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All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #1265967 (stock #BA911)
Stonegate Antiques
$175.00
Measuring approximately 3" x 3", this rarely found tin mechanical toy features a monkey at the unfortunate mercy of a black lady hitting him with a mallet!

Unmarked, the toy was likely produced in post WWII Germany. It is in wonderful, barely-used condition with just the tiniest degree of scratching wherever metal rubs metal during toy movement. To operate the toy, one simply squeezes the metal lever on the back, which causes the woman to hit the poor monkey on the head with a mallet!

A RARE toy with crisp color and which displays wonderfully!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #596313 (stock #BA641B)
Stonegate Antiques
$35.00
This is an authentic signed baseball from former Negro League players Joe Durham of the Chicago American Giants and James Tillman of the Homestead Grays. The ball was signed at an autograph show in March 2006.

A brief history of the Negro League:

African Americans first began to play baseball in the late 1800s on military teams, college teams, and company teams, eventually finding their way to the established professional baseball teams of white players. However, racism and “Jim Crow” laws would force African Americans from these teams by 1900, with black players left to form their own teams.

In 1920, an organized league structure was formed under the guidance of Andrew “Rube” Foster, a former player, manager, and owner for the Chicago American Giants. In a meeting held at the Paseo YMCA in Kansas City, Mo., Foster and several other Midwestern team owners joined to form the Negro National League. Soon, rival leagues formed in Eastern and Southern states, which brought black baseball to major urban centers and to rural countrysides in the U.S., Canada, and Latin America. The Leagues maintained a high level of professional skill and inspired economic development in many black communities.

In 1945, when Major League Baseball’s Brooklyn Dodgers recruited Jackie Robinson from the Kansas City Monarchs, Robinson became the first African American in the modern era to play on a Major League roster. While this historic event was a key moment in baseball and civil rights history, it marked the decline of the Negro Leagues. The best black players began to be recruited for the Major Leagues with their black fans following them, and the last Negro Leagues teams folded in the early 1960s.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Nostalgia : School : Pre 1960 item #1157149 (stock #G626)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
A fabulous find for the newly graduated school psychologist or special education teacher- a 55 year old version of the very well known intelligence assessment, the Stanford Binet Intelligence Scale, Form L-M, published by the Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston!!

Housed within its original "leatherette" suitcase which measures 15 inches x 10.75 inches x 4.25 inches, this 1960 Revision test kit appears to be nearly complete with all original test contents: test manual, small and large, printed, spiral-bound card materials, and its many assorted and varied manipulatives that are housed in individual divider boxes, some retaining the original covers! One manipulative, a small plastic chair, is broken although most of its broken pieces remain within the kit, and an extra, partially complete, Form Board is also present. The original plastic case handle remains although it was broken and re-glued at sometime previous to our ownership. At this point, the handle should be deemed as purely decorative and not for actual use. Discovered in Massachusetts, the assessment kit is presented for sale as found and has likely seen considerable use over the years! In perusing through its contents, one takes a fascinating walk through intelligence assessment history!

This 1960 Revision is the 3rd revision of this test which was first published in France in 1905 by the French psychologist, Alfred Binet, whom the French government commissioned with developing a method of identifying "intellectually deficient" children for their placement in special education programs. In 1916, at Stanford University, the psychologist, Lewis Terman, released a revised examination which became known as the "Stanford–Binet test". The development of the Stanford–Binet Intelligence Scales initiated the modern field of intelligence testing and was one of the first examples of an adaptive test. The 2nd revision of the test was published in 1937, and a selection of materials from the 1937 scale were deemed essential enough to be included in the 1960 Revision assessment.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1920 item #326332 (stock #BA151)
Stonegate Antiques
$295.00
Measuring 4 inches long x 3 inches wide, this extraordinarily RARE Aunt Jemima Pancake Flour Advertising String Puzzle Toy dates to the 1905-1916 time period when it was used by the R. T. Davis Mill Company of St. Joseph, Missouri, to promote their product!

The puzzle is constructed of a cardboard paper material with Aunt Jemima’s image lithographed on the front and product advertising on the back. This puzzle toy was a “give-away” item--- customers could write away for the “free” puzzle by sending two 2 cent stamps for a “set of Aunt Jemima and her Pickaninny Dolls”.

Aunt Jemima is in all ORIGINAL condition and has no age imperfection to speak of other than minor creasing near the three string holes, undoubtedly created when someone long ago attempted to solve the puzzle---“separate the two cardboard pieces without untying the string!”

This RARELY found piece of early Black Memorabilia and/or Aunt Jemima advertising would be fabulous framed between two pieces of glass! A must-have for the serious Black Americana collector! These Aunt Jemima paper string advertising puzzles are simply not seen anymore- they are very rarely found in today's market due to the fragile nature of their composition!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #854526 (stock #BA249)
Stonegate Antiques
$85.00
Offered is a circa 1950's, Bermuda Mammy Doll who quite elegantly balances a woven basket of fabric-fruit upon her head! She is in excellent condition. Her machine-stitched body is constructed of fabric that has been tightly stuffed with cotton. She features a hand-painted face, yarn hair and darling button earrings. She measures 10.25 inches tall. Both her arms and legs are jointed, and thus, movable, but her legs have limited range of motion--she can "walk", but her legs cannot be adjusted to a seated position. Her clothes are also machined stitched, and her apron is hand-painted "BERMUDA". She even wears white under-drawers! A very sweet doll!
All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1222839 (stock #BA875)
Stonegate Antiques
$115.00
Measuring 3 inches long x 2 inches wide, this vintage, 1930's, advertising, lithographed-metal, pocket mirror remains in all-original condition (see photos). This is not a reproduction!

Given away by the Merrick Thread Company as a free advertising premium to encourage the purchase of its product, this mirror depicts a rather confident black boy hanging from a single strand of Merrick thread while dangling above the open jaws of a hungry alligator! At the base of the mirror the caption reads, "Fooled Dis Time Cully Dis Cotton Aint Gwine To Break".

A delightful Black Americana Advertising piece!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #793266 (stock #BA239)
Stonegate Antiques
$185.00
This vintage 1938 Patent date, African-American Pappy Marionette made by the Hazelle Puppet Company is in wonderful, never-used condition!

Rarely found in this pristine condition, the head, hands and shoes are constructed of tenite, which was an early hard plastic. This African-American male pappy is 14 inches long and is all-original, even retaining his original strings and wooden "airplane" marionette controls. The latest patent date on the "airplane" label indicates that this puppet was produced in 1938. His smiling face is wonderful--and his life-like wool hair add to his character!

The Hazelle Company was a puppet-making company located in Kansas City, Missouri. The company began making hand puppets and marionettes in 1932, and it continued operations for the next 43 years. The founder, Hazelle Rollins, passed away in 1984, nine years after the company closed its doors.

A unique opportunity to acquire a superb, vintage, Black Memorabilia Marionette! Please see the companion Hazelle Little Black Girl and Boy Hand Puppets as well as the other 3 African-American themed Marionettes also offered! Photos of the 4 Hazelle Marionette puppets currently offered for purchase are featured here.

Please note that any white spots seen in the photos of the marionette are the result of photo flash glare, not a condition problem.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Nostalgia : Advertising : Pre 1930 item #488263 (stock #G220)
Stonegate Antiques
$55.00
Measuring 9 inches in width x 3 inches in height x 1.75 inches deep, this vintage 1920’s, country store advertising display reads, “We Give And Redeem Gold Stamps”. A very unusual find!

Black with hand-painted, gold lettering, this interesting advertising display would sit nicely on a shelf! In fine, all-original condition with the expected nicks and superficial surface scratches.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1273736 (stock #BA874, BA919)
Stonegate Antiques
$225.00
Measuring 9 inches high, these delightful examples of Folk Art styling, are two of a series of Black cloth character dolls made in Alabama in the 1930’s by unknown craftsmen/women. It has been speculated that their creation was encouraged through President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's Depression era program, the Work Projects Administration (WPA), in existence from 1936-1940.

The female doll depicts a black mammy out for a stroll with black umbrella in hand. This gentlewoman wears a red and white polka dot kerchief on her head covering most of her gray hair and has embroidered facial features – characteristic of these dolls. Also characteristic of this type of doll is a small square of asphalt shingle glued to the feet to serve as a stand. This doll has (not uncommonly) lost hers long ago, but a bit of the original shingle is still attached to the soles of both shoes. Clothing, with the exception of her neutral-striped knit-fabric sweater, is machine-sewn cotton with careful detailing right down to the red hankie poking out of her apron pocket. She also wears gold hoop earrings! Her body, which is well-stuffed to be anatomically correct, is black cotton fabric stuffed with cotton batting.

The white haired and bearded male country gentleman doll is similarly attired in machine-sewn cotton britches with a patch at the knee and suspenders along with a tan cotton striped shirt and red kerchief around his neck. His hat is constructed of cranberry-colored felt. Under his right arm, he holds a nicely crafted chicken that has sustained a tiny bit of fabric loss to its face. His left arm once held a wooden walking stick which is long gone, but alternatively, he now uses his free hand to hold the arm of his lovely lady! His asphalt shingle is also missing with remnants evident of it present on the soles of his shoes.

Two very special dolls that represent a snapshot of history, capturing the lives of poor southern black folk of the Depression era.

The dolls are priced at $225.00 each, or they may both be purchased as a pair at the discounted price of $395.00. Please note that no further advertised discount is applicable to this special paired pricing offer.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #365284 (stock #BA425)
Stonegate Antiques
$58.00
Measuring 23 3/4 inches long x 15 ¼ inches wide, this very charming, circa 1940-1950’s, machine-stitched, linen towel bears a very delightful, colorful stencil of the well-known Black Memorabilia character, Little Brown Koko eating a watermelon! In excellent, spotless condition, the towel may be folded and framed if desired! A great companion piece for those who collect Little Brown Koko books!
All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #601171 (stock #BA640)
Stonegate Antiques
$1,275.00
This fabulous and completely unique, one-of-a-kind, wooden, Folk Art sculpture by a Lewes, Delaware artist depicting a Black Man comes with an historical provenance!

This wonderful piece, hand-crafted almost entirely of wood, measures 16.5 inches long and 10.5 inches tall and depicts an interesting black male figure taking a break from wood chopping by enjoying a luscious piece of watermelon! To his right resides his ax resting in a tree trunk and to his left is a round, corked, glass bottle of whiskey resting on another tree stump. A charming scene!

Attached to the base of the sculpture is written testimony which states the following:

"From the Historical Society in Lewes, Delaware. 1920/30 Folk Art from a (white) Lewes artist who did not sign his work because of potential repercussion."

A fabulously unique piece of historical Afro-American Folk Art!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Nostalgia : Advertising : Pre 1910 item #428772 (stock #G38)
Stonegate Antiques
$135.00
Measuring a diminutive 2 inches in diameter, this intricately-detailed, colorfully lithographed, celluloid-faced advertising pocket mirror is in mint condition!

The pastoral image features a country maiden leading a cow from the woods while holding a can of Horlick's Malted Milk.

Imprinted on the cow's side is the following, "Ask for Horlick's at all Fountains and Hotels."

Around the circumference of the mirror, the product is further advertised:

"This maiden fair was dressed in silk,
She drinks the Horlick's Malted Milk."

" Tea of coffee it does replace,
In Health or Sickness,
Wins the Race."

Original mirrored backing is in very fine condition with just a few very minute , superficial scratches. Marked in microscopically written print ob bottom edge: The Whitemead & Hoag Company, Newark, New Jersey.

A beautiful little advertising piece!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #611218 (stock #BA643B)
Stonegate Antiques
$625.00
A simply fabulous and extremely rare, circa 1870-1880's, solid brass, Black Americana SLAVE FACE BOWL!! A striking image!!

Prominent facial features- eyes and brows, nose, cheekbones, lips and teeth -and tight curly hair rise from the surface of the bowl. The bowl is rather heavy for its diminutive size and has no markings. Measures 4 inches in diameter and 1.5 inches high. Condition is excellent with some tarnishing that may be cleaned if desired; our preference was to offer this 140+ year old piece in as found condition.

An outstanding and highly collectible offering to add to one's advanced Black Memorabilia collection!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Nostalgia : School : Pre 1960 item #1242378 (stock #G632)
Stonegate Antiques
$18.00
These wonderful, circa late 1950-early 1960's, TRU-TONE No Roll, school or art crayons manufactured by the Milton Bradley Company of Springfield, Massachusetts, are in mint condition! The crayons are unused and are all original! The box measures 4.5 inches tall x 4.5 inches wide x 1/2 inch deep.

An absolutely wonderful addition to one's School or Artist Memorabilia collection!

Also pictured are two other mint condition, unused, boxed, school crayons that are currently offered for sale. The group of three make a charming, visual display!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1910 item #1198235 (stock #B275)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD--VERY RARE!
Presented as an historical and cultural artifact, this extraordinarily RARE, very scarcely found, cloth book entitled Ten Little Niggers with Music was published in London, circa 1904, by Dean's Rag Book Co. Ltd. This registered issue is the very early No. 82 and was patented in Great Britain, Germany and the United States. The book measures 8.50 inches long x 6.75 inches wide.

The book tells the infamous story of ten little African-American boys who are gradually eliminated in number via one circumstance after another--most utterly horrid-- choking to death, chopping himself in half, being crushed by a bear, being swallowed by a red herring, etc, ending with the last boy sadly living all alone, a circumstance he happily remedies by getting married.

Originally published in 1868 under the Title of “The Ten Little Indians,” this poem was used during minstrel shows, which oftentimes were traveling acts, performed by white actors in blackface following the Civil War. The following year, the poem was adapted to this overtly horrid, racist rendition, replacing the word Indians with “Nigger” in both minstrel shows, printed sheet music, and children’s nursery rhyme books. This version married the stereotypes of violence and ignorance within the African-American population with the intent of villainizing freed black males while simultaneously allowing violence acts to befall the black characters portrayed in the rhyme.

This 109 year old book remains in all-original, very good condition with no alterations or repairs. Original binding and stitching remain tight and in tact with exception of a one inch long tear to binding at base (see photo). Illustrated by R. J. (James) Williams, the interior illustrations remain very brightly colored; front and back covers show some soiling and fading of color. A small section of cloth is missing from the lower left corner of the front cover, and on the second page, there is some tearing to the cloth with missing fiber (see photos of both). Light foxing throughout.

In truly remarkable condition for its age and in consideration of its all-cloth construction. This title is very RARELY found in today's market and is an absolute cornerstone piece in any serious Black Memorabilia collection!

To view other versions of this book presently available for separate purchase, please type the words "ten little" into the SEARCH box on our home page.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 2000 item #451878 (stock #BA560)
Stonegate Antiques
$28.00
Offered is an authentic signed baseball from former Negro League player CLIFFORD LAYTON. The ball was signed at an autograph show and is dated 4-15-05.

A brief history of the Negro League:

African-Americans first began to play baseball in the late 1800s on military teams, college teams, and company teams, eventually finding their way to the established professional baseball teams of white players. However, racism and “Jim Crow” laws would force African-Americans from these teams by 1900, with black players left to form their own teams.

In 1920, an organized league structure was formed under the guidance of Andrew “Rube” Foster, a former player, manager, and owner for the Chicago American Giants. In a meeting held at the Paseo YMCA in Kansas City, Mo., Foster and several other Midwestern team owners joined to form the Negro National League. Soon, rival leagues formed in Eastern and Southern states, which brought black baseball to major urban centers and to rural countrysides in the U.S., Canada, and Latin America. The Leagues maintained a high level of professional skill and inspired economic development in many black communities.

In 1945, when Major League Baseball’s Brooklyn Dodgers recruited Jackie Robinson from the Kansas City Monarchs, Robinson became the first African-American in the modern era to play on a Major League roster. While this historic event was a key moment in baseball and civil rights history, it marked the decline of the Negro Leagues. The best black players began to be recruited for the Major Leagues with their black fans following them, and the last Negro Leagues teams folded in the early 1960s.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1266374 (stock #BA916)
Stonegate Antiques
$275.00
Manufactured circa 1920's by the Wurts Creation Company, this scarcely-found, Black Chef, kitchen collectible doubles as both a string holder and a grocery list memo board!

Constructed of painted wood that is nailed and glued together, this vintage collectible retains quite a few of its original but yellowed-with-age grocery shopping list pages. The holder/board retains a ball of string and a stub of an older, red pencil. It also has an inkwell cut-out that would have accommodated a bottle of ink; presumably, an inkwell pen once resided beside it versus the current pencil.

The holder/board remains in all original condition with no repaint or repair. The black chef is not painted on but is a decal--all original. The pale blue paint has appropriate, minor, age-related wear as noted in photos.

Has great visual appeal and displays wonderfully!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #676629 (stock #073(BA))
Stonegate Antiques
$68.00
Measuring just 5 inches high, this darling piece of Black Memorabilia is as functional as it is cute! Featuring a painted bisque black boy eating the stereotypical watermelon, he sits on a small pin cushion in the shade of a tree constructed of a genuine cotton boll!

The bisque was likely made in Japan and then shipped to the USA for assembly as a Southern States souvenir piece. In wonderful condition with just the tiniest bit of wear to the paint here and there--appears to have never been used as a pincushion.