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All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #1209364 (stock #BA861AB)
Stonegate Antiques
$325.00
Offered are two, highly-collectible, circa 1860-70's, earthenware, pictorial plates featuring two scenes from the enormously popular, 1852, novel, Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe. Each plate is priced separately at $325.00 each.

One plate depicts the sale of Uncle Tom while the other plate depicts the death of little Eva. The text on each plate is in German: "Evas Todt" or in English, "The Death of Eva", and "Slavel Tom Von LeGree Gekauft" or in English, "The Slave Tom Purchased by (Simon} LeGree".

Produced for use by children as subtle educational tools, the plates measure 7 5/8 inches in diameter and are decorated with black transfer, printed, Uncle Tom vignettes.

The condition of both plates is quite superb with subtle crazing lightly evident on the backs of plates only. Also on the backs of each plate are tiny, factory-flaw imperfections where glazing failed to bind to the earthenware (represented in close-up photo). The "Sale of Uncle Tom" plate has three such imperfections on its back side along with a tiny area of bleeding of transfer color under the glaze (see close-up photo). The "Death of Eva" plate displays more evident crazing on the back as compared to the "Sale of Tom" plate along with three factory-flaw imperfections, as described above. The "Eva" plate also appears to have three, extremely fine, light, scratch lines running across the front of the plate that are most readily noticeable only in close-up photos; when one runs a finger along the lines, the imperfections are so fine that they cannot be felt and certainly represent no threat to structural integrity.

The plates were produced by the Schramberg Pottery of Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany, founded in 1820 by stoneware expert, Isidor Faist. The plate featuring the sale of Uncle Tom is impressed "Schramberg" while the other plate has no marking. It is evident, however, that both plates were manufactured by the Schramberg factory.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1920 item #428076 (stock #BA525)
Stonegate Antiques
$625.00
Having conceived of the revolutionary idea of a lithographed, molded-mask doll face in 1901, New Yorker, Albert Bruckner applied for and was awarded the patent for his idea that same year. All Bruckner dolls were then stamped, "PAT'D JULY 8th 1901" on the lower right neck edge.

From 1901-1924, Bruckner produced this original, 12" Topsy Turvy doll for Horsman's Babyland Rag Doll line that features Caucasian, "Betty", on one end and African American, "Topsy", on the other. The inspiration for this doll is based on the character of Topsy in Harriet Beecher Stowe's classic 1852 novel, "Uncle Tom's Cabin".

The Bruckner Topsy Turvy doll was advertised in a 1907 Babyland Rag Doll catalog as follows:

"TOPSY-TURVY---What is this?
Looks like just a pretty miss.
But turn her over and you'll find,
She is quite another kind.
First she's White and then she's Black,
Turn her over and turn her back.
Topsy that side--Betty this--
Yet complete, each little Miss."

The detail on this hard to find classic doll is lovely. Both heads indeed have the pressed, molded mask faces with lithographed features. Topsy's face is in mint condition! Betty's face is very fine with superficial rubs to the flesh-toned coating of her mask; her lithographed facial features, however, remain beautiful. (Such rubs are not unexpected as these particular doll masks are, unfortunately, prone to rubbing.)

Grinning Topsy has red bows tied to her black mohair braided pigtails which are tucked into her red headscarf. Her red blouse, which matches her head scarf, is trimmed with cream banding around the sleeve and neck edges. The cream scarf she wears around her shoulders tucks into her very full, red/cream checked, gingham skirt. Flip her over, and....

Betty's more subtle Anglo face and her hair are lithographed. She wears the same red/cream checked gingham fabric of which both her dress and ruffled bonnet are constructed. Over her very full gingham dress, Betty also wears a sheer, ruffled pinafore.

Both dolls have the typical "mitten" hands of the stuffed rag dolls of this era. There are no other difficulties to report other than the rubs to Betty's face and some tiny, stray (original) glue spots here and there. No rips, tears, soiling, or odors, and she has been stored in a smoke-free home. The photos show it all- these two girls are a charming pair! A very difficult to find doll in near excellent condition!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #706524 (stock #BA670)
Stonegate Antiques
$75.00
Wonderful vintage 1940s hand-made sewing needle case of a little black girl with yellow bows in her braided hair and a pumpkin colored dress. Front of dress lifts up and there are two flaps for storing sewing needles. Very nicely made with fine detailing to face and hair construction--her little curls are tiny French knots. Excellent condition. Measures 6" long by 3" at the widest.
All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #674623 (stock #BA907)
Stonegate Antiques
$575.00
Measuring nearly 8 inches tall, this fabulous and rarely found, early, lithographed, tin toy, No. 1750, retaining its original box, was made by the Lindstrom Tool & Toy Company of Bridgeport, Connecticut.

This late 1930's toy is the later version of the two Mammy walker toys produced by this company. It is marked on back just under the white apron tie, "Lindstrom Corporation Made in USA". The marking is very faint, and thus, difficult to read without scrutiny. The contrast in this photo has been enhanced so that the manufacturer labeling is easier to visualize online.

Mammy shuffles along quite vigorously via her original wind-up mechanism while she holds her broom and quickly "sweeps" back and forth.

Over 70 years old, Mammy is still quite sturdy as she was well made, but she does show some minor scratching and paint loss from play over the years as the photos indicate. Her coloring remains brilliant!

The box remains in very good condition with minimal wear to seams considering its age. Coloring is strong. One flap at the top of the box is detached but present.

Sweeping Mammy is a must-have addition to any Black Memorabilia Toy collection!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #336030 (stock #BA282)
Stonegate Antiques
$125.00
Measuring approximately 4 1/2 inches in length, this wonderful pair of hard plastic African Native dolls are dressed in highly detailed and decorated costumes. Circa 1940s, these all-original dolls with hand-painted faces are in very fine condition and make a striking pair when displayed!

The female is clothed in a green felt dress and head piece that are decorated with tiny blue and white beads. She wears double strand white beaded bracelets and anklets and also wears a double stranded white beaded necklace with a large red bead center. Underneath her dress in back a tiny head peeks out- a little plastic baby that she is carrying!

The male is clothed in a brown and red polka dotted skirt with 2 fur pouches, and a fur headdress. He is swathed in longer strings of beads that encircle his waist and also run diagonally across his chest. He, too, wears a double stranded beaded anklet and necklace. Larger Red beads hang from the sides of his dress as well as from the 2nd fur pouch that hangs behind him.

The arms and legs are movable at hip and shoulder joints of each doll. The Male has the following in raised lettering on his back: P. M. and J. H. B. The remainder of the marking is obscured by beading and clothing. No other markings are visible.

A visually striking pair!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #1266375 (stock #BA917)
Stonegate Antiques
$185.00
Measuring 3 3/4 inches tall, this rarely found, bisque, black baby doll rests in a 6 inch long Peanut!

The little black doll retains its original cloth diaper and swaddling blanket with arm holes. The blanket shows spotted soiling. The baby doll features a nicely hand-painted face with the bisque in excellent condition with the exception of the right foot. The top front of the right foot appears to have been chipped during production as it retains the original paint that is applied over the white bisque during the manufacturing process. The doll is marked on its upper back: "made in Japan".

The 2 piece peanut shell is quite lightweight and appears to be made of layers of heat-pressed paper that was fashioned into a peanut via a mold. The two peanut shells retain the original hinges. A 1 inch long piece of the interior paper liner has separated from the peanut shell, but the separated piece remains (see photo). These delicate peanut shells are in fine condition overall!

Perhaps originally intended as an ornament, the peanut shell still retains a hanging string at its top edge. A rarely found piece of Black Memorabilia!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1127725 (stock #BA824)
Stonegate Antiques
$75.00
Measuring 3 3/4 inches long, this circa 1920-30’s, miniature, Black Mammy doll is unique in construction- its head and body have been fashioned from an old black rubber baby nursing nipple!

Mammy’s sweet little face has been hand-painted, and she has been nicely dressed in a red and white polka dot dress with linen apron and red flowered head scarf. She holds a tiny, plastic, white baby in her left arm who wears a linen gown edged with lace.

Condition of this wonderful miniature Mammy is very good! With the exception of her nipple face which has contorted a bit due to the ravages of time, she is in delightful condition!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #1208317 (stock #B286)
Stonegate Antiques
$425.00
Presented as an historical and cultural artifact, this seldom-found, vintage, 1942, Ten Little Colored Boys book illustrated by Emery I. Gondor and published by Howell, Soskin Publishers, New York, is in very good condition.

Measuring 10.75 inches wide x 8.25 inches long, the book has seen gentle use as evidenced by the fairly good condition of the little boys' heads which, while providing visual interest, are primarily present to allow easy turning of each page. Given this purpose, neck creasing and edge wear is expected and evident. Corner and edge wear of front and back boards is present, as is a brown oval stain on the front board near the word "little". Front and back covers are constructed of heavy cardboard, the pages of heavier stock paper. Both the front and back boards evidence age discoloration and some foxing, and a bit of vintage staining from handling on the back board.

The book retains its brilliant, bright, crayon-box-like colors. The book has ten pages with alternating color and black and white illustrations as noted in photos. I did not have sufficient space to post photos of all pages, but those present are representative of overall condition. Some pages evidence foxing, but all pages are free of rips and creasing. The binding is tight and the book retains its original, red, binding spiral.

Originally published in 1868 under the Title of “The Ten Little Indians,” this poem was used during minstrel shows, which oftentimes were traveling acts, performed by white actors in blackface following the Civil War. The following year, the poem was adapted to this overtly horrid, racist rendition, replacing the word Indians with “Nigger” in both minstrel shows, printed sheet music, and children’s nursery rhyme books. This version married the stereotypes of violence and ignorance within the African-American population with the intent of villainizing freed black males while simultaneously allowing violence acts to befall the black characters portrayed in the rhyme.

This 1942 version having changed the derogatory term nigger to that of colored (equally derogatory), also depicts a somewhat tempered portrayal of the violence befalling the characters as compared to earlier versions of the rhyme.

The poem:
Ten little colored boys sitting in a line; one slid off the roof, then there were nine.
Nine little colored boys fished with worms for bait; one fell in the river, then there were eight.
Eight little colored boys flying up to heaven; one tried to parachute, then there were seven.
Seven little colored boys doing circus tricks; one teased an elephant, then there were six.
Six little colored boys found honey in a hive; one tried to pet a bee, then there were five.
Five little colored boys heard a lion roar; One didn't run in time, then there were four.
Four little colored boys started out to ski; One hit a snowman, then there were three.
Three little colored boys cooked some chicken stew; One ate the pot-ful, then there were two.
Two little colored boys playing with a gun; Thought it wasn't loaded, then there was one.
One little colored boy thought it would be fun to settle down and marry, then there was none.
He had a family of colored boys and then, before very long, there were ten of them again.

To view other versions of this book presently available for separate purchase, please type the words "ten little" into the SEARCH box on our home page.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #383442 (stock #BA484)
Stonegate Antiques
$145.00
Measuring 5 3/4 x 7 3/4, this lovely, 1920's, English or Continental origin, Black subject advertising diecut features two sweet, smiling young girls under a tattered umbrella.

This pleasant diecut is in excellent condition and comes protected in an attractive, walnut-tone decorative frame!

A sweet piece!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1920 item #854536 (stock #BA387)
Stonegate Antiques
$35.00
Offered are four different, circa 1900-1910, Jim Crow era, stereoview cards, priced at $35.00 each or all four cards for $120.00. All are in fine condition, and all but "Waitin Fo De End Man" have a detailed, historical description on the reverse side.

Featured are "Hoeing Rice, South Carolina", "Old Slave Market At St. Augustine, Florida", "Waitin Fo De End Man" (7 Boys Sitting on a Mule), and "Native Cane Grinders in Sunny Florida".

As each is priced separately (see photos for pricing), please email us stating which item you wish to purchase so that we can customize your order form.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1970 item #1413627 (stock #BA946)
Stonegate Antiques
$38.00
Offered is a C1950-60s, vintage package of Zulu Lulu Swizzle Sticks, Novelty Party Bar-ware that has never been opened. The plastic swizzle sticks on a colorful cardboard display remain sealed within their original clear plastic packaging. Never Used! Perfect condition! Measures 11 inches wide x 8.5 inches high.
All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #383458 (stock #BA479)
Stonegate Antiques
$145.00
Measuring 5 1/2 x 7 1/2, this framed piece of early Black Memorabilia features the hardboard cover only (not the complete book) of "The DARKIES' Painting Book"! Cover depicts 2 jauntily stepping Black children. Color is quite vivid in this very visually-striking piece! Protected in a gold-tone, decorative frame. (Please disregard unavoidable reflections in the glass)

Delightful item!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #795143 (stock #BA348,49,5)
Stonegate Antiques
$195.00
This delightful grouping of 3 black Aunt Jemima composition dolls from the 1930s enjoyed an interesting, more recent life as advertising display pieces in an old Vermont Country store!

The 3 dolls were grouped together in a creative display that supported the sale of Aunt Jemima Pancake products! Their costumes are all identical and were hand-stitched and made especially for the planned Aunt Jemima display.

Each of the dolls remain intact inside an encasement of glue and paper wrapping and are attached to home-made, plaster-of-Paris-based, rectangular platforms. The platforms were created in 1958 as is written on the bottom of each base, and the dolls remained in place until the store closed in the early 1980s.

The large doll is 11 inches tall and evidences age-crackling to her composition face and hands; her right hand is actually missing a small piece of composition (see photo). Black hair peeks out from inside her checkered head scarf framing her sweet face!

The doll on the left side is the shortest, measuring 5 3/4 inches high. She is in fine condition and her eyes are placed in an interesting sideward glance.

The doll on the right measures 6 1/4 inches tall. Her composition is in fine condition with the exception to some small loss at the very top of her head (see photo).

Certainly a very visually appealing trio, sold all together as a group of three!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1224370 (stock #BA884)
Stonegate Antiques
$450.00
This fabulous 1930's American Beach cast iron sign reading "AMERICAN BEACH FLA Negro Ocean Playground" is in very fine condition with remnants of original paint and vintage patina. This is NOT a reproduction! This sign was originally sold to be used as a license plate topper by African American folks frequenting this beach. It measures 11 inches in length x 4.50 inches high at its tallest point.

American Beach was established in 1935 on Florida's east coast under the leadership of Abraham Lincoln Lewis, one of seven co-founders of the Afro-American Life Insurance Company, and one of Florida's first black millionaires. His vision was to create a beach resort as a benefit for company executives and as an incentive for employees.

In the era of Jim Crow segregation laws, few public places in Florida or the rest of the South were open to African Americans. From the Depression until well into the 1960's, American Beach served as a holiday and vacation destination for thousands of African Americans, and was a magnet for black celebrities such as entertainers Cab Calloway and Ray Charles, heavyweight boxing champion Joe Louis and writer Zora Neale Hurston.

But in 1964, the area began to decline. Hurricane Dora destroyed much of the beach, and passage of the Civil Rights Act meant that blacks were, finally, no longer restricted to segregated beaches and the businesses that catered to them.

A fabulous and historically relevant piece of Black Americana!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1970 item #1369817 (stock #BA933)
Stonegate Antiques
$35.00
Produced and trademarked as "Brownn Sugarr", this new old stock, plastic, 14oz. bottle of Talcum Powder, distributed by Day Laboratories, Inc., of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, remains completely full and unused. (I have been asked this previously, but no, I do not know whether or not the talcum powder contained herein is the traditional white in color or otherwise.)

As the backside paper label displays a 5 digit zip code, this product was produced in 1963 or later. I purchased this piece from a Texas collector of Black Memorabilia for my own personal collection in about 2007. The seller stated that at one time this product was readily and prolifically available in her area, up until the late 1960s - early 1970s.

The bottle is in very fine condition with age-related creasing to the front paper label as evidenced in the photos.

While newer in age than pieces I typically collect and/or sell, I found this piece to be culturally unique enough to be worthy to collect and then offer for sale. I have never seen another!!!!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1910 item #1157155 (stock #BA833)
Stonegate Antiques
$450.00
Having conceived of the revolutionary idea of a lithographed, molded-mask doll face in 1901, New Yorker, Albert Bruckner applied for and was awarded the patent for his idea that same year. All Bruckner dolls were then stamped, "PAT'D JULY 8th 1901" on the lower right neck edge.

From 1901-1924, Bruckner produced this original, 12" Topsy Turvy doll for Horsman's Babyland Rag Doll line that features Caucasian, "Betty", on one end and African American, "Topsy", on the other. The inspiration for this doll is based on the character of Topsy in Harriet Beecher Stowe's classic 1852 novel, "Uncle Tom's Cabin".

The Bruckner Topsy Turvy doll was advertised in a 1907 Babyland Rag Doll catalog as follows:

"TOPSY-TURVY---What is this?
Looks like just a pretty miss.
But turn her over and you'll find,
She is quite another kind.
First she's White and then she's Black,
Turn her over and turn her back.
Topsy that side--Betty this--
Yet complete, each little Miss."

The detail on this hard to find classic doll is lovely. Both heads indeed have the pressed, molded mask faces with lithographed features. Topsy's face is in mint condition! Betty's face is also in excellent condition with no superficial rubs to the flesh-toned coating of her mask; her lithographed facial features remain just beautiful!! (Such rubs are not unexpected as these particular doll masks are, unfortunately, very prone to rubbing. To find one of these 100+ year old dolls without such rubbing is quite rare!)

Grinning Topsy has red bows tied to her black mohair braided pigtails which are tucked into her red headscarf. Her red blouse, which matches her head scarf, is trimmed with cream banding around the sleeve and neck edges. The cream scarf she wears around her shoulders tucks into her very full, red/cream checked, gingham skirt. Topsy’s cream banding is lightly soiled and there is also some subtle fading to her red head scarf, most notably in the back. Flip her over, and....

Betty's more subtle Anglo face and her hair are lithographed. She wears the same red/cream checked gingham fabric of which both her dress and ruffled bonnet are constructed. Over her very full gingham dress, Betty should also wear a sheer, ruffled, white pinafore, however, it has been lost over time. Betty’s cream banding around each sleeve is also lightly soiled as are her hands.

Both dolls have the typical "mitten" hands of the stuffed rag dolls of this era. There are no other difficulties to report other than some tiny, stray (original) glue spots here and there. No rips, tears, or odors, and she has been stored in a smoke-free home. The 1901 Patent Bruckner Topsy Turvy doll typically carries a $650+ dollar price tag, but deductions to price have been levied to account for the minor imperfections that are noted in this doll.

The photos show it all- these two girls are a charming pair! A very difficult to find doll in such wonderful condition!

Also offered for sale is a COMPLETE 1901 Patent Bruckner Topsy Turvy doll with absolutely no soiling or fading. To view, simply type Bruckner into the SEARCH box on our homepage.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #334052 (stock #BA31)
Stonegate Antiques
$18.00
Measuring approximately 3 1/4 inches long x 2 1/4 inch wide x 1 1/8 inches deep, this vintage, sweetly depicted, steam-molded Brown Doll Face from the 1930’s has never been used! Eyes and lips are both hand-painted; condition is quite fine with no stains, tears, or discoloration—ready to be used!
All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1150519 (stock #BA827)
Stonegate Antiques
$125.00
Measuring 1 7/8 inches in diameter x 1/4 of an inch high, this seldom-found, circa 1920’s, dexterity game depicts a surprised or startled African baby. Likely German-made, the puzzle has no markings. It contains the 3 tiny metal balls, that with the proper manual dexterity, are to be placed in the baby’s mouth and two eyes. Two of the balls are currently fixed in place, likely due to the metal backing being very subtly pushed in.

Constructed of tin with tin back and a cardboard lithographed image and a glass cover, the puzzle is in all-original condition with some tiny crimps to the edges as noted in photos. (Please disregard any light or shiny spots in photos which are due to flash reflection off of the glass.)

An interesting image and a delightful piece of early Black Memorabilia!