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All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #861176 (stock #BA316)
Stonegate Antiques
$15.00
Offered are a group of eleven, Black Memorabilia postcards in wonderful, unused condition of 1930's through 1950's vintage, priced at $15.00 each or all 11 for $140.00.

While some photos may appear a bit blurry, this is a function of photography and not condition. All postcards are crisp and clear! The six comical cartoon postcards are much more brightly and vividly colored than the photos depict. The four photo postcards also feature titles describing their subjects.

A delightful grouping that would be much-appreciated framed!

As each is priced separately (see photos for pricing), please email us stating which item you wish to purchase so that we can customize your order form.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #1113134 (stock #BA804)
Stonegate Antiques
$345.00
Offered is a bucolic and beautifully-colored, medium-folio, copyrighted 1854, Nathaniel Currier, New York, lithograph entitled, "Catching A Trout". The image measures approximately 10" x 14", and depicts a fancily-dressed African-American man "netting" the trout caught by one of the two well-dressed gentleman enjoying a relaxing day of fishing. This Currier + Ives lithograph is infrequently found, and is quite highly collectible.

Condition of the litho is considered very good given the rich coloration that remains. Some minor wear does exist: 2 small tears measuring less than 1/2 inch each on either side border edge-- one in the trees on the right side and the other on the left side in the water. There are several teeny holes in the sky to the right of the bearded gentleman's fishing pole as well as one single hole in the black gentleman's hair. (Please see photos.) Some wear to the border at top as shown in photos.

Despite the noted imperfections, this lithograph displays beautifully, with rich color and crisp lines. It presently resides in an early 1920's frame without glass; it requires appropriate re-framing with acid-free materials to continue to preserve its historic importance.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #930447 (stock #BA763)
Stonegate Antiques
$195.00
Measuring just under 2 inches high, this cast iron, Black, Uncle Sam pencil sharpener was made in Occupied Japan in 1948. In wonderful condition with very minor paint loss due to light use, this piece is stamped on the backside of Uncle Sam's head: "Made in Occupied Japan".

A wonderful and rarely found piece of Black Americana!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #335804 (stock #BA301)
Stonegate Antiques
$45.00
Measuring 3 inches high, this delightfully sweet, circa 1940’s, black bisque baby boy is in mint condition! Excellent paint, with not a chip or flake to be found! Dressed in painted blue shorts and white shirt, this little darling even retains his three, original yarn pigtails! Incised on back: JAPAN. A very, very charming piece of vintage Black Memorabilia!
All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1224712 (stock #BA886)
Stonegate Antiques
$395.00
In the mid-1800's, an unknown artist painted the face of a young Black boy in warm, soft colors, and unbeknown to the artist, forever immortalized the young boy's image! Since that time a variety of items were been produced in the image of the "Young Black boy with the Torn Hat" or "Johnny Griffin".

This circa 1920-30's Johnny Griffin tie rack is constructed in solid brass. It remains functional for such use today; however, only two of the five original tie hooks remain.

It is in all original condition with fabulous patina- not a reproduction- no replaced parts- and measures 13 inches long.

Johnny Griffin Black Americana collectibles should form the cornerstone of any serious Black Memorabilia collection!

To see all of the Johnny Griffin items currently available for sale, simply type “Johnny Griffin” into the search box on our web home page.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1920 item #793291 (stock #BA695)
Stonegate Antiques
$595.00
Measuring 6.25 inches long x 5 inches wide, this well detailed, circa 1910, brass ashtray depicts a smiling black male native reclining on a stylized seashell.

In fabulous condition with 90+ years of all original surface patina, this phenomenal piece is very highly detailed and displays wonderfully! It authentically depicts the highly fashionable Art Nouveau styling which was so wildly popular at the turn of the 20th century. This brass ashtray promotes the English settlement of the CONGO on the African continent, and thus, the words "CONGO" are impressed across the native's chest. The earliest version of this ashtray was crafted in BRONZE did not feature the Congo label across the native's chest.

A must-have piece for the sophisticated Black Americana collector!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 2000 item #451878 (stock #BA560)
Stonegate Antiques
$28.00
Offered is an authentic signed baseball from former Negro League player CLIFFORD LAYTON. The ball was signed for me at an autograph show and is dated 4-15-05.

A brief history of the Negro League:

African-Americans first began to play baseball in the late 1800s on military teams, college teams, and company teams, eventually finding their way to the established professional baseball teams of white players. However, racism and “Jim Crow” laws would force African-Americans from these teams by 1900, with black players left to form their own teams.

In 1920, an organized league structure was formed under the guidance of Andrew “Rube” Foster, a former player, manager, and owner for the Chicago American Giants. In a meeting held at the Paseo YMCA in Kansas City, Mo., Foster and several other Midwestern team owners joined to form the Negro National League. Soon, rival leagues formed in Eastern and Southern states, which brought black baseball to major urban centers and to rural countrysides in the U.S., Canada, and Latin America. The Leagues maintained a high level of professional skill and inspired economic development in many black communities.

In 1945, when Major League Baseball’s Brooklyn Dodgers recruited Jackie Robinson from the Kansas City Monarchs, Robinson became the first African-American in the modern era to play on a Major League roster. While this historic event was a key moment in baseball and civil rights history, it marked the decline of the Negro Leagues. The best black players began to be recruited for the Major Leagues with their black fans following them, and the last Negro Leagues teams folded in the early 1960s.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #795232 (stock #BA204)
Stonegate Antiques
$195.00
Measuring a total length of 26 inches including strings, this fabulous, late 1940's, black character marionette is in wonderful, never-played-with condition!

The puppet, itself, is 14 inches tall and is colorfully dressed in blue and white checked pants, red shoes, orange and whit polka dot shirt, straw hat and red patterned neck scarf.

The puppet's face is composition and bears evidence of some age-related crackling as noted in photos. He has a tiny piece if composition missing on the left side of his neck partially covered by his neck scarf, so it is very difficult to notice. He bears a manufacturer stamp on the bottom of his right foot, but it is partial and unreadable. His hands which hold colorful pink straw maracas are a heavy molded plastic.

The puppet is free of stains, dirt and odor. He retains his original black strings and wooden airplane controller!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #950251 (stock #BA908)
Stonegate Antiques
$795.00
Measuring 10.25 inches wide x 4.50 inches high, this untouched, all-original, double-sided, solid, one half-inch-thick-wooden, circa 1920s sign is an extraordinarily RARE piece of Black American history-- an artifact of the "Jim Crow" era when segregation of the African American race was unfortunately, most commonplace.

The origin of this sign is unknown, but it once hung on either the interior of a bus or railroad car designating the section of the bus or rail car where African-Americans were required to sit. One side reads “FOR WHITES” and the other side reads “FOR COLORED” thus separating the two races on public conveyance vehicles-- segregating the African-Americans to the back of the vehicle.

This historically significant sign retains its original metal hanger and is in all-original condition. It has had no restoration and bears some paint loss and scratching typical of its age and use as noted in photos. The “For White” side has significant paint loss from the actual lettering although this side of the sign is still quite "readable". The "For Colored" side is in very nice condition with very minimal paint loss to the actual lettering. This side of the sign displays exceedingly well! The age-related signs of wear do not impact the physical integrity of the sign and are more than appropriate to the age and purpose of the piece.

An utterly phenomenal, extremely RARE, one-of-a-kind, museum-worthy piece of Black American history!

Please take a moment to view the other "Jim Crow" Segregationist Era signs that I currently have the pleasure of offering.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1365943 (stock #BA929)
Stonegate Antiques
$695.00
Offered is an ULTRA-RARE, UNCUT, 1924, COMPLETE SET of the FOUR members of the Aunt Jemima Rag Doll Family---Aunt Jemima, Uncle Mose (Aunt Jemima's Husband-- so labeled on his upper back), Little Diana, and Wade Davis.

The dolls were conceptualized as advertising pieces and were only obtainable from the Aunt Jemima Mills of St. Joseph, Missouri, in return of 25 cents in stamps or coins along with 4 box tops or backs from select Aunt Jemima products (proofs of purchase!). Dolls were then shipped promptly, postpaid upon receipt!

I have never come upon a complete, uncut set!!! Rather, these dolls are more typically found as "singletons" here and there by chance-- already cut, sewn, stuffed and played with as opposed to the pristine, complete, uncut versions offered here.

The set is in quite wonderful condition given its 93 years of age. The color of each doll remains amazingly crisp and brilliant! Mild foxing is noted here and there throughout. Fold lines are evident as well; HOWEVER, it must be noted that these fold marks are the result of ORIGINAL PACKAGING and SHIPMENT as these linen pieces were carefully folded to fit within a simple, small to medium-sized envelope when mailed out from the factory.

Additionally, a prior owner likely had framed these pieces as mild tape staining is noted on the backsides of each piece of linen, with some mild, tape-stain, bleed-through noted at the feet of Uncle Mose and Aunt Jemima on the front side. The set is truly in fine condition given its age and was obviously prized and very well cared for over the years.

Each figure is printed on its own, separate piece of linen. Aunt Jemima measures 10.5" wide by 35" long; Uncle Mose measures 10" wide by 35" long; Diana and Wade each measure 12.5" wide by 17.5" long.

A rare opportunity for the advanced collector to acquire an uncut, complete set of 1924, Aunt Jemima Family Advertising Rag Dolls!

This offering will be sold as a complete set ONLY; offers for individual pieces will not be entertained.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Pre 1940 item #676630 (stock #BA450)
Stonegate Antiques
$78.00
A wonderful example of hand-crafted Black Americana Folk Art!

This wonderful Depression Era piece features a whimsical 10 inch long cutout figure of a little wooden black girl with hand-painted smiling mouth and eyes! She is dressed in a hand-stitched cotton costume that has been stuffed with scrap fabric.

Her feet feature two brass-finish hooks, presumably to either hang keys or pot holders from. Her ears each have a punched out hole--whether this is functional or purely decorative remains a mystery. A small brass hoop threaded through a piece of fabric which was then tacked to the back of the girl's head facilitates hanging on a wall. Overall condition is fine with age-related soiling to the dress and minor paint wear typical of a 70 year-old-piece.

One of my favorite hand-made pieces with true folk art appeal!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #853318 (stock #BA743)
Stonegate Antiques
$425.00
In the mid-1800's, an unknown artist painted the face of a young Black boy in warm, soft colors, and unbeknown to the artist, forever immortalized the young boy's image! Since that time a variety of items were been produced in the image of the "Young Black boy with the Torn Hat" or "Johnny Griffin".

This circa 1920-30's Johnny Griffin inkwell is constructed in solid brass and has a hole for both placement of pen and glass insert for ink. This piece is offered without the pen and glass ink insert.

It is in all original condition with delightful patina- not a reproduction- no replaced parts- and measures 6 inches long x 3.25 inches wide and 2 1/2 inches high. It does not retain any marking other than a mold number 4557.

Johnny Griffin Black Americana collectibles should form the cornerstone of any serious Black Memorabilia collection!

To see all of the Johnny Griffin items currently available for sale, simply type “Johnny Griffin” into the search box on our web home page.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #808062 (stock #BA727)
Stonegate Antiques
$575.00
An extraordinarily RARE 19th CENTURY piece of Black Americana advertising featuring a fabulous graphic of 2 young African American painters holding a "White-Wash Boy's Hydrated Lime" box.

This product was produced by the lime manufacturers, Hatmaker and Place, of Canaan, Connecticut, in the late 1800s. This small company was located within a large "lime belt" that stretched from Connecticut to Vermont. Back in the day, lime powder mixed with water was quite commonly used to "white wash" or paint numerous surfaces, and it was also used as a medicinal disinfectant! The manufacture of lime from marble was one of the earliest and most successful mineral industries in Connecticut, with historical records dating the establishment of the first CT lime manufactory to 1722.

Given its age and the fragility of paper, condition of this wonderful box is quite good. The lower portion of the back side of the box evidences light surface wear with some of the printing on the lower portion of the box worn away as a result. The front of the box has a 3.25 inch long tear which resulted in the loss of the lime powder from the box.

This early piece of Black Americana advertising is EXCEEDINGLY RARE and may well be a ONE-OF-A-Kind item! The Hatmaker and Place Company was one of a number of very small manufactories located within the "lime belt" that were ALL bought out and immediately closed down by a wealthy group of investors who then created and incorporated the mammoth monopoly, The New England Lime Company, early in 1902.

This fabulous piece of Black Americana is NOT to be missed by the serious collector!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #334068 (stock #BA370)
Stonegate Antiques
$145.00
Measuring approximately 3 1/2 inches long x 2 1/4 inches wide x 2 inches high, this adorable pair of circa 1950’s, Japanese made, salt and pepper shakers remain in excellent condition complete with original corks!

Perched upon corn cobs, a cute pair of Black African Natives happily guard their trove of salt and pepper. The pepper shaker is stamped “JAPAN” on its base.

Some appropriate, age-related crazing is evident here and there on this colorfully painted, absolutely darling pair which display beautifully!

Please take a moment to view the companion salt and pepper shakers also available for purchase and priced separately--2 little black boys perched on carrots (photo offered here for your convenience).

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #365759 (stock #BA527)
Stonegate Antiques
$125.00
Measuring 8 1/2 inches wide x 11 3/4 inches long, this brightly colored, all original, 1930’s era, Little Black Sambo Puzzle by Fern Bisel Peat is in very good condition! This particular puzzle attracts additional interest due to the unusual, geometric, highly angular cut of the individual puzzle pieces- suggesting a very strong Art Deco influence! Additionally, this rendition of Little Black Sambo depicts Sambo with more Asian-like facial features making this puzzle a very unique find!

Ready to be framed, the puzzle has retained all of the brilliance of its original colors and also sports the artist signature of Fern Bisel Peat in the upper right hand corner. Slight and subtle edge wear to some puzzle pieces as noted in photo. A nice addition to one’s Little Black Sambo collection!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #404205 (stock #BA504)
Stonegate Antiques
$245.00
Measuring 13 inches high, this delightful, hand-made, brother and sister pair of Black cloth dolls were made circa 1940's, by "Roxie" of Asheville, North Carolina, as attested to by the dollmaker's tag sewn on the brother's backside.

Both dolls are in near perfect condition with the exception of a tiny teardrop mark under brother's left eye and a tiny hole next to sister's left side of face on her hairline. Detailing is very sweet with nicely embroidered facial features and color-coordinated, machine-stitched clothing. Hair is authentic looking made of fuzzy wool yarn-- brother's hair is curly and nubby--- sister's is done in a head full of bow-tied pigtails! Bodies are machine-stitched, brown cotton that are each stuffed with cotton batting.

A pair of cuties!!!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Decorations : Holiday : Ornaments : Pre 1900 item #1216421 (stock #BA869)
Stonegate Antiques
$1,995.00
Once part of the Middle Passage Museum benefactor's inventory, these authentic and extraordinarily RARE, Slave Ship shackles have been de-accessioned from the personal collection of the museum's anonymous Georgia benefactor who is cited below.

These iron, hand-forged, 19th century slave ship shackles were purchased back in the early 1960’s out of a family estate in New Orleans, Louisiana, whose 18th and 19th century ancestors were involved in the slave trade. The shackles remain all-original and untouched with fifteen very heavy chain links that vary in size, measuring a total of 40 inches in length when positioned in a straight line. The cuff size is enormous with diameter measurements of 4.75 and 4.25 inches each; the heft and weight of each cuff is quite impressive. This very weighty set was designed to immobilize when the two circular links were attached to another locking shackle on the interior wall of the ship. An utterly horrible, tangible testament to the malevolence of slavery.

The anonymous museum benefactor from Georgia kept this particular set aside from those items he had planned to donate to the Middle Passage Museum due to the rarity in opportunity of acquiring slave ship shackles---the only set he acquired in his many years of collecting which began in the early 1950's before the collectible field of Black Americana was popular or even socially or politically acceptable.

Also currently offered for sale and priced separately are a rarely found, 19thC Slave Rattle Shackle out of the Charleston, South Carolina area and a set of early 19th century, child/young adolescent - size, Slave Crab Rattle Shackles. Please type the word "shackles" in the search box on our home page to find these sets of shackles.

The Middle Passage Museum was the dream of Jim and Mary Anne Petty of Mississippi as well as that of an anonymous Georgian benefactor who had together compiled a collection of slave artifacts numbering over 15,000 pieces and who had hoped to find a permanent site in Mobile, Alabama, for their museum. While they formed a non-profit organization to raise funds for their hoped-for museum, their dream was never realized.

In a 2003 statement, Jim Petty remarked, "The importance of the exhibit of these artifacts is to understand the harshness of what slavery and segregation was all about. The items in the exhibit remind us of the terrible heinousness of slavery. Viewing the collection can be very emotional, but it is a tool through which we can understand, honor and respect a great culture. We want to realize that out of slavery, a great culture emerged, and carried on, and continued to strive for a better life regardless of the adverse conditions that were placed upon them."

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #904409 (stock #BA851)
Stonegate Antiques
$475.00
This rarely found, 1937, tin, wind-up, DOUBLE JITTER-BUG Mechanical Dancing Toy was made by the Buffalo Toy & Tool Works. The Buffalo Toy & Tools Works was located in Buffalo, New York, and was established in 1924.

The toy is in very fine, working condition. When wound, the black dancers bob up and down, moving their hinged legs about and swinging their arms. The dancer's heads, bodies, and arms are constructed of flat tin, while their legs and feet are three dimensional. Other than a few light scratches here and there, the surface lithography and paint is in fabulous condition.

The toy measures 8” tall and 5 ½” wide. Marked with “MADE IN U.S.A.” on the back of the dancer's jackets as well as "MADE IN USA" and "PAT 2072308" (Patent Year 1937) on the bottom of the toy base.