covered by his neck scarf, so it is very difficult to notice. He bears a manufacturer stamp on the bottom of his right foot, but it is partial and unreadable. His hands which hold colorful pink straw maracas are a heavy molded plastic.

The puppet is free of stains, dirt and odor. He retains his original black strings and wooden airplane controller!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #1265967 (stock #BA911)
Stonegate Antiques
$150.00
Measuring approximately 3" x 3", this rarely found tin mechanical toy features a monkey at the unfortunate mercy of a black lady hitting him with a mallet!

Unmarked, the toy was likely produced in post WWII Germany. It is in wonderful, barely-used condition with just the tiniest degree of scratching wherever metal rubs metal during toy movement. To operate the toy, one simply squeezes the metal lever on the back, which causes the woman to hit the poor monkey on the head with a mallet!

A RARE toy with crisp color and which displays wonderfully!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1920 item #428076 (stock #BA525)
Stonegate Antiques
$625.00
Having conceived of the revolutionary idea of a lithographed, molded-mask doll face in 1901, New Yorker, Albert Bruckner applied for and was awarded the patent for his idea that same year. All Bruckner dolls were then stamped, "PAT'D JULY 8th 1901" on the lower right neck edge.

From 1901-1924, Bruckner produced this original, 12" Topsy Turvy doll for Horsman's Babyland Rag Doll line that features Caucasian, "Betty", on one end and African American, "Topsy", on the other. The inspiration for this doll is based on the character of Topsy in Harriet Beecher Stowe's classic 1852 novel, "Uncle Tom's Cabin".

The Bruckner Topsy Turvy doll was advertised in a 1907 Babyland Rag Doll catalog as follows:

"TOPSY-TURVY---What is this?
Looks like just a pretty miss.
But turn her over and you'll find,
She is quite another kind.
First she's White and then she's Black,
Turn her over and turn her back.
Topsy that side--Betty this--
Yet complete, each little Miss."

The detail on this hard to find classic doll is lovely. Both heads indeed have the pressed, molded mask faces with lithographed features. Topsy's face is in mint condition! Betty's face is very fine with superficial rubs to the flesh-toned coating of her mask; her lithographed facial features, however, remain beautiful. (Such rubs are not unexpected as these particular doll masks are, unfortunately, prone to rubbing.)

Grinning Topsy has red bows tied to her black mohair braided pigtails which are tucked into her red headscarf. Her red blouse, which matches her head scarf, is trimmed with cream banding around the sleeve and neck edges. The cream scarf she wears around her shoulders tucks into her very full, red/cream checked, gingham skirt. Flip her over, and....

Betty's more subtle Anglo face and her hair are lithographed. She wears the same red/cream checked gingham fabric of which both her dress and ruffled bonnet are constructed. Over her very full gingham dress, Betty also wears a sheer, ruffled pinafore.

Both dolls have the typical "mitten" hands of the stuffed rag dolls of this era. There are no other difficulties to report other than the rubs to Betty's face and some tiny, stray (original) glue spots here and there. No rips, tears, soiling, or odors, and she has been stored in a smoke-free home. The photos show it all- these two girls are a charming pair! A very difficult to find doll in near excellent condition!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1244288 (stock #BA897)
Stonegate Antiques
$695.00
Measuring 9-7/8 tall x 13-1/2 inches wide, this extraordinarily rare, Jim Crow era, segregation sign advertises a "colored-only" hotel, Coleman's of Ashland, Virginia.

Constructed of cardboard with black printing, this circa 1930-40's sign reads: " Coleman's Hotel Colored. Special Attention to Tourists. Ashland Virginia".

The sign remains in all-original condition inclusive of minor discoloration as noted in photos and small chips to the upper right and lower left corners. Print source is noted: "Herald-Progress Print, Ashland, VA".

This is NOT a reproduction, but rather a fortunate preservation. It is quite amazing that this sign has survived the many years being constructed out of cardboard. It was clearly stored away in such a manner that preserved its original condition.

Travel for African Americans during the Jim Crow period was difficult and complicated, with limited options for eating, sleeping, even procuring gasoline for the car. As a result, black-owned hotels and motels placed signs such as this one prominently in their windows. There were even special travel-guides to help African Americans plan their trips, hopefully, without incident. Victor Green's "Green Guide" provided state by state lists of colored hotels, motels and other travel-related businesses that catered to African-Americans.

Quite possibly the ONLY sign remaining extant from this particular, racially segregated establishment. An historically significant piece!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #1216421 (stock #BA869)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Once part of the Middle Passage Museum benefactor's inventory, these authentic and extraordinarily RARE, Slave Ship shackles have been de-accessioned from the personal collection of the museum's anonymous Georgia benefactor who is cited below.

These iron, hand-forged, 19th century slave ship shackles were purchased back in the early 1960’s out of a family estate in New Orleans, Louisiana, whose 18th and 19th century ancestors were involved in the slave trade. The shackles remain all-original and untouched with fifteen very heavy chain links that vary in size, measuring a total of 40 inches in length when positioned in a straight line. The cuff size is enormous with diameter measurements of 4.75 and 4.25 inches each; the heft and weight of each cuff is quite impressive. This very weighty set was designed to immobilize when the two circular links were attached to another locking shackle on the interior wall of the ship. An utterly horrible, tangible testament to the malevolence of slavery.

The anonymous museum benefactor from Georgia kept this particular set aside from those items he had planned to donate to the Middle Passage Museum due to the rarity in opportunity of acquiring slave ship shackles---the only set he acquired in his many years of collecting which began in the early 1950's before the collectible field of Black Americana was popular or even socially or politically acceptable.

Also currently offered for sale and priced separately are a rarely found, 19thC Slave Rattle Shackle out of the Charleston, South Carolina area and a set of early 19th century, child/young adolescent - size, Slave Crab Rattle Shackles. Please type the word "shackles" in the search box on our home page to find these sets of shackles.

The Middle Passage Museum was the dream of Jim and Mary Anne Petty of Mississippi as well as that of an anonymous Georgian benefactor who had together compiled a collection of slave artifacts numbering over 15,000 pieces and who had hoped to find a permanent site in Mobile, Alabama, for their museum. While they formed a non-profit organization to raise funds for their hoped-for museum, their dream was never realized.

In a 2003 statement, Jim Petty remarked, "The importance of the exhibit of these artifacts is to understand the harshness of what slavery and segregation was all about. The items in the exhibit remind us of the terrible heinousness of slavery. Viewing the collection can be very emotional, but it is a tool through which we can understand, honor and respect a great culture. We want to realize that out of slavery, a great culture emerged, and carried on, and continued to strive for a better life regardless of the adverse conditions that were placed upon them."

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #264032 (stock #BA930)
Stonegate Antiques
$175.00
Increasingly more and more difficult to find, this pot metal pencil sharpener was made in pre-WWII Germany in the 1930's.

Measuring 1.5 inches long x 1 inch wide, this sharpener depicts a derogatory caricature of a Black Man. The glaring eyes are painted a stark white with teeny black pupils, while the red painted lips surround the pencil sharpener blade which takes the place of the man's teeth. Curly molded hair and eyebrows are painted black, while the face is painted brown- inside and out.

The pencil sharpener is stamped GERMANY on the back inside.

Condition is very good with approximately 75% (a conservative estimate) of the original paint remaining. There is no repaint! The paint is worn in expected areas, with the majority of paint wear seen on the sides of the face and bottom of the chin where one would grasp the sharpener. Facial feature paint is strong.

Germany apparently made a good steel blade as the sharpener still works!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #283921 (stock #BA402)
Stonegate Antiques
$395.00
This handsome Black Memorabilia Male Golliwogg doll comes straight from an English home!

A brief history of the Golliwog doll: The Golliwog is based on a Black minstrel doll that the Victorian era illustrator, Florence Kate Upton, born in 1873 of English parents, had played with as a small child in New York. Upton's Golliwog character was first introduced to the world in her 1895 book entitled The Adventures of Two Dutch Dolls. Like the rag doll that inspired it, the Golliwog in her book was an ugly creature with very dark, jet black skin, large white-rimmed eyes, red clown lips, and wild, frizzy hair. Golliwogs are typically male and are generally dressed in a jacket, trousers, bow tie, and stand-up collar in a combination of red, white, blue, black, and occasionally yellow colors.

Measuring 21.5 inches long, this delightful and appealing cloth Golli is unmarked and is thought, by his original and quite elderly owner, to have been made in the mid 1940's! (She speculates that he could even be a bit older than that, but she remembers not acquiring him until after the end of WWII.)

His nose and mouth are hand-stitched and he has round, cloth covered button eyes- the pupils were hand-colored using black ink! His nicely coiffed, black hair appears to have been styled from soft, "stuffed animal-type" fur! Rather interesting and ingenious! He has a machine-stitched, cotton batting stuffed, black sock cloth body. His colorful wardrobe is also machine stitched- green wool mourning coat, gold vest, and red and white polka-dotted cotton pants and matching bow tie!

He is in wonderful condition with the exception of some tiny moth holes to the back of his mourning coat (see photos) as well as another tiny moth hole to the back of his right arm and back right pants leg. The polka dot clothing shows the slightest hint of fading. His dark black fur hair also shows some age-related color change to brown at the roots. Hmm...then again...perhaps he's simply overdue for another hair coloring appointment at the Salon!

A very sweet addition to one's Black Memorabilia or Golliwogg collection!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #1065633 (stock #BA794)
Stonegate Antiques
$295.00
Measuring 6 1/4 inches high x 3 3/4 inches wide, this circa 1950's, Japan made, Polka Dot, Mammy String Holder is in very fine condition! Mammy has expected crazing to surface with two very tight hairlines that start at the backside of the piece and feather slightly toward Mammy’s two shoulders about ½ inch. At the lower base of the back is another tight hairline that remains on the back side of the piece only, not extending toward the front of the piece. It rests beside a tiny, darkened, superficial flake which also is not visible when Mammy is placed on a shelf or hung on the wall.

The String Holder is stamped "JAPAN" and “Theo Hinode” on the inside of the base (The Hinode Company is the Japanese Ceramic Company.). Mammy has a hole in the center of her chest area, just above her folded hands, to accommodate the string which would be pulled from the ball of string placed inside her body from the back of the piece. This wonderful piece even comes complete with vintage hanging string---Mammy has two holes at the back of her head to accommodate this! The entire piece is glazed with the exception of Mammy's red kerchief which is cold-painted (meaning that the paint was applied after firing). As such, this area of paint would be the most vulnerable to wear, and Mammy does have some “bald areas” where the paint has come off her kerchief. Please take a moment to view all photos to ascertain condition and appeal of this fabulous and functional, vintage string holder!

A lovely and colorful piece that can be displayed on a shelf or hanging from the wall!