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All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #264039 (stock #BA13)
Stonegate Antiques
$325.00
A very RARE and highly appealing Black Memorabilia Advertising Diecut!

Marked "Copyright 1924", in the lower left hand corner, this extremely hard-to-find advertising piece measures 10.5 inches wide x 13.5 inches high. Colorful and visually interesting, the heavy cardboard diecut depicts an engaging Uncle Wabash serenely strumming his banjo on his front porch! Guess the message to the consumer was, "Eat one of Uncle Wabash's cupcakes to experience your own little slice of heaven and serenity!"

Condition of this charming piece of Black Historical ephemera is quite good given its 80+ years of age!! Old water staining to bottom of the diecut does little to detract from the piece. Crease line to one cupcake edge. Appropriate age foxing to back.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #877763 (stock #BAFolder)
Stonegate Antiques
$50.00
Measuring approximately 4.5 x 6.5 inches, this January 7, 1930, postmarked souvenir postcard folder is entitled, "Souvenir Folder of Dixieland". It was published by Asheville Post Card Company of Asheville, North Carolina.

The folder was mailed, but remains in fine condition given its age. Some edge wear evident at corners. While some photos may appear a bit blurry, this is a function of photography and not condition. All postcards are crisp and clear!

The Real Photo postcard folder features the lyrics of "Dixieland" and 18 full color scenes featuring stereotypical and actual depictions of African-American southern life. Some politically incorrect and derogatory captioning. Scenes depicting the cotton and tobacco industries are also featured.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #560821 (stock #BA616ABC)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Measuring 8.5 x 11 inches, this vintage 1934, paper, window advertisement promotes the "COTTONTIME MINSTREL" show at Kenilworth School on Friday, November 2, 1934, at 8:15PM!

Poster reads further: "Benefit- Pals Bible Club-Elm Street Baptist Church". "Directed by Churchill Traylor". Features a very sweet Black Minstrel caricature graphic! It is believed that this event took place in the Petersburg, Virginia area.

Fine condition with very subtle age-related edge tears that do not interfere with image. Would look just wonderful framed!!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1910 item #192615 (stock #BA305)
Stonegate Antiques
$95.00
Measuring 3.25 inches X 4 inches, this early 1900's, Glass Magic Lantern Slide is in pristine condition!

Featuring wonderful, vivid colors, this slide is titled "Two Old Chums" on the paper label attached to the back of the slide. The slide depicts an older black gentleman standing, hat in hand, beside a seated, very despondent-looking, white gentleman- who appears to have been drinking.

The slide has wonderful detailing--In particular, please note the print of a Black Child playing the Banjo which hangs on the wall at the far right side of the room!

Very hard to find Black Memorabilia in fabulous condition!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #1217332 (stock #BA872)
Stonegate Antiques
$1,295.00
Offered are an extraordinary and most rarely-found pair of early 19th century, child/young adolescent - size, Slave Rattle Shackles with one measuring approximately 4.75 inches tall by 7 3/8 inches wide and the other measuring 5.25 inches tall by 7.5 inches wide.

The oddly-shaped, hand-wrought shackles each have two lateral "pockets" that contain pieces of metal or balls that “rattle” as the wearer moves about, thus indicating the wearer's location. This type of shackle is noted in historical references as a Crab Rattler Shackle due to its visual similarity to that sea animal. Each shackle has a pair of small chain links attached at the top. One shackle would have been placed on each leg, and a metal chain would have then been threaded through the attached rings and secured with a lock.

The age of these shackles is formally listed as 19th century, but could very well be older, dating to the last quarter of the 18th century. Condition is quite good given age and use. Please note the small hole present on the side of one shackle as noted in photo. All original and untouched, an utterly horrible, tangible testament to the malevolence of slavery. A VERY RARE form of rattle shackle, even more particularly so due to its small size!

Also currently offered for sale and priced separately is a very diminutive child rattle shackle in an unusual form out of a South Carolina estate. Additionally, de-accessioned from the Middle Passage Museum is an ultra-rare set of 19th Century Slave Ship Shackles from a New Orleans, Louisiana, former slave trader estate! Please type the word "shackles" in the search box on our home page to find all sets of shackles currently being offered.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #383422 (stock #BA473)
Stonegate Antiques
$225.00
An unusual piece, this delightful, cloth Mammy Broom Doll from the 1940's measures 12.5 inches high with a total height of 31 inches including the broom.

Mammy's wonderful, smiling face is all hand-stitched while her clothes are machine sewn. Her blouse is striped cotton, as are Mammy's head, arms, skirt, apron, and cap. Her head, arms, and upper torso have been stuffed with cotton batting. The natural bristle broom fills out both Mammy's torso and skirt & the wooden broom handle extends upward through her neck and head.

Mammy is in all original condition with no mends or repairs. The structural integrity of the broom remains quite sound. Mammy's white cotton apron and cap have been professionally cleaned, removing nearly all traces of old stains, dirt, and dust.

A fabulous piece of vintage Black Americana, and a seldom seen form of the Black Mammy Doll!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #335804 (stock #BA301)
Stonegate Antiques
$45.00
Measuring 3 inches high, this delightfully sweet, circa 1940’s, black bisque baby boy is in mint condition! Excellent paint, with not a chip or flake to be found! Dressed in painted blue shorts and white shirt, this little darling even retains his three, original yarn pigtails! Incised on back: JAPAN. A very, very charming piece of vintage Black Memorabilia!
All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #676625 (stock #BA337)
Stonegate Antiques
$75.00
In lovely condition with the exception of subtle fading to Mammy's red head kerchief, this delightful 1940's pin cushion doll appears to have been unused! No pinholes can be seen!

Mammy's head and body are actually constructed of a single wooden clothespin that was then inserted into her cotton-batting-padded skirt. Her face is hand-painted, she has a tuft of white cotton batting hair peeking out from her kerchief, and her apron is stamped in black ink "Souvenir of New Orleans".

A very sweet piece to add to one's sewing or doll collection!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #1303344 (stock #BA927)
Stonegate Antiques
$155.00
Measuring 21 inches in length, this very handsomely attired, gentleman golliwog doll hails from the early 1950's and remains in near pristine condition. Displayed under glass all of these years, his clothing retains good color and is free of soiling with the exception of his white cotton vest which has one small spot on either side that are both nicely concealed when his jacket is set properly in place. (Clothing is removable if the new owner wishes to launder.)

The golly's clothing is machine stitched; his red mouth and white eyeballs are constructed of felt. His body is tightly stuffed with cotton batting allowing him to be displayed either in a sitting position or standing with the support of a doll stand.

A brief history of the Golliwog doll: The Golliwog is based on a Black minstrel doll that the Victorian era illustrator, Florence Kate Upton, born in 1873 of English parents, had played with as a small child in New York. Upton's Golliwog character was first introduced to the world in her 1895 book entitled The Adventures of Two Dutch Dolls. Like the rag doll that inspired it, the Golliwog in her book was an ugly creature with very dark, jet black skin, large white-rimmed eyes, red clown lips, and wild, frizzy hair. Golliwogs are typically male and are generally dressed in a jacket, trousers, bow tie, and stand-up collar in a combination of red, white, blue, black, and occasionally yellow colors.

A very sweet piece!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #794507 (stock #BA709)
Stonegate Antiques
$475.00
Offered are two utterly fabulous, one-of-a-kind, DOUBLE-SIDED, hand-painted signs that hung at Joe's "Colored Only" fish shack near Albany, Georgia, on the Flint River. These signs were created by the black folks who owned the shack which closed in the late 1950s, early 1960s. The folks had an area to eat in --serving pig ears and fish-- and also caught and cleaned fish.

These signs have a very colorful, folk-art appeal and certainly are utterly unique! They very much fit into the American, Southern "Outsider Art" collecting genre, a genre which highlights the work of self-taught, rural area artists who create fabulous and highly expressive art using the media and materials that they have at hand and which reflects the world that they know and live in.

The signs are quite heavy as each is made from a solid wood board. The signs are nearly identical in size and measure approximately 25 1/2 inches wide x 14 5/8 high x 3/4ths of an inch thick. One of the signs has very, very slight warping, but the warpage is not readily evident as seen by pictures. Each sign has 2 holes from which to hang them, and the old rusted hanging wire which is seen in the photos has been replaced by new hanging wire.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Toys : Specialty : Pre 1960 item #113537 (stock #G343)
Stonegate Antiques
$85.00
A delightful find for the Baby Boomer Generation! A circa 1950's, mint condition, COMPLETE SET of bright blue, yellow, and green plastic toy All-American Police Whistles, untouched in their original, cardboard, store display box!

This type of display would have been placed on the counter next to the checkout register with the gum and candy to entice little girls and boys to purchase!

The display box cover features a city policeman demonstrating the authentic and powerful amplitude of the whistles. The cover has a perforated seam that was meant to be unfastened when the box was displayed open so that the policeman and city skyline stood tall above the whistles. The cover has yet to be displayed in this manner.

Marked ALL AMERICAN PLASTIC WHISTLES with no other maker’s mark evident. Very Cool and Colorful Baby Boomer Collectible!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1150386 (stock #BA822)
Stonegate Antiques
$575.00
Offered is the fabulously RARE BIGGER HAIR Negro Tobacco container produced from the mid 1940's through the early 1960's. This container is actually constructed of cardboard with tin base, and is much less frequently found, and thus, much more rare than the earlier, all-metal, and scarce-in-its-own-right, Nigger Hair container due to the greater fragility of cardboard as compared to metal, as well as the fewer numbers of cardboard containers produced.

Following the conclusion of World War II, the American Tobacco Company of Virginia changed its product name from Nigger Hair to Bigger Hair, seeking to broaden the product's marketing appeal as well as viewing the latter label as the more-socially acceptable one. (The earlier Nigger Hair moniker was used by the American Tobacco Company from the 1890's through the early, pre-WWII 1940s; the lithographed can was manufactured by the B. Leidersdorf Company, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.) Interestingly, the company DID NOT change the image of the African woman, but merely added the words Fiji Islander to the left of her face in its indifferent and weak attempt to move further away from the earlier, severely derogatory label.

Measuring 7 inches high x 5 ¾ inches wide, the photos provide a fine representation of condition. The container is in near-mint condition with a tiny rub here and there, and some very minor wear around the top of the container that likely occurred from simply taking the cover on and off. This wear is completely covered by the cover. The original orange color of the container remains consistent throughout, and the structural integrity of the cardboard is quite sturdy. The original wax bag which held the tobacco remains inside--highly unusual! The container retains most of its paper Federal Revenue Tobacco seal on either side and is dated February 26, 1926, Series 119, a tax stamp which was issued exclusively in 1949. Truly incredible condition given the age and material composition of this piece--- 69 years!!

This very rare tobacco container is just a wonderful example of latter Black Americana advertising and looks even better "in person" than the camera was able to capture with its lens!

If the Nigger Hair Tobacco container is currently in your collection, the addition of the Bigger Hair container will complete your collection from both a cultural and historical perspective! The Nigger Hair Tobacco container featured in the last photo is currently available. Both pieces may be purchased for the single price of $1195 with no further discounts applicable.

*** Type "tobacco" in our web cover page SEARCH box to locate the 1941 Nigger Hair Tobacco tin currently available and full of original tobacco!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 2000 item #451878 (stock #BA560)
Stonegate Antiques
$75.00
Offered is an authentic signed baseball from former Negro League player CLIFFORD LAYTON. The ball was signed for me at an autograph show and is dated 4-15-05.

Mr. Layton was a skilled pitcher with a strong bat who had a four-year career in the Negro Leagues, playing for the Indianapolis Clowns, the New York Black Yankees and the Raleigh Tigers. One of his teammates was a promising infielder by the name of Hank Aaron, who signed with the Boston Braves in 1952, and eventually became a Hall of Famer. Layton received an invitation in 1951 to try out for the Brooklyn Dodgers, but by then his shoulder was troubling him so he declined, hoping it would heal and another opportunity would present, which unfortunately never came. As of 2016, Mr. Layton, at the age of 87, was enjoying retirement as an associate pastor in a North Carolina ministry.

A brief history of the Negro League:

African-Americans first began to play baseball in the late 1800s on military teams, college teams, and company teams, eventually finding their way to the established professional baseball teams of white players. However, racism and “Jim Crow” laws would force African-Americans from these teams by 1900, with black players left to form their own teams.

In 1920, an organized league structure was formed under the guidance of Andrew “Rube” Foster, a former player, manager, and owner for the Chicago American Giants. In a meeting held at the Paseo YMCA in Kansas City, Mo., Foster and several other Midwestern team owners joined to form the Negro National League. Soon, rival leagues formed in Eastern and Southern states, which brought black baseball to major urban centers and to rural countrysides in the U.S., Canada, and Latin America. The Leagues maintained a high level of professional skill and inspired economic development in many black communities.

In 1945, when Major League Baseball’s Brooklyn Dodgers recruited Jackie Robinson from the Kansas City Monarchs, Robinson became the first African-American in the modern era to play on a Major League roster. While this historic event was a key moment in baseball and civil rights history, it marked the decline of the Negro Leagues. The best black players began to be recruited for the Major Leagues with their black fans following them, and the last Negro Leagues teams folded in the early 1960s.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1253944 (stock #BA905)
Stonegate Antiques
$125.00
Offered for separate purchase are two, RARELY FOUND, salesman sample boxes of Sharpoint Black Face Wire Cobbler's Nails measuring a very diminutive 2" tall x 1.25" wide and 1.75" tall x 1" wide!

The trademark for Sharpoint is a cleverly-designed, eye-catching, broadly smiling image of an African American gent. If one looks closely, one can clearly see the words "Sharpoint Cobblers Nails" printed within the black space of the gent's mouth! A very "sharp" advertising strategy!

Sharpoint Wire Cobbler's Nails were manufactured by the Charles F. Baker Co, Boston, Massachusetts. The smaller box retains its end flap which features both the manufacturing and patent information, with the patent number corresponding to a 1933 USA Patent date. Each box amazingly still retains the original cobbler's nails!

The boxes are in very good condition considering their age and the fact that they held tiny, sharp nails for over 80 years! As stated earlier, the smaller box does retain the end flap which features manufacturing info. The larger box is missing this flap. The cover litho on each box remains very crisp and clear. Typical, age-related edge wear is noted. Please peruse all photos for condition details. The boxes have been shrink-wrapped to protect the integrity of the cardboard, and they do contain the nails.

These VERY, VERY RARELY FOUND SALESMAN SAMPLE size boxes WITH ORIGINAL NAILS are offered at $125 each, or the two boxes can be purchased as a pair for $198.00 firm.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #283921 (stock #BA402)
Stonegate Antiques
$395.00
This handsome Black Memorabilia Male Golliwogg doll comes straight from an English home!

A brief history of the Golliwog doll: The Golliwog is based on a Black minstrel doll that the Victorian era illustrator, Florence Kate Upton, born in 1873 of English parents, had played with as a small child in New York. Upton's Golliwog character was first introduced to the world in her 1895 book entitled The Adventures of Two Dutch Dolls. Like the rag doll that inspired it, the Golliwog in her book was an ugly creature with very dark, jet black skin, large white-rimmed eyes, red clown lips, and wild, frizzy hair. Golliwogs are typically male and are generally dressed in a jacket, trousers, bow tie, and stand-up collar in a combination of red, white, blue, black, and occasionally yellow colors.

Measuring 21.5 inches long, this delightful and appealing cloth Golli is unmarked and is thought, by his original and quite elderly owner, to have been made in the mid 1940's! (She speculates that he could even be a bit older than that, but she remembers not acquiring him until after the end of WWII.)

His nose and mouth are hand-stitched and he has round, cloth covered button eyes- the pupils were hand-colored using black ink! His nicely coiffed, black hair appears to have been styled from soft, "stuffed animal-type" fur! Rather interesting and ingenious! He has a machine-stitched, cotton batting stuffed, black sock cloth body. His colorful wardrobe is also machine stitched- green wool mourning coat, gold vest, and red and white polka-dotted cotton pants and matching bow tie!

He is in wonderful condition with the exception of some tiny moth holes to the back of his mourning coat (see photos) as well as another tiny moth hole to the back of his right arm and back right pants leg. The polka dot clothing shows the slightest hint of fading. His dark black fur hair also shows some age-related color change to brown at the roots. Hmm...then again...perhaps he's simply overdue for another hair coloring appointment at the Salon!

A very sweet addition to one's Black Memorabilia or Golliwogg collection!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #365260 (stock #BA450)
Stonegate Antiques
$80.00
Measuring 8 3/4 inches long x 6 ½ inches wide, this very charming, circa 1920-1930’s key or pot holder hanger is entirely hand-made- and is a fabulous example of early American Folk Art!

Constructed of hand-cut, ¼ inch wide, black painted wood, this darling little black girl has hand-painted eyes and smiling lips, and is dressed in a hand and machine stitched, cloth-stuffed, one piece, black, tan and green dress! She has a hole in each ear, a metal hanging loop atop her head and one metal hook on each shoe for hanging keys or potholders!

She is in fine condition given her 70+ years of age and has great “patina”. Some minor paint loss, a few teeny holes in her outfit, but very visually appealing Black Americana Folk Art, none the less!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #1251320 (stock #BA902)
Stonegate Antiques
$995.00
Measuring approximately 10 inches long by 2.50 inches high, these untouched, unused, all-original, porcelain-enameled, 1940-50s, metal signs are extraordinarily RARE pieces of Black American history-- artifacts of the "Jim Crow" era when segregation of the African American race was unfortunately, most commonplace.

These signs were found in March of 1971, inside the abandoned and decaying basement of the former Philadelphia Enameling Works factory at the corner of 13th and Vine Streets in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The gentleman from whom these signs were purchased, bought these segregation signs along with hundreds of others signs of all types found in the basement of this former factory (see last photo) and has very kindly written a letter of provenance which has been photographed here and which will be included with these signs upon their sale.

These historic signs are enameled on both sides, and on the front sides are written, "COLORED MEN" and "COLORED WOMEN". The signs feature black lettering on a white background.

The signs are in all-original condition with some very minor discoloration and very unobtrusive edge discoloration pinpoints and some enameling loss here and there as seen in photos.

Extremely RARE, UNUSED, one-of-a-kind, museum-worthy pieces of Black American history that are quite likely the only ones of their kind extant today! Condition is amazing!

Also currently offered for separate sale at $895.00 and originating from this same collection is a pair of signs labeled "COLORED" and "WHITE". (See last photo) Please take a moment to view these signs by simply by typing the word "segregation" into the SEARCH box on our homepage.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #596309 (stock #BA641A)
Stonegate Antiques
$75.00
This is an authentic signed baseball from former Negro League baseball player Luther "Luke" Atkinson. The ball was signed at an autograph show in March 2006. Luther "Luke" Atkinson was #20, a stand-out performer for the Wilson, North Carolina All Stars, the Carolina Tigers, and the Satchel Paige All-Stars, who played baseball in the Negro Leagues from 1955 to 1960, starting his career right out of high school. As of spring 2018, Mr. Atkinson, who lives in Maryland, remains an active volunteer in the newly opened, Hubert V. Simmons Museum of Negro Leagues Baseball, Inc., at the new Owings Mills Metro Centre Complex.

A brief history of the Negro League:

African Americans first began to play baseball in the late 1800s on military teams, college teams, and company teams, eventually finding their way to the established professional baseball teams of white players. However, racism and “Jim Crow” laws would force African Americans from these teams by 1900, with black players left to form their own teams.

In 1920, an organized league structure was formed under the guidance of Andrew “Rube” Foster, a former player, manager, and owner for the Chicago American Giants. In a meeting held at the Paseo YMCA in Kansas City, Mo., Foster and several other Midwestern team owners joined to form the Negro National League. Soon, rival leagues formed in Eastern and Southern states, which brought black baseball to major urban centers and to rural countrysides in the U.S., Canada, and Latin America. The Leagues maintained a high level of professional skill and inspired economic development in many black communities.

In 1945, when Major League Baseball’s Brooklyn Dodgers recruited Jackie Robinson from the Kansas City Monarchs, Robinson became the first African American in the modern era to play on a Major League roster. While this historic event was a key moment in baseball and civil rights history, it marked the decline of the Negro Leagues. The best black players began to be recruited for the Major Leagues with their black fans following them, and the last Negro Leagues teams folded in the early 1960s.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1403318 (stock #07HelRid)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Measuring 7 3/4 inches long x 4 inches wide (at the widest points on each spoon rest), these VERY RARE, 1930’s VINTAGE, Cast Iron, Aunt Jemima / Mammy and Uncle Mose / Black Man Chef spoon rests sport the mellow look of years and years of use along with the wonderful, smooth, silky feel of the surface of genuine antique ironware! These are NOT reproductions!

The well-appointed Chef Uncle Mose sports a very wide grin and holds a bowl of eggs in his right arm and a wooden mixing spoon in his left. He is in very fine condition with a very subtle suggestion here and there of a remnant of his original gold paint. There are subtle dings to the backside as well as evidence of superficial surface rust. The following is imprinted on the Chef's backside: “Compliments The Toledo Stove And Range Co”, although the striking of the "O" and "L" are very faint. This imprint documents the spoon rest’s original function- continuous promotional advertising presented as a free giveaway to buyers purchasing the company’s products!

The well-dressed Aunt Jemima Mammy sports a wide grin and holds an iron in her right hand and other household implements in the left. She is in very fine condition with a smattering of some very subtle superficial rusting here and there. Evidence of the original gold paint is also subtle but can be seen. The back side of the spoon rest is perfect and looks as though it came right out of the factory just yesterday with a very solid and clear imprinting of the Toledo Stove Company advertising.

A very rare find!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1920 item #807580 (stock #BA720)
Stonegate Antiques
$275.00
Offered is this extremely RARE 1920's, cardboard, D.L. Clark Company, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 120 count, BLACK JACK Caramel "PENNY CANDY" BOX which features a singing Black Dandy strumming a banjo.

Cardboard candy boxes with black themes remain EXTREMELY RARE finds in today's market!!!

The piece is in very fine condition with expected edge and corner wear. The top left seam of the cover has split but otherwise, the box remains intact with no missing pieces.

D. L. Clark Company History:

David L. Clark (1864-1939) was born in Ireland and came to America when he was eight years old. He entered the candy business working for a small manufacturer in New York. After three years as a salesman, he bought a wagon, horses and merchandise, and went into business for himself.

The D. L. Clark Company was founded in 1886 when Clark started manufacturing candy in two back rooms of a small house in Pittsburgh's North Side. He began selling his candy in the streets of Pittsburgh. During his lifetime, his company became a leading candy manufacturer.

By 1920, the D. L. Clark Company was making about 150 different types of candy, including several five-cent bars, specialty items and bulk candy. Clark was also manufacturing chewing gum in a building across the street from his candy factory. In 1921, they incorporated Clark Brothers Chewing Gum Company as a separate business.

By 1931, the candy bar business was so expansive that Clark decided to sell the gum company, and it was renamed the Clark Gum Company.

The D. L. Clark Company remained in the hands of the Clark family until it was sold in 1955 to the Beatrice Food Company who operated the company until 1983 when in turn, it was sold to the Pittsburgh Food and Beverage Company. In 1995, the Pittsburgh Food and Beverage was thrown into bankruptcy. The company was shut down for several months and its assets divested. Restructured as Clark Bar America, the company operated until May of 1999, when it was purchased by New England Confectionery Company (NECCO), the oldest candy manufacturer in the United States.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #264054 (stock #BA387)
Stonegate Antiques
$29.00
With the exception of very minimal wear to edges, this circa 1890s stereoview card is in fine condition!

Labeled #298, "Native Cane Grinders in Sunny Florida", the scene depicts 7 young Black men either chewing on a sugar cane stalk or holding a sugar cane cutting implement.

Printed on the back of the card is a brief history of sugar cane cultivation from its origins in 500 AD China to its introduction in the US in 1675 by the Jesuits. The harvesting process is also discussed.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1920 item #904459 (stock #BA912)
Stonegate Antiques
$525.00
Seldom found on today's collectible market, this all-original, Mayo’s Cut Plug Tobacco Roly Poly Mammy Tin dates to circa 1912.

In 1912, in a stroke of advertising genius, Mayo's Tobacco Company packaged their cut plug tobacco in round tins with a lithographed character. Each held 1 pound of tobacco. It was opened by removing the head!

These "Roly-Polys" were a unique shape that distinguished them from the rectangular and lunch box-shaped tins that surrounded them on store shelves. There were a number of different characters that were available, and smokers were encouraged to collect the entire set. The six original tins were the Satisfied Customer, the Storekeeper, the Singing Waiter, the Dutchman, Scotland Yard....and Mammy!

Mayo called this packaging a "Brownie" tin...apparently the company suggested that the tins be used as brownie containers after the tobacco was used, and designed them accordingly. They were never a plentiful tin, and today, are becoming increasingly more and more difficult to find.

The Mayo tobacco tins were distinguished by little packages of Mayo Cut Plug tobacco shown somewhere on the character. Notice that the Mammy tin has a tiny tobacco tin tucked into her front pocket.

Mammy's dimensions are 7"x7". She is in good condition, as evidenced by the photos which clearly detail the flaws she has acquired over her 100+ years of existence. The body of the tin has minor paint loss to the litho as seen in photos, minor and subtle surface scratching (see photos), and small areas of denting to the top of mammy's head (see photo) and to her base near the cigarette pack protruding from her pocket (see photo). The body has some light soiling and has the appropriate wear at contact points. The tin has no repaint but does have some light, interior rusting to the interior of the base as well as a couple of tiny size holes which can be seen in the 12th photo (tiny holes show up as white spots in the photo). The base was held up to the bright, outdoor light to illuminate the holes- which actually make them appear more prominent than they actually are!

The base of the tin is labeled "made in factory # 42, in the 2nd District of Virginia".

**The depth of color is better viewed "in person" as opposed to what I was able to capture in a photo.**

A must-have addition to any SERIOUS Black Americana collection! A note on the rarity of this item....this is only the second Mayo Cut Plug tin that I have had the pleasure of offering for sale in my 20+ years specializing in Black Americana! The tin displays beautifully!!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1401924 (stock #BA942)
Stonegate Antiques
$95.00
Measuring approximately 10.5 inches tall, these sweet, hand-made, circa 1930's, Great Depression era, Mammy and Pappy dolls feature dried apples as heads! Common household items such as chicken or turkey breast bones, dried corn cobs, old rubber baby bottle nipples, wooden clothespins and dried fruit were frequently employed to make play-dolls when money was tight and store-bought toys were beyond reach!

These two folk art pieces came straight from the 93 year old great grandma who played with them as a child!

While the heads were constructed from dried apples painted black, the bodies were cut from various pieces of sponge which were then hand-sewn together. Hands were cut from pink--- and not brown or black felt--very interesting---while the teeth were formed from tiny white beads, and the white fuzzy hair fashioned from nothing more than small, cotton batting pieces. Eyes are glued-on googly eyes.

The homemade clothing is nicely constructed via a combination of hand and machine sewing. Mammy's green, teal and rust flowered dress is embellished with a bit of lace at the sleeves, and she also wears a fancy, white eyelet petticoat and a soft pink crocheted shawl. She is barefoot. Pappy's light blue shirt features 3 button detailing, and he wears denim pants and black felt shoes and hat with a red felt vest.

Condition is quite fine with no observable issues! No odors, rips, stains or missing parts. A very sweet pair!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1303175 (stock #BA925)
Stonegate Antiques
$1,950.00
Measuring 39.75 inches long x 17.50 inches high, this untouched, all-original, single-sided, porcelain, circa 1930-40s sign is an extraordinarily RARE piece of Black American history-- an artifact of the "Jim Crow" era when segregation of the African American race was unfortunately, most commonplace.

The origin of this sign is unknown, but given its very substantial size and weight, it likely once hung as a directional sign in a major bus or railroad station, designating the "WHITES ONLY" area where African-Americans were required to sit or stand.

The subtly convex sign has had no restoration and remains in all-original condition. It bears areas of paint loss, scratching and superficial rusting (some areas larger in scope than others) typical for its age and use as noted in photos. Please view photos for further assessment of the sign's condition. The age and use-related signs of wear do not impact the physical integrity of the sign and are more than appropriate to the age and purpose of the piece.

An utterly phenomenal, extremely RARE, one-of-a-kind, museum-worthy piece of Black American history!

Please take a moment to view the other "Jim Crow" Segregationist Era signs that I currently have the pleasure of offering.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Nostalgia : Advertising : Pre 1900 item #433910 (stock #G550)
Stonegate Antiques
$395.00
Offered for sale is a very rare, circa 1890s, advertisement for “KESSLER’S – SMOOTH AS SILK“ WHISKEY-- shaped in the form of a TOP HAT!

This fabulous advertising piece is made of papier mache’, is painted black, and sports cream-colored lettering on both sides of the hat.

The firm of Julius Kessler Dist. Co., Inc., in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, originated in 1888 and created an American blended whiskey known for its silky smoothness!

The condition of this fab piece is very, very good given its 115++ years of age, with some areas of paint loss and wear (mostly to the top of the hat which is the surface that actually serves as the base for this piece). No structural weakness or damage to the papier mache- a very solid piece that displays beautifully!!

Measures 12”L x 9.5”W x 6”H. An eye-catching, visually appealing, early display advertisement!!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #162986 (stock #BA327)
Stonegate Antiques
$195.00
An unusual piece, this delightful, cloth Mammy Broom Doll from the 1940's measures 12.5 inches high with a total height of 31 inches including the broom.

Mammy's wonderful, smiling face is hand-stitched and her clothes are machine sewn. Her blouse is seersucker, and her head, arms, skirt, apron, and cap are cotton. Her head, arms, and upper torso are stuffed with cotton batting. The natural bristle broom fills out both Mammy's torso and skirt & the wooden broom handle extends upward through her neck and head.

Mammy is in all original condition with no mends or repairs. The structural integrity of the broom remains quite sound, and Mammy, herself, is free of holes and tears. Her once-red skirt has now faded to pink. Her white cotton apron and cap have been cleaned removing nearly all traces of old stains, dirt, and dust. Photo number 2 shows her outfit BEFORE cleaning; all other photos reflect her appearance after cleaning.

A fabulous piece of vintage Black Americana, and a seldom seen form of the Black Mammy Doll!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #383458 (stock #BA479)
Stonegate Antiques
$145.00
Measuring 5 1/2 x 7 1/2, this framed piece of early Black Memorabilia features the hardboard cover only (not the complete book) of "The DARKIES' Painting Book"! Cover depicts 2 jauntily stepping Black children. Color is quite vivid in this very visually-striking piece! Protected in a gold-tone, decorative frame. (Please disregard unavoidable reflections in the glass)

Delightful item!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Historical : Pre 1960 item #113475 (stock #G356)
Stonegate Antiques
$25.00
Measuring 3” in diameter, the patent date indicates that this vintage, NEW ORLEANS MARDI GRAS pin back was manufactured in 1957, by Pictorial Productions, Inc.

It features a vintage, EARLY HOLOGRAM IMAGE, a “moving” Court Jester or Clown, who in a gallant sweeping motion, removes his broad-rimmed hat and takes a grand bow. (Tilt pin slightly to make Jester move.)

Colors: bright, buttery yellow background, jester in dark fuchsia, green and white, and lettering and metal pin back frame in red.

Condition: quite nice for its 60 years of age with light, expected wear to red paint at rim edges and back. NOTE: The piece of tape shown in pics is not part of the pin or attached to it, but was used to prop the piece up to display the moving images.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #383460 (stock #BA483)
Stonegate Antiques
$165.00
Used by the Atlantic and Pacific Tea Company, New York, - the A & P grocery store chain - for advertising purposes, this sizable diecut has been protected in a 12 3/4 x 9 1/2 inch, gold-toned frame.

Vividly colored, this Black Memorabilia themed piece features a smiling black girl seated on a large straw basket while holding 2, smaller-sized, flower-filled straw baskets in each arm. The young girl is nicely attired in a ruffled blue and yellow dress and wears red sandals, white lacy gloves, and a rose-accented, straw bonnet!

The diecut is in excellent condition! An unusual find!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #904440 (stock #BA750)
Stonegate Antiques
$85.00
This 1930s, Art Deco, VIGNY, 2 ounce, Golliwog Perfume Bottle is a rare find! Originally sold by the Fred Harvey stores, this 4 inch tall bottle retains the majority of its Fred Harvey sales sticker on its base. Remnants of perfume are still visible, and the bottle's original paper labels remain in wonderful condition. A delightful addition to one's Golliwog Black Memorabilia collection!
All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #559423 (stock #BA600)
Stonegate Antiques
$350.00
Measuring 6.5 inches long and approximately 4 inches in both width and depth, this wonderfully RARE, Black Americana, Red Cap, Railroad Porter String Holder is in very fine condition with just a sprinkling of white speckling where the black cold paint has worn away.

A stunning and very visually striking piece, it is labeled on back, "Fredericksburg Art Pottery USA", a pottery once located in Fredericksburg, Ohio, manufacturing between 1939-49. The back has 2 original hanging holes for placement on a wall.

Truly in wonderful, vintage condition with no cracks, chips, repairs or repaint! A fabulous addition to one's Black Americana collection!

Please note that the natural outdoor lighting used to photograph this piece has amplified the white paint flecking --the teeny white spots really show up more in these photos than on the actual piece in an indoor setting--- photo number one gives an accurate depiction of appearance.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1266316 (stock #BA913)
Stonegate Antiques
$145.00
Measuring 1 3/4 inches in diameter x 5/16 of an inch high, this rarely-found, circa 1920’s, dexterity game depicts a small black boy with Fez blowing bubbles out of a pipe! The puzzle is quite colorful and is very visually appealing! The puzzle contains 4 tiny white balls of unknown material, that, with the proper manual dexterity, are to be placed in the four bubbles the boy is blowing!

Constructed of tin with a cardboard lithographed image and a glass cover, this game has a mirrored back. The puzzle is in all-original condition with the graphic remaining free of scratches and abrasions. The mirrored back shows evidence of subtle, minor scratching. (Please disregard any light or shiny spots in photos which are due to flash reflection off of the glass.)

A delightful piece of early Black Memorabilia!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #798462 (stock #BA711)
Stonegate Antiques
$195.00
Measuring 11.75 inches high x 8 inches wide, this striking 1950's, ceramic, Black African in a Sea Shell, hanging wall planter is marked on back "House of Venice California".

In lovely condition with age crackling to the backside of the seashell, this stunning piece appears to have never been used for its original purpose as a hanging wall planter. The black paint is in impeccable condition and any white dots that appear in photos are the result of light reflection off of teeny glaze imperfections and are NOT chips, rubs or scratches to the surface. The gold stippling to the seashell is perfect!

The piece has a hole in the back to facilitate wall-mounting or it may be easily displayed on a shelf.

A very seldom found piece of vintage Black Memorabilia that is truly stunning in appearance!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1151416 (stock #BA832)
Stonegate Antiques
$295.00
Measuring 17 inches long, this delightful, folk-art styled, cloth, black Mammy doll was made circa 1920's.

Detailing in construction sets this mammy doll apart! Her creation was very carefully executed through a combination of hand and machine stitching. Mammy was lovingly dressed in clothing made from old, red, black, and white-patterned handkerchiefs, while both her body and her interesting pair of black pantaloons were constructed of old, black stockings. Detailing was clearly important to the creator--an additional and elegant surprise is the cream-colored, cotton petticoat edged with lace!

Mammy's face is hand-embroidered, and she wears brass-colored, plain, hoop earrings. Her body is machine-stitched together and is stuffed with cotton batting.

Mammy is in near perfect condition with the exception of minor wear (not holes) to her stocking-constructed left foot as well as the underside of her right, stocking-constructed hand. (This wear to the fabric may well be the very reason the stockings were used to construct Mammy as they may have been discarded from personal use. Please refer to photos to view wear.)

Mammy is simply full of charm with lovely and creative detailing! A quite difficult-to-find-in-this condition, 80+-year-old, cloth mammy doll!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Nostalgia : School : Pre 1900 item #854496 (stock #G590)
Stonegate Antiques
$55.00
Offered is a group of five, antique paper, hand-personalized and signed, New York Public School student merit awards from the 1840's, each priced separately, and suitable for framing.

All 5 of these artistically-rendered awards were presented to the same student, Maria Royce, and signed by her teacher, Isabella F. McCormick, as well as two representatives of the school committee for "regular and punctual attendance with correct deportment and diligent attention to her studies." Maria obviously was educated in a one room school house given that she had the same teacher over a four year period.

The awards are dated May 1841, May 1842, March 18-- (year inadvertently omitted), June 1842, and January 1844.

The merit awards measure 8 inches wide x 10 inches long and are adorned at the top of the award with a well-executed black line etching of a teacher and her students viewing a large world globe with an elegant school house of formal architecture standing imposingly in the background-- and at the base of the award, a delicate and detailed floral wreath.

The awards are in fine condition with very minor wrinkling to the edges. May 1841 and March 18-- also have minor edge-area foxing that will not be visible once the award is matted and framed.

These early examples of school ephemera are quite rare and would be a fabulous addition to a vintage school memorabilia collection!

As each is priced separately (see photos for pricing), please email us stating the number of items you wish to purchase so that we can customize your order form.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #678434 (stock #BA253)
Stonegate Antiques
$78.00
A wonderful example of hand-crafted Black Americana Folk Art!

This wonderful Depression Era piece features a whimsical 10 inch long cutout figure of a little wooden black mammy with hand-painted “surprised” mouth and eyes! She is dressed in a machine-stitched cotton costume with great yellow ric-rac accenting —a wonderful kerchief on her head, and a cute little apron.

Her feet feature two brass-finish hooks, presumably to either hang keys or pot holders from. Overall condition is fine with minor paint wear to her face as seen in photos--typical of a 70 year-old-piece.

One of my favorite hand-made pieces with true folk art appeal!