Black Memorabilia Drug Store Pharmacy Medical Apothecary Stonegate Antiques Stonegate Antiques
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All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #808062 (stock #BA727)
Stonegate Antiques
$575.00
An extraordinarily RARE 19th CENTURY piece of Black Americana advertising featuring a fabulous graphic of 2 young African American painters holding a "White-Wash Boy's Hydrated Lime" box.

This product was produced by the lime manufacturers, Hatmaker and Place, of Canaan, Connecticut, in the late 1800s. This small company was located within a large "lime belt" that stretched from Connecticut to Vermont. Back in the day, lime powder mixed with water was quite commonly used to "white wash" or paint numerous surfaces, and it was also used as a medicinal disinfectant! The manufacture of lime from marble was one of the earliest and most successful mineral industries in Connecticut, with historical records dating the establishment of the first CT lime manufactory to 1722.

Given its age and the fragility of paper, condition of this wonderful box is quite good. The lower portion of the back side of the box evidences light surface wear with some of the printing on the lower portion of the box worn away as a result. The front of the box has a 3.25 inch long tear which resulted in the loss of the lime powder from the box.

This early piece of Black Americana advertising is EXCEEDINGLY RARE and may well be a ONE-OF-A-Kind item! The Hatmaker and Place Company was one of a number of very small manufactories located within the "lime belt" that were ALL bought out and immediately closed down by a wealthy group of investors who then created and incorporated the mammoth monopoly, The New England Lime Company, early in 1902.

This fabulous piece of Black Americana is NOT to be missed by the serious collector!

All Items : Estate Jewelry : Gold : Victorian : Pre 1900 item #428937 (stock #G355)
Stonegate Antiques
$95.00
Measuring just one inch in length, this pink gold, vintage Victorian Lavalier is straight from an estate filled with vintage jewelry. Likely gold-filled as no marking can be found, this very sweet piece is heart-shaped with a tiny diamond chip in its center and further accented by a single round pearl and a dangling fresh water pearl. Quite lovely and delicate!
All Items : Vintage Arts : Instruments and Implements : Medical : Pre 1920 item #1371035 (stock #DrJ20)
Stonegate Antiques
$35.00
Up for your consideration is a choice pair of cased surgical scalpels, circa 1910. Made of stainless steel and in excellent condition, these neat instruments measure 5.2" in length. Together they fit perfectly into their fitted metal case.

The case measures 6.25"L x 1.2" W and is in very good condition. The case show evidence of minimal tarnish and the faint imperfections of an older instrument.

Ready for your showcase!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #1209250 (stock #BA859)
Stonegate Antiques
$965.00
De-accessioned from the inventory of the ill-fated Middle Passage Museum (see museum history below), this very unusual, 19th century, estate document from Sumter County, Georgia is offered for sale, the purpose of which was to itemize and execute a division of property from the estate of the deceased, southern, plantation owner.

This is a partial document missing its beginning and end pages, therefore, the name of the deceased slave owner and the date of the document is not known. HOWEVER, the document remains EXTRAORDINARILY RARE AND UNUSUAL as it proceeds to, first, categorize the 40 slaves using the word SLAVES instead of Negroes, and secondly, proceeds to list the male slaves BY NAME, ALONG WITH NAMES OF THEIR WIVES AND THEIR CHILDREN, with monetary value listed in the right column of the document!!!! In two instances, the number of years married is also listed! Children are labeled "Girl, "Boy", or "Infant". Total value of these 40 slaves was calculated at $24,200.00

Such documents listing ENTIRE SLAVE FAMILIES BY NAME is simply not found, as slaves were viewed as property, not individuals with rights and privileges who had wives and children, the whole of which, constituted a family. It would indeed be a phenomenal piece of history to be able to identify the plantation and/or deceased slave owner as such an estate listing speaks to an uncommon, albeit, rare and unique perspective of slave ownership. Such a listing makes this particular document all the more heart-wrenching, and it certainly begs the very sad question of whether or not these slave families were allowed to remain united and intact once the final estate disposition was conducted.

The document measures approximately 8 1/2 inches wide x 14 1/8 inches long, is double-sided and is in good condition, with fold lines evident along with some age-related foxing at top and bottom fold lines. 1 3/4 tear along the fold line of the top fold at right edge. The ink color is sepia toned (likely as a result of some fading over time) on a pale blue, vertically-ruled, heavy paper. This phenomenal piece of cultural ephemera is ready for appropriate archival preservation/framing.

The listing of slaves is on the back side of the document with the front side listing farm animals, equipment and supplies along with values- "The following property set apart for the use and benefit of the farm".

The Middle Passage Museum was the dream of Jim and Mary Anne Petty of Mississippi as well as that of an anonymous Georgian benefactor who had together compiled a collection of slave artifacts numbering over 15,000 pieces and who had hoped to find a permanent site in Mobile, Alabama, for their museum. While they formed a non-profit organization to raise funds for their hoped-for museum, their dream was never realized.

In a 2003 statement, Jim Petty remarked, "The importance of the exhibit of these artifacts is to understand the harshness of what slavery and segregation was all about. The items in the exhibit remind us of the terrible heinousness of slavery. Viewing the collection can be very emotional, but it is a tool through which we can understand, honor and respect a great culture. We want to realize that out of slavery, a great culture emerged, and carried on, and continued to strive for a better life regardless of the adverse conditions that were placed upon them."

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #596309 (stock #BA641A)
Stonegate Antiques
$75.00
This is an authentic signed baseball from former Negro League baseball player Luther "Luke" Atkinson. The ball was signed at an autograph show in March 2006. Luther "Luke" Atkinson was #20, a stand-out performer for the Wilson, North Carolina All Stars, the Carolina Tigers, and the Satchel Paige All-Stars, who played baseball in the Negro Leagues from 1955 to 1960, starting his career right out of high school. As of spring 2018, Mr. Atkinson, who lives in Maryland, remains an active volunteer in the newly opened, Hubert V. Simmons Museum of Negro Leagues Baseball, Inc., at the new Owings Mills Metro Centre Complex.

A brief history of the Negro League:

African Americans first began to play baseball in the late 1800s on military teams, college teams, and company teams, eventually finding their way to the established professional baseball teams of white players. However, racism and “Jim Crow” laws would force African Americans from these teams by 1900, with black players left to form their own teams.

In 1920, an organized league structure was formed under the guidance of Andrew “Rube” Foster, a former player, manager, and owner for the Chicago American Giants. In a meeting held at the Paseo YMCA in Kansas City, Mo., Foster and several other Midwestern team owners joined to form the Negro National League. Soon, rival leagues formed in Eastern and Southern states, which brought black baseball to major urban centers and to rural countrysides in the U.S., Canada, and Latin America. The Leagues maintained a high level of professional skill and inspired economic development in many black communities.

In 1945, when Major League Baseball’s Brooklyn Dodgers recruited Jackie Robinson from the Kansas City Monarchs, Robinson became the first African American in the modern era to play on a Major League roster. While this historic event was a key moment in baseball and civil rights history, it marked the decline of the Negro Leagues. The best black players began to be recruited for the Major Leagues with their black fans following them, and the last Negro Leagues teams folded in the early 1960s.

All Items : Antiques : Instruments and Implements : Medical : Apothecary : Pre 1910 item #1122652 (stock #M1229)
Stonegate Antiques
$195.00
Offered for your consideration is a vintage, all-original, framed paper advertising sign for the cure of Gonorrhea, Gleet and Syphilis in men. Of interest is the matching 10.5" x 7.5" wood frame with the lightly stamped word "OKAY" on the top. This unusual piece of advertising dates to the early 1900's.

Condition: Mild, unobtrusive wear to the paper. The blue round label is affixed to the glass, not the actual paper. The frame retains 2 early holes used for hanging along with various surface dings and an early slice of wood missing from the right side of frame.

Historically, Pabst's Okay Specifics was cited by the 1906 FDA Act for various violations including failure to mention alcohol content, having no known curative ingredient, etc, resulting in frequent seizure and destruction of the product!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #904409 (stock #BA851)
Stonegate Antiques
$475.00
This rarely found, 1937, tin, wind-up, DOUBLE JITTER-BUG Mechanical Dancing Toy was made by the Buffalo Toy & Tool Works. The Buffalo Toy & Tools Works was located in Buffalo, New York, and was established in 1924.

The toy is in very fine, working condition. When wound, the black dancers bob up and down, moving their hinged legs about and swinging their arms. The dancer's heads, bodies, and arms are constructed of flat tin, while their legs and feet are three dimensional. Other than a few light scratches here and there, the surface lithography and paint is in fabulous condition.

The toy measures 8” tall and 5 ½” wide. Marked with “MADE IN U.S.A.” on the back of the dancer's jackets as well as "MADE IN USA" and "PAT 2072308" (Patent Year 1937) on the bottom of the toy base.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1970 item #272747 (stock #BA260ADBA395)
Stonegate Antiques
$38.00
Offered for individual sale is a grouping of five, circa 1960's, "Days of the Week", cotton muslin Hand Towels featuring a cross-stitched Mammy hard at work tackling a different household chore on each day! The towels are priced at $38 each or $160 for all five towels. Please specify preference when making inquiries.

Four of the hand towels were made by the same individual, and are entirely hand-cross-stitched and hand-hemmed on a somewhat heavy-weight, cream-colored, cotton muslin. They measure approximately 36 inches square.

These four towels are as follows: "Monday"- featuring Mammy washing clothes in a wooden barrel, "Tuesday" featuring Mammy hanging clothes to dry on the clothesline, "Wednesday" featuring Mammy mending clothes, and "Thursday" featuring Mammy delivering a hand-picked, flower bouquet to a neighbor. Condition of all four towels is quite good with small, scattered, stain spots here and there- none in the area of the cross-stitching.

The fifth towel, "Friday", is made of a slightly lighter weight and whiter-colored, cotton muslin. It measures 28 x 29 inches, and again, it has a tiny stain spot here and there away from the cross-stitched area. The hems are machine stitched but the cross-stitching is hand-completed. This towel features a humorous scene of Mammy serving/making pancakes while a pitcher of milk or water unknowingly spills behind her!

These delightful towels would look charming folded and displayed on a kitchen wall rack or could even be framed - folded so that only the cross-stitched area is visible in the frame!

As each towel is priced separately, please email us stating which item you wish to purchase so that we can customize your order form.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #264104 (stock #BA388)
Stonegate Antiques
$195.00
The resplendent colors of this vintage, 1940's, all-hand-stitched, wool felt tote bag with rolled hand straps are pure eye candy!

This never-used tote bears the original paper tag which states, "Handmade by African Cripple; Ematupeni / Zimele Cripple Care Centers; Durban, England".

The artistry of the wool felt, hand-appliqued cut-outs featuring a mother and her three children is further enhanced by colorful bead work which was carefully placed for symmetry in design and form! A gorgeous piece of vintage African Artwork!

Measuring 14 long x 14 wide x 2 deep, the bag retains a "brand-new" appearance with no fading, rips, stains, or other blemishes.

Please see the companion "tea cozy" offered for sale and priced separately.

All Items : Vintage Arts : Instruments and Implements : Medical : Pre 1960 item #693786 (stock #M1217)
Stonegate Antiques
$125.00
Offered for your consideration is a very rarely found Bausch & Lomb advertising and teaching display!

The display is quite appealing with embossed and raised detailing featuring both the interior and exterior eye anatomy.

The sign dates to the 1950s and is in fine condition. It is complete with its original fold-out display stand, and it measures approximately 13 inches high x 8 inches wide.

All Items : Vintage Arts : Instruments and Implements : Pre 1900 item #1370870 (stock #J1254)
Stonegate Antiques
$55.00
This is a scarce collection of 22 Homeopathic Medicine bottles complete with contents, corks and labels dating to the turn of the 19th century. Each vial sports an applied label that indicates the contents plus a cork with hand-written ingredients noted. The vials measure between 2 - 2.5 inches high x 1/2" including the cork. Hard to find in any condition.

*****Group #2*****

Some History:
Although homeopathy has its roots in ancient Greek medicine and in the work of the 16th-century physician Paracelsus, modern homeopathy dates back 200 years to the work of the German doctor and chemist, Samuel Hahnemann. Hahnemann qualified as a physician but ceased to practice as a doctor because of what he saw as the barbaric medical practices of his day - which included bloodletting and the overuse of toxic medicines, leading to horrific side effects.

A brilliant linguist, he earned a living from translating books and was interested by a reference in a medical textbook of the use of China (Peruvian bark) as a cure for malaria. Intrigued to know why China worked, he took doses of the remedy until he himself began to exhibit malarial symptoms. He stopped taking the China and the symptoms went away. From this he deduced that the ancient principle of 'like cures like' actually worked.

His next step was to determine if there were safe levels at which toxic substances could be given - and still cure the type of symptoms that they might otherwise cause. His experiments with dilution led him to discover that the more a substance was diluted, the more potent it appeared to become.

Homeopathic medicine was born, but in practicing it, Hahnemann and his followers were subjected to ridicule and persecution by the medical establishment, despite the fact that they were seeing patients getting better on tiny doses of medicines, prescribed on the basis of 'like cures like'. Many European practitioners immigrated to the United States, where homeopathy flourished in the 19th century – until the medical establishment there systematically acted to remove its influence.

Hahnemann ended his days as a renowned and very busy practitioner in Paris, working into his 80's. He is interred at the Cimetière du Père Lachaise, where a large monument honors him and his discovery of Homeopathy.

All Items : Vintage Arts : Instruments and Implements : Medical : Apothecary : Pre 1900 item #1386755 (stock #M1370)
Stonegate Antiques
$125.00
Offered is a choice, 19th century, physician's, folding Homeopathic Medicine Case. This wonderful example contains 143 of the original 150 corked vials!

Each vial measures approximately 1.5 inches in length including the cork. The vials are nestled in the leather case, with most vials sporting a hand written label on the top of the cork. The fitted case measures 7.5" long x 2" wide x 3.5" high and shows honorable wear commensurate with age and use. Modest wear and loss to the case edges is noted with separation of 2 flaps, specifically the top left flap and middle left flap.

The many vials include a very desirable example labeled 30 CANNAB IND (cannabis indica). Other vials include: BELLAD, ACID PHOS, ALOES, MAGN. C., LYCOP, ZINC M., STAPH. to name a few.

A wonderful representation of late 19th century homeopathic medicine!

All Items : Traditional Collectibles : Books : Bindings : History : Pre 1900 item #113528 (stock #B132)
Stonegate Antiques
$145.00
The book, THOMPSON IN AFRICA or AN ACCOUNT OF THE MISSIONARY LABORS, SUFFERINGS, TRAVELS, AND OBSERVATIONS is the compilation of the journal kept by missionary George Thompson while working at the Mendi Mission in Sierra Leone, Africa, during the period 1848-1851. This is a second edition published in 1852, printed for the author by William Harned, 48 Beekman Street, New York City (the first edition was published in 1851).

George Thompson’s missionary service to Africa occurs approximately 7 years after the MENDI natives of the AMISTAD were accompanied by missionaries on their return to Africa. He serves this very same mission, now in the of colony Sierra Leone, a colony which was established to serve as refuge for the liberated Africans taken from slave ships. 356 pages long, this journal provides a fascinating account of all aspects of the Mendi culture seen through the eyes, however biased in his mission to convert the Africans to Christianity, of a genuinely well-meaning gentleman of his time. Condition: complete, tight binding, foxing throughout, spine wear as shown in picture.

Thompson states, “It is hoped that the following narrative may, in the hands of GOD, awaken a desire in many hearts to go to Africa, for the purposes of preaching, teaching, farming, building houses, mills, manufactories, etc., and thus assist in making long despised and neglected AFRICA, what it is capable of becoming, THE GARDEN OF THE WORLD.”

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1920 item #807810 (stock #BA723)
Stonegate Antiques
$195.00
Measuring a diminutive 4.50 inches long x 2.50 inches high, this very unusual tin and pot metal piece features a small black shoe shine boy with shoe polishing brush in hand, about to polish a giant ladies lace-up shoe!!

The piece has two tiny holes in its bowl suggesting that this was once screwed or fastened into another piece. Logic suggests that perhaps this may have been an advertising display item of some sort.

Remnants of red paint are easily visible on the back of the black boy's hat as well as on his lips, and the giant shoe also displays remnants of black paint. When one looks quite closely, one can see that the entire figure was at one time painted. Some light superficial rusting to the bowl is evident here and there.

Certainly a mystery piece as to purpose, this fascinating Black Memorabilia collectible remains quite intriguing and does reinforce a stereotypical occupation associated with black folk during the unfortunate Jim Crow era.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #855335 (stock #BA0001)
Stonegate Antiques
$60.00
Offered are three, VERY RARELY found, 1890's, Black Memorabilia-themed trade cards priced at $60.00 each or 2 for $110.00.

The CZAR Baking Powder card is SOLD. It was printed by the Empire Lithography Company, Pearl Street, New York, and is so marked at the bottom of the front side. This card is brilliantly colored with a phenomenal graphic of a Mammy and her son admiring an utterly huge loaf of bread which presumably owes its immense size to CZAR Baking Powder. The reverse side carries a testimony by a Yale College professor attesting to the wonder of the CZAR product which is manufactured by Steele and Emery Company of New Haven, Connecticut. The card measures 3 inches x 4.75 inches.

The MISFIT Clothing Company card is copyrighted 1898 by J.H. Bufford Company in the lower right front corner. In the upper left corner, the card is entitled "In the Land of Cotton" and features a wonderfully detailed scene of African-American families working the cotton fields with a large cotton gin looming in the background. The card measures 2.75 inches x 4.50 inches. The reverse side is an advertisement for Misfit Clothing sold by the J. Bamott & Company of Washington Street, Boston.

The Welcome Soap advertising card also measures 2.75 inches x 4.50 inches and is entitled "Photography Under a Cloud". It features a fabulous litho of 5 African-American boys with exaggerated facial features who are attempting to take a photograph using an early camera. The litho is marked in the lower right corner "Bufford, Boston". The reverse side further advertises WELCOME SOAP and features two shaking hands.

All three trade cards are in very fine condition with nice color and some very subtle evidence of age staining as seen in photos. The cards have no rips, bends, or fading. The back sides of the Czar card and the MISFIT CLOTHING card have glue stains.

These rare trade cards would be stunning matted and framed as a group!

As each is priced separately (see photos for pricing), please email us stating which item you wish to purchase so that we can customize your order form.

All Items : Vintage Arts : Instruments and Implements : Medical : Apothecary : Pre 1920 item #1402150 (stock #M1387)
Stonegate Antiques
$325.00
Offered is a wonderful piece of circa 1940's, Lebanon, Tennessee, drug store history!

Researching the drug store's history was fascinating as the same family operated it for over 50 years! The SHANNON family founded and ran this all-inclusive, community-centered, soda fountain and drug store from 1912 until 1964. The years spanning from its 1912 opening through the 1950s appeared to be the drug store's heyday as it served as a popular community gathering place catering to local servicemen and their families for decades and through both World Wars. A wonderful article dated January 4, 2019, found in THE WILSON POST describes this drug store's fascinating history and is a must read!

This brightly colored, hand-painted, metal advertising sign measures 20 inches wide x 14 inches long, an ideal size for easy display in one's collection. Its condition suggests that it may never have been used. Upon close inspection, hand-applied, yellow brush strokes are noted, with the black lettering possibly applied as a stencil. Various small areas of paint loss and minor metal imperfections exist, all commensurate with age. A fabulous piece of Lebanon, Tennessee, advertising and local history!

All Items : Vintage Arts : Instruments and Implements : Medical : Apothecary : Pre 1920 item #1392218 (stock #J1271)
Stonegate Antiques
$90.00
Offered is a very nice group of vintage Parke Davis pharmacy bottles dating from 1900 through 1920s.

First, is a nearly 8 inch amber bottle GAMBIR, a mild tonic and astringent.
Bottle #2 JALAP, a cathartic, measures 5 inches, is a circa 1900 amber example sporting the early factory image.
Bottle #3 OX GALL, a tonic and laxative, is 5 inches tall and also sports the early PD factory label.
Bottles #4 + 5 measure 5 inches tall. CALUMBA a tonic and stimulant. APOCYNUM (Canadian Hemp) an emetic and expectorant.
Bottles #6 and 7, DAMIANA, used as a mood enhancer or digestive stimulant, measures 4 inches. In early history, Damiana was noted as having an "effect on sexual desire".
Drug #8 CREOSOTE a expectorant measures 5 inches.
Bottles #9 and 10 labeled INFANT No.2 measure 2.25 inches and contain Calomel, a purgative and ipecac (induces vomiting).
Medicines # 11 and 12 are boxed Herbs STRAMONIUM used for asthma.
Bottles #13 and 14 CATHARTIC COMPOUND measure 7 inches high and contain colocynth used for liver, gallbladder and other issues.

The condition of the bottles is excellent. The labels are mostly complete with some showing honorable wear, stains, fading all commensurate with vintage medicines.

A wonderful collection of vintage pharmacy products.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #1404041 (stock #11HelRid)
Stonegate Antiques
$195.00
Offered is a wonderful, original, C1950, BROWN FACE, Aunt Jemima Cookie Jar made by F & F Mold & Die Works of Dayton, Ohio. The vintage, C1950's, green, back and white linen, kitchen towel shown in the background is also included--perfect condition.

Plastic Aunt Jemima Cookie jars were a box-top coupon offer from the Quaker Oats Company through 1951. The faces came in two colors, brown and black, with the BROWN face much harder to find as fewer were made, making the BROWN face Aunt Jemima's quite collectible today! The black face was first offered in 1948, with the brown face offered the following year in 1949.

Measuring 12 inches tall and 7 inches wide at the widest point of her skirt, Aunt Jemima is in quite wonderful condition with just very minimal and subtle paint loss, most prominently to her white apron (see photos).

Some slight superficial rubbing to the finish here and there as expected in a nearly 70 year old collectible. Marked on the base " F & F Mold & Die Works, Dayton Ohio Made in the USA".

Quite difficult to find in this near-excellent condition! Please view our other Aunt Jemima offerings!