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All Items : Antiques : Instruments and Implements : Sports : Pre 1900 item #1403756 (stock #G645)
Stonegate Antiques
$2,450.00
Offered is an extremely scarce, C1860s, United Kingdom Maker, Long Nose, Long Spoon, Wood Golf Club with original finish! It measures a formidable 44 inches from the heel to the end of the shaft! What is most intriguing about this club is the modestly angled 6 inch club face which showcases the dramatic curve.

This club actually presents a number of qualities that indicate it may, in fact, be an example of pre-1860s craftsmanship: : LENGTH of the face is 6 inches. The DEPTH of the face is 1 1/8 inches max. The face is SMOOTH and CURVED, and the club head is shaped in the form of a TEARDROP. The club is UNMARKED. The neck is slightly thin at just over 3/4 inches--- all indicators of an early, pre-1860s club!

This amazing club sports most of its original varnish surface and is offered in "as found" condition. The darkening of the finish results in a wonderfully rich patina. The club displays an enchanting presence owing to the gently-sculpted angling of the face. The sole of the club is without the usual ram's horn which was the typical norm, making this particular club that much more intriguing and quite unusual!!! I have not been able to find reference to clubs that were made in this fashion. RARE!!!

The early golfer must have been quite robust and sturdy as this heavy club face is one that most folks today would have a difficult time keeping "square" at impact. Long spoon clubs were used off of grassy surfaces which accounts for the very nice condition of this beauty. Besides the unobtrusive, expected scuff marks on the sole, there is only one tiny, barely-noticeable chip on the leading edge of the club face at the sole, consistent with hitting something other than a grassy surface!

The lead on the back of the club has been partially removed to customize it for the golfer. The slightly warped hickory shaft is undamaged and sports a warm, honey-colored surface. The leather grip was expertly replaced many, many years ago and has signs of honorable wear.

The skills of the craftsman are most apparent when the club is viewed from the top. While unmarked, this club displays the form of the exceptional, highly-skilled, UK club makers of the 19th century. According to author and golf history expert, Jeffrey B. Ellis, unsigned, long-nosed golf clubs were the norm in the pre-1870 era.

This rare, antique, hand-wrought, golf club was recently acquired from the estate of a gentleman who had restored and collected golf clubs for 7 decades! His family, while settling his estate, remarked that he had "paid crazy prices for some of his collection!". This prized, rare club is certain to have been included in that category!

A phenomenal, rarely-found example of 19th century craftsmanship, and a tangible example of exemplary golfing history.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1837 VR item #1469991 (stock #BA974)
Stonegate Antiques
$1,995.00
These authentic and extraordinarily RARE, hand-forged, wrought iron, Slave Ship Ankle Shackles were de-accessioned from a private collection. Ankle shackles such as these were used to restrain and imprison kidnapped Africans below decks in the slaver ships' holds during what is known as the ‘Middle Passage’, the brutal voyage endured by captured Africans from the West Coast of Africa to enslavement in the Americas- the second portion of what was known as the transatlantic slave trade.

While the precise age of this late 18th to early 19th century old shackle is unknown, this type of ankle shackle has been documented to have been in use as far back as the 1780's by English slave traders, and was likely in continued use up until the 1860 onset of America's Civil War. In 2015, the International Slavery Museum in Liverpool, England, acquired a set of ankle shackles identical to the set offered here. In referring to the museum's acquisition, the museum's Head, Dr Richard Benjamin, stated the following:

“A similar pair of shackles was purchased in Liverpool by the campaigner Thomas Clarkson as evidence against the transatlantic slave trade. They were presented in front of Privy Council in 1788 as part of its enquiry into the transatlantic slave trade. An engraving of the shackles with a detailed description also appeared in Clarkson’s antislavery pamphlet."

These hand-forged, wrought iron ankle shackles remain in all-original and untouched condition, measuring approximately 11.75 inches in length. The cuff sizes vary slightly ranging from approximate lengths of 3.75 to 4 inches and approximate widths from 2.75 to 3 inches, a set likely used on a female slave. The shackles can be described as consisting of a wrought iron bolt with a pair of loops slid onto it via holes in both ends of each loop. One end of the iron bar is fixed closed by a triangular-shaped flange large enough to prevent the loops from being removed from the bar. The other end of the bar ends in a circular "eye" that is secured closed by a hand-wrought circular "lock washer" inserted at the time the shackles were applied.

An utterly gruesome, tangible testament to the malevolence and horrors of slavery and the transatlantic slave trade.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1437176 (stock #BA953)
Stonegate Antiques
$1,275.00
Measuring 26.5" long x 13.75" wide, this fabulous, one-of-a-kind segregation sign is felt to be circa 1930s.

The sign with its flat black background, features a decorative free-hand, skill-fully executed, corner-looped edge design in old white paint advertising: SLEEPING ROOM FOR RENT.

Beneath the words 'FOR RENT', the words "WHITE ONLY" have been covered over with a layer of similar-colored background paint. Both words are still visible beneath this layer of paint with the word "WHITE" being most readily visualized.

I believe that this "paint-over" can be easily, professionally removed, and I toyed with the idea of having this done, but then felt that I should offer the sign as it is in its current state, as it is reflective of a small yet positive progression in history, in the viewpoint of at least this proprietor in our society in this time period. What prompted this change of viewpoint, which obviously occurred decades before the Civil Rights Act of 1964, is forever lost to history. The place of origin of this sign is unknown.

The sign is hand-painted on Masonite, a smooth-faced, compressed wood hardboard that was invented in the 1920s and was in popular use during the Depression-ridden 1930s due to its relatively inexpensive price tag. The sign has nine holes to facilitate hanging: three on each end and three down the center of the sign. The sign retains an original surface patina with age-related crackling to the lettering. In addition to the words "White Only" being painted over, a decorative flourish centered between the words "Sleeping Room" and "For Rent" has also been painted over, reason unknown. Mild surface paint loss, scuff-marks, and edge wear are present, commensurate with a 90+year old sign.

An exquisite example of Segregation Era signage that tells a story of prejudice evolving to an acceptance of equality.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #1459667 (stock #BA966)
Stonegate Antiques
$1,195.00
Offered is an extraordinarily rare, 1844, Warren County, Georgia, ARREST WARRANT for a SLAVE girl named Ally who is accused of drowning two young (Caucasian) girls in Sweetwater Creek, Georgia. The girls aged 7 and 10, were daughters of Thomas Roney, who filed the charge. The slave girl, Ally, is owned by Nancy Mayhamry (?SP), but was in the possession of Thomas Roney at the time of the drownings.

The single page, 16" x 25" document was folded in half by its author, and the charge is written out on one side of the folded page (see photos). The folded page was then flipped over, folded into fourths, and the title of the charge was written out: "Warrant of Slave girl Ally Crime of Murder "Tho. Roney (?)Pros(?)".

The text of the charge reads as follows, Paragraph one:
"Georgia Warren County"
"Before me Elisha Burson as Justice of the peace for Said County personally came before me Thomas Roney who being duly Sworn Saith that, he had Just reason to believe and verify doth believed that a negro girl by the name of Ally, hired by, and in the possession of Said Thomas, and the property of Nancy Mayhamry, did on Sunday afternoon twelfth last in Said County in Sweetwater Creek, feloniously and willfully drown two of his children, to wit, two daughters, one ten years old, the other seven years old - Sworn and Subscribed to before me May 30th, 1844" - (signed) Elisha C Burson J.P. (signed) Tho. Roney

Paragraph Two:
"Georgia Warren County"
"To any lawful officer to execute and return - Whereas Thomas Roney hath this day made complaint before me on oath, that he hath just reason to believe and verify doth believed that a negro girl by the name of Ally, hired by, and in the possession of Said Thomas, and the property of Mary Mayhamry, did on Sunday afternoon twelfth last- in Said County in Sweetwater creek, feloniously and willfully drown two of his children, to wit, two daughters one ten years old, the other Seven years old - This was therefore to command you, to apprehend this Said negro girl Ally, and bring her before me that she may be dealt with as the law directs - here of fail not - - - In testimony whereof I have hereunto Set my hand and Seal, May 30th, 1844" - - - (signed) Elisha C Burson J.P. S.S.--(the S.S. encircled perhaps to signify his Seal)

Condition of this very, very unique slavery document is quite fine given its 178 years of age. Expected aging of paper with insignificant and minor tears at creases and tiny areas of soiling. (see photos)

Truly an extraordinarily rare historical document that defines a specific slave-related incident.

One has to wonder what became of Ally? Was she ever caught? If so, she was likely put to death. But was she innocent or guilty? Because she was a slave, it, heinously, did not matter as she would be allowed no voice...

All Items : Antiques : Instruments and Implements : Medical : Pre 1900 item #111759 (stock #M557)
Stonegate Antiques
$1,100.00
This rare and unusual, finely constructed, Civil War Era, portable Field Surgeon's Operating or Gleason type Mortuary Table (also known as a Cooling Table) comes from the estate of a 4th generation New England medical doctor, and retains its original finish with wonderful patina.

The decorative and delicate detailing of this piece is at odds with its most gruesome history! Scalloped copper edge guards and the appealing pattern in which the drainage holes in the laminated wood tabletop were laid out contribute to visual appeal. The softwood table frame stands on nicely turned hardwood legs.

When opened and extended to its maximum dimensions, the table measures 72" long X 18.5" wide X 22" high. To facilitate ease of traveling, this portable table slides and folds to 40" long X 18.5" wide X 4" high. A leather carrying handle is attached to the table edge; legs, when folded, are secured in place with hooks.

Very fine original condition: expected overall wear (patina) with one hook missing and minor unobtrusive loss of laminate along lower table top edge measuring approximately 1/3” wide by 7”.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1910 item #1444733 (stock #B296)
Stonegate Antiques
$995.00
Presented as a historical and cultural artifact, this extraordinarily RARE, very, very scarcely found, cloth book entitled "Pickaninny ABC" was published in London, Patented March 7, 1905, Number 39, by Dean's Rag Book Co. Ltd. The book measures 8.50 inches long x 6.75 inches wide, and is the companion volume to the also exceedingly rare 1904 Dean's Rag Book, "Ten Little Indians" which I have had the pleasure to offer for sale only twice in my decades-long antiques career (see final photo for a cover shot of the companion Ten Little Indians book).

Each of these rag books were published as alphabet and numerical teaching tools for the very young children of the wealthier class who could afford to purchase books to furnish their children's home library as well as to support their early home-tutorial education.

While clearly overtly racist in title (pickaninny) and conceptualization ("A" stands for Alabama Coon, "P" stands for Pickaninnies), the book also promotes age-old stereotypes as well ("W" stands for Watermelon, "U" stands for Uncle Tom, "H" stands for Hen-Roost, "C" stands for Cake Walk, etc) that were, unfortunately, acceptable societal references at the turn of the twentieth century.

This 116 year old book remains in all-original, very good condition with no alterations or repairs. While the front and back covers exhibit significant age-related staining, the interior pages are significantly "cleaner" and the illustrations remain very brightly colored. Interior pages present varying degrees of very light soiling, light foxing, and yellowing of linen, commensurate with age. The exterior binding has teeny spots of wear to the first layer of binding fabric which do not impact binding integrity. Top and bottom edges are subtly frayed.

This book is in truly remarkable condition for its age and in consideration of its all-cloth construction. This title is very RARELY found in today's market and is the first I have ever had the pleasure of offering for sale in my nearly 40 years dealing in this field! This is an absolute cornerstone piece to any serious Black Memorabilia collection!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #1459929 (stock #BA968)
Stonegate Antiques
$975.00
Offered is an extraordinarily rare, 1842, Warren County, Georgia, Apprehension Order for a SLAVE boy named Henry who is accused of committing a violent assault and battery with intent to kill.

The single page, 16" x 25" document was folded in half by its author, and the charge is written out on one side of the folded page and then completed on the back of the same side of the page (see photos). The folded page was then flipped over, folded into fourths, and the title of the charge was written out: "The State VS Henry Negro Boy Slave".

The text of the charge reads as follows, Paragraph one:
"Georgia Warren County"
"Before me Matthew Sheilds a justice of the peace for said county, personally came Stephen Blount who being duly sworn deposeth and sayeth that according to the best of his knowledge and belief Henry a negro boy slave the property of the estate of Hardy Pitts late of said county deceased, did commit a violent assault and battery with intent to kill Deponent, with a heavy stick - and Deponent believes said stick was ferreled (an action suggestive of a wild beast)- upon the person of Deponent - on this night of the thirteenth of this Instant in said county of Warren to wit upon the plantation of Thomas Persons, near Warrenton.
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 14th March 1842."
"Matthew Sheilds JP"
"Stephen Blount"

Paragraph two:
"Georgia Warren County"
"By Matthew Sheilds one of the Justices To Sheriff the Constables of Said County and to all other lawful officers for as much as Stephen Blount who being duly sworn deposeth and sayeth that according to the best of his knowledge and belief Henry a Negro boy Slave the property of the estate of Hardy Pitts late of Said County deceased did commit a violent assault and battery with intent to kill Deponent - with a heavy stick and Deponent believes said stick was ferreled upon the person of Deponent on the night of the thirteenth of this Instant...." (continued next page)

Next Page:
"in Said County of Warren to wit on the plantation of Thomas Persons near Warrenton. These are therefore to Command you that you apprehend the Said Negro Boy Henry and bring him before me or some other Justice of the peace of Said County to Answer the said charge and to be further dealt with according to Law Herein fail not. Given under my hand and Seal this 14th day of March 1842."
"Matthew Sheilds JP" (JP written a second time and encircled in a squiggle to simulate a wax seal)

Condition of this very unique slavery document is quite fine given its 180 years of age. Expected aging of paper with insignificant and minor tears at creases. Also present are three long spillages of ink (as seen in photos) which likely occurred at the time this document was written out with, obviously, no intention of the author to start over again and rewrite!

An extraordinarily rare historical document that defines a specific slave-related incident.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1910 item #430515 (stock #BA536)
Stonegate Antiques
$895.00
Measuring 14 inches high x 8 inches wide, this early and VERY RARE, Circa 1890-1900, exotic Female Blackamoor, metal frame mirror is complete with all original parts including its original 8" x 10" beveled mirror which is in amazing condition!. An extraordinarily difficult to find, highly captivating piece! Unmarked.

This vintage, 120 year old+ piece of Black Americana is in wonderful condition absent two very tiny edge breaks- one at the extreme edge of the right tip of the base, and the other in the very minor loss to the tips of the right thumb and index finger. Neither of these points of extremely insignificant loss are at all readily evident and do little to distract from the truly incredible rarity of this piece.

The frame easily comes apart into 3 pieces for safe shipping and/or storage.

An extraordinary opportunity to acquire an extremely RARE and highly coveted piece of turn-of-the-19th-to-20th-century Black Americana!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1472550 (stock #BA978)
Stonegate Antiques
$850.00
Measuring approximately 7.25 inches high, this magnificent Black Americana Vargas wax figure is mounted on its original wooden platform and is one of a series of fascinating "street character wax dolls" conceived of and crafted by Mrs. Concepcion Vargas Alfonso, daughter of the world-renowned, turn-of-the-20th century, New Orleans, Spanish sculptor, Francisco Vargas.

From approximately 1910 through the 1930's, Mrs. Concepcion Vargas-Alphonso, influenced by the great artistry of her famous father who also sculpted in wax, crafted a variety of wax dolls inspired by the black folk she saw on New Orleans's street corners selling their wares or practicing their trade - black folk performing everyday activities that would have been daily seen on the streets of the city.

Sold exclusively at the time through Harriet's, of 318 Rue Royal in the French Quarter of New Orleans, the completely hand-made, one-of-a-kind dolls are seldom found on today's market due to their inherently fragile nature, making them highly sought after in the Black Memorabilia / Black Americana Collectible arena.

This figure, known as the Female Vegetable Seller Smoking a Pipe, was recently de-accessioned from the Louisiana State University Rural Life Museum collection, Baton Rouge, LA, having been acquired by the museum from a private collector in January 1979.

The Female Vegetable Seller Smoking a Pipe was one of the most popular of the renowned Vargas figures, highly sought after by visitors to the city of New Orleans. Her vegetables were hand-sculpted with exquisite detail and coloring, and her corncob pipe evens presents a red flame in the center of the pipe's bowl, adding to the superlative character authenticity of this Vargas street vendor.

Vargas wax figures are distinctly characterized by their interesting but highly exaggerated facial features. This gentlewoman Vegetable Seller wears a yellow floral kerchief around her neck, a red patterned bandanna on her head, a red, blue, and yellow plaid shirt and skirt, a blue floral-patterned apron around her waist, and black "leather" shoes. Her costume is entirely constructed of actual cloth fabric that was coated with a fine layer of clear wax to stiffen them. The Vegetable Seller's wax body is internally supported by a wire frame through which the figure is securely attached to the wooden base which, underneath, still retains its original "Harriet's" sticker.

This wonderful figure is in incredible condition for her 90+ years of age with, amazingly, only one minor restoration likely performed by the professionals at the LSU Rural Life Museum: a repaired carrot held in her right hand! It is a true rarity that the Vegetable Seller's corncob pipe and all fingers remain present given their highly delicate and fragile nature!

A true must-have piece for the ardent collector of New Orleans Black folk character figures!

Please take a moment to view the additional Vargas figures we currently have the pleasure of offering for sale. Type "Vargas" into the search box on our website homepage.

All Items : Vintage Arts : Decorative Art : Folk Art : Pre 1950 item #1467261 (stock #G707)
Stonegate Antiques
$825.00
Offered is a very difficult to find, hand-carved and hand-painted, ice fishing FISH DECOY from the 1940s era.

This wonderful folk art decoy was recently acquired from the collection of an 81 year old Kansas collector who stated that the decoy originated in Montana.

Expertly carved and painted to simulate an actual Perch fish, this beauty quite closely reflects the real thing!

In fact, this charmer has some subtle signs of having once been an actual working decoy as evidenced by the light areas of superficial rust on the tin fins and at the junction where the fishing line connects to the eyelet in front of the dorsal fin. Clearly, given this decoy's incredible condition and its 80+ age, it did not see much use below the waterline!

There is faint loss of paint and light wear giving this a work of art a wonderful vintage patina. Two weights are present on the underside of Mr. Perch. Measures 9 inches long x 3 inches wide x 2.5 inches high including the fins. Maker unknown.

An utterly splendid work of folk art!

Please take a moment to view our other fish decoys offered for sale by typing "decoy" into our homepage SEARCH box or by clicking on the "American Folk Art" specialty category on our homepage.

All Items : Vintage Arts : Instruments and Implements : Medical : Apothecary : Pre 1930 item #1465986 (stock #M1431)
Stonegate Antiques
$800.00
Offered is a simply outstanding, extraordinarily scarce, 1920-1930s Art Deco era, ceiling-mount-hanging, drugstore show globe in impeccable condition!

The fancy and highly-stylized, Art Deco, aluminum frame cradles an equally highly-stylized, classically-ribbed, clear glass show globe and finial. If so desired, the show globe will hold colored-water as was the display fashion back "in-the-day". The frame is embellished with a buffed, silver matte finish with design details outlined in contrasting black to further enhance the fabulous, Art Deco styling. The chain link is also painted black, echoing the black detailing of the frame, and it retains most of its gorgeous, original finish, with absolutely no pitting! The hanger medallions retain their original finish and are ready for mounting. Here and there, the metal parts retain a faint honey tone adding to the show globe's antique charm. This fabulous apothecary showpiece measures approximately 34.5 inches from the top of its fancy, ceiling-mount hanger to the base. If desired, it is possible to add additional chain links to further extend the overall length of the globe.

The condition is excellent. The globe glass is clean and clear except for some very, very faint haze on the interior top of the globe just below the neck. A perfectly fitting, ground-glass faceted finial echoing Art Deco design, rounds out this beauty.

The combined take-away of this offering, this outstanding piece of nearly 100 year old, American pharmacy history, is its exquisite Art Deco styling with extraordinary visual appeal, its utterly excellent condition, and its very scarce, ceiling-mount design, making it a true rarity among extant Apothecary antiques and collectibles!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1068531 (stock #BA798)
Stonegate Antiques
$795.00
Protected in a 15.25 x 24.75 inch, black hard plastic frame with glass and coordinating mat, this authentic GOLD DUST Trolley Sign was manufactured by the N.K. Fairbanks Company in 1920’s!

GOLD DUST Trolley Signs are a very rare find in today’s market as they were made of cardboard, a material much less likely to withstand the test of time as opposed to tin advertising signs which were much sturdier!

This Gold Dust trolley sign features the Gold Dust Twins dressed in ruffled, red skirts emblazoned with the words “GOLD DUST”, busily scrubbing the front porch and the kitchen in a vigorous attempt at “Spring Cleaning”. The colors featured in this trolley sign are just stunning—greens, pale peachy-colored orange, pale blue, and yellows with white apple blossoms and red tulips flowering in profusion!! To the left of the Gold Dust Twin scrubbing the front porch, sits a large box of Gold Dust Washing Powder. The advertisement proclaims in black-outlined, peachy-orange lettering: “For Spring House Cleaning”.

The condition of this trolley sign is truly quite fine. Colors are very strong and consistent throughout; please ignore the various glass reflections seen in some of the photos- they were unavoidable and do appear to make the colors appear a bit faded—which is inaccurate! The sign is free of rips or tears although it does have two, early, fold-creases – one running from top to bottom of the sign along the left side of the pail and between the “O” and “L” in “GOLD” and the other vertical crease on the very right edge of the sign, running through the stove in the kitchen to the “T” in “DUST”. The creases are very unobtrusive and do not detract from the wonderful, colorful imagery this sign conveys.

An unusual opportunity to acquire a very RARE piece of Black Americana!!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #1209250 (stock #BA859)
Stonegate Antiques
$795.00
De-accessioned from the inventory of the ill-fated Middle Passage Museum (see museum history below), this very unusual and atypical, 19th century, estate document is offered for sale, the purpose of which was to itemize and execute a division of property from the estate of the deceased, southern plantation owner. This document was purchased in the 1960s by one of the founders of the Middle Passage Museum from a descendant of this Sumter County, Georgia, plantation owner.

This is single page, partial document written on both front and back sides. It is missing its first page which would have shown the name of the deceased slave owner and the listing of the interior household goods and furnishings, and the last page which would have noted the date and county in which the document was executed as well as witness and judicial signatures. However, the most historically significant page exists and is offered here- a plantation estate document in which the slaves are referenced by name and further described by their family position and marital status!

What makes this document EXTRAORDINARILY RARE, UNUSUAL, and ATYPICAL is that it proceeds to, first, categorize the 40 slaves using the word SLAVES instead of the common verbiage of the time -Negroes-, and secondly, it proceeds to list the male slaves BY NAME, ALONG WITH THE NAMES OF THEIR WIVES AND THEIR CHILDREN, with monetary value listed in the right column of the document!!!! In two instances, the number of years married is also listed! Children are labeled "Girl, "Boy", or "Infant". Total value of these 40 slaves was calculated at $24,200.00!

Given that slaves were viewed as property and not human beings in any way equal to the Caucasian race which enslaved them, it is extraordinarily unusual to find a document which recognizes and lists slaves as "Family Units", further designating family position- husband, wife or child! Typically,there was little, if any, thought given to the pain and anguish such slave families would suffer if their "owner" chose to sell off any one of them at any given time. Such estate documents as this listing ENTIRE SLAVE FAMILIES BY NAME is simply without precedent! It would indeed be a phenomenal discovery to be able to identify the plantation and/or deceased slave owner as such an estate listing speaks to an uncommon, albeit, rare and unique perspective of slave ownership. Such a personalized and humanized account of the slaves owned makes this particular document all the more heart-wrenching, and it certainly begs the very sad question of whether or not these slave families were allowed to remain united and intact once the final estate disposition was conducted.

The document measures approximately 8 1/2 inches wide x 14 1/8 inches long, is double-sided and is in good condition, with fold lines evident along with some age-related foxing at top and bottom fold lines. 1 3/4 tear along the fold line of the top fold at right edge. The ink color is sepia toned (likely as a result of some fading over time) on a pale blue, vertically-ruled, heavy paper. This phenomenal piece of cultural ephemera is ready for appropriate archival preservation/framing.

The listing of slaves is on the back side of the document with the front side listing farm animals, equipment and supplies along with values- "The following property set apart for the use and benefit of the farm".

Middle Passage Museum History: The Middle Passage Museum was the dream of Jim and Mary Anne Petty of Mississippi as well as that of an anonymous Georgian benefactor who had together compiled a collection of slave artifacts numbering over 15,000 pieces and who had hoped to find a permanent site in Mobile, Alabama, for their museum. While they formed a non-profit organization to raise funds for their hoped-for museum, their dream was never realized.

In a 2003 statement, Jim Petty remarked, "The importance of the exhibit of these artifacts is to understand the harshness of what slavery and segregation was all about. The items in the exhibit remind us of the terrible heinousness of slavery. Viewing the collection can be very emotional, but it is a tool through which we can understand, honor and respect a great culture. We want to realize that out of slavery, a great culture emerged, and carried on, and continued to strive for a better life regardless of the adverse conditions that were placed upon them."

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1472487 (stock #BA975)
Stonegate Antiques
$795.00
Measuring approximately 7 inches high, this highly sought after Black Americana Vargas wax figure is mounted on its original wooden platform and is one of a series of fascinating "street character wax dolls" conceived of and crafted by Mrs. Concepcion Vargas Alfonso, daughter of the world-renowned, turn-of-the-20th century, New Orleans, Spanish sculptor, Francisco Vargas.

From approximately 1910 through the 1930's, Mrs. Concepcion Vargas-Alphonso, influenced by the great artistry of her father who also famously sculpted in wax, crafted a variety of wax dolls inspired by the black folk she saw on New Orleans's street corners selling their wares or practicing their trade - black folk performing everyday activities that would have been daily seen on the streets of the city.

Sold exclusively at the time through Harriet's, of 318 Rue Royal in the French Quarter of New Orleans, the completely hand-made, one-of-a-kind dolls are seldom found on today's market due to their inherently fragile nature, making them highly sought after in the Black Memorabilia / Black Americana Collectible arena.

This figure, known as the Praline Seller, was recently de-accessioned from the Louisiana State University Rural Life Museum collection, Baton Rouge, LA, having been acquired by the museum from a private collector in January 1979.

The Praline Seller was one of the most popular of the renowned Vargas figures, highly sought after by visitors to the city of New Orleans. She holds a wicker basket in her right arm that contains five incredibly realistic praline cakes, and tucked under her left arm is a paper "fan" used to ward off any flies from landing upon her delicious pralines.

Vargas wax figures are distinctly characterized by their interesting but highly exaggerated facial features. This gentlewoman Praline Seller wears a yellow floral kerchief around her neck, a red, yellow and blue bandanna on her head, a red and yellow plaid shirt, an ecru linen waist apron, and a delightful yellow skirt patterned all over with whimsical bunny rabbits, which nearly conceals her black "leather" shoes. Her costume is entirely constructed of actual cloth fabric that was coated with a fine layer of clear wax to stiffen them.

The Praline Seller's wax body is internally supported by a wire frame through which the figure is securely attached to the wooden base. The bottom of the base has the word "Praline" scripted on it.

This wonderful figure is in amazing condition for her 90+ years of age with one imperfection: a missing thumb on her left hand- a common condition occurring due to the extreme delicacy and fragility of the wax. At very close inspection, it appears that her right forearm may have been professionally repaired some many years ago, likely by professional staff at the museum.

A true must-have piece for the ardent collector of New Orleans Black folk character figures!

Please take a moment to view the additional Vargas figures we currently have the pleasure of offering for sale. Type "Vargas" into the search box on our website homepage.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1472505 (stock #BA976)
Stonegate Antiques
$795.00
Measuring approximately 7 inches high, this highly sought after Black Americana Vargas wax figure is mounted on its original wooden platform and is one of a series of fascinating "street character wax dolls" conceived of and crafted by Mrs. Concepcion Vargas Alfonso, daughter of the world-renowned, turn-of-the-20th century, New Orleans, Spanish sculptor, Francisco Vargas.

From approximately 1910 through the 1930's, Mrs. Concepcion Vargas-Alphonso, influenced by the great artistry of her father who also famously sculpted in wax, crafted a variety of wax dolls inspired by the black folk she saw on New Orleans's street corners selling their wares or practicing their trade - black folk performing everyday activities that would have been daily seen on the streets of the city.

Sold exclusively at the time through Harriet's, of 318 Rue Royal in the French Quarter of New Orleans, the completely hand-made, one-of-a-kind dolls are seldom found on today's market due to their inherently fragile nature, making them highly sought after in the Black Memorabilia / Black Americana Collectible arena.

This figure, known as the Cotton Seller, was recently de-accessioned from the Louisiana State University Rural Life Museum collection, Baton Rouge, LA, having been acquired by the museum from a private collector in January 1979.

This female Cotton Seller is a bit unusual as she has a simple, red-patterned cloth draped over her head, neck, and shoulders to protect from the sun, instead of the more typically-found bandanna worn by the majority of female street vendors. She holds a wax "wicker" basket in her right arm that is brimming with freshly-picked cotton, and at her feet, her left hand balances a large burlap bag containing much, much more cotton.

Vargas wax figures are distinctly characterized by their interesting but highly exaggerated facial features. This gentlewoman Cotton Seller wears a red floral kerchief around her neck, a green patterned shirt, and a delightful yellow skirt patterned all over with clusters of hearts, which nearly conceals her black "leather" shoes. Her costume is entirely constructed of actual cloth fabric that was coated with a fine layer of clear wax to stiffen them. The Cotton Seller's wax body is internally supported by a wire frame through which the figure is securely attached to the wooden base.

This wonderful figure is in absolutely amazing condition for her 90+ years of age with only one imperfection: a missing index finger on her left hand- a common condition occurring due to the extreme delicacy and fragility of the wax.

Please take a moment to view the additional Vargas figures we currently have the pleasure of offering for sale. Type "Vargas" into the search box on our website homepage.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1472509 (stock #BA977)
Stonegate Antiques
$795.00
Measuring approximately 7.25 inches high, this very highly sought after Black Americana Vargas wax figure is mounted on its original wooden platform and is one of a series of fascinating "street character wax dolls" conceived of and crafted by Mrs. Concepcion Vargas Alfonso, daughter of the world-renowned, turn-of-the-20th century, New Orleans, Spanish sculptor, Francisco Vargas.

From approximately 1910 through the 1930's, Mrs. Concepcion Vargas-Alphonso, influenced by the great artistry of her famous father who also sculpted in wax, crafted a variety of wax dolls inspired by the black folk she saw on New Orleans's street corners selling their wares or practicing their trade - black folk performing everyday activities that would have been daily seen on the streets of the city.

Sold exclusively at the time through Harriet's, of 318 Rue Royal in the French Quarter of New Orleans, the completely hand-made, one-of-a-kind dolls are seldom found on today's market due to their inherently fragile nature, making them highly sought after in the Black Memorabilia / Black Americana Collectible arena.

This figure, known as the Spanish Moss Seller with Alligator, was recently de-accessioned from the Louisiana State University Rural Life Museum collection, Baton Rouge, LA, having been acquired by the museum from a private collector in January 1979.

The Spanish Moss Seller with Alligator was one of the most popular of the renowned Vargas figures, highly sought after by visitors to the city of New Orleans. On his back he balances a very large bale of Spanish moss, while holding tight to a rope that is connected to a very young alligator perched at his feet.

Vargas wax figures are distinctly characterized by their interesting but highly exaggerated facial features. This gentleman Spanish Moss Seller with Alligator wears a red floral kerchief around his neck, a yellow straw hat on his head, a green flowered shirt, tan striped pants, and black "leather" shoes. His costume is entirely constructed of actual cloth fabric that was coated with a fine layer of clear wax to stiffen them. The Spanish Moss Seller's wax body is internally supported by a wire frame through which the figure is securely attached to the wooden base.

This wonderful figure is in amazing condition for his 90+ years of age with three minor restorations likely performed by the professionals at the LSU Rural Life Museum: a repaired right hand, and two re-attached feet on the alligator.

A true must-have piece for the ardent collector of New Orleans Black folk character figures!

Please take a moment to view the additional Vargas figures we currently have the pleasure of offering for sale. Type "Vargas" into the search box on our website homepage.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1472552 (stock #BA979)
Stonegate Antiques
$795.00
Measuring approximately 7 inches high, this wonderful Black Americana Vargas wax figure is mounted on its original wooden platform and is one of a series of fascinating "street character wax dolls" conceived of and crafted by Mrs. Concepcion Vargas Alfonso, daughter of the world-renowned, turn-of-the-20th century, New Orleans, Spanish sculptor, Francisco Vargas.

From approximately 1910 through the 1930's, Mrs. Concepcion Vargas-Alphonso, influenced by the great artistry of her famous father who also sculpted in wax, crafted a variety of wax dolls inspired by the black folk she saw on New Orleans's street corners selling their wares or practicing their trade - black folk performing everyday activities that would have been daily seen on the streets of the city.

Sold exclusively at the time through Harriet's, of 318 Rue Royal in the French Quarter of New Orleans, the completely hand-made, one-of-a-kind dolls are seldom found on today's market due to their inherently fragile nature, making them highly sought after in the Black Memorabilia / Black Americana Collectible arena.

This figure, known as the Banana Seller, was recently de-accessioned from the Louisiana State University Rural Life Museum collection, Baton Rouge, LA, having been acquired by the museum from a private collector in January 1979.

The Banana Seller was one of the more difficult to find of the Vargas figures. In his right hand he holds a very large cluster of bananas that are all still attached to a tree branch, and in his left hand he holds a silver-colored, light-weight, cardboard-constructed machete. A single banana rests at his feet having fallen off the cluster.

Vargas wax figures are distinctly characterized by their interesting but highly exaggerated facial features. This gentleman Banana Seller wears a red floral kerchief around his neck, a green flowered shirt, black and tan herringbone-patterned pants, and black "leather" shoes. His costume is entirely constructed of actual cloth fabric that was coated with a fine layer of clear wax to stiffen them. The Banana Seller's wax body is internally supported by a wire frame through which the figure is securely attached to the wooden base. Underneath the wood base is stamped the following: "Genuine VARGAS New Orleans LA".

Quite interestingly, the Banana Seller is without a hat. He wears his hair very predominantly parted on one side suggesting that his carefully styled hair was meant to be displayed, and that this particular figure was never created wearing a hat.

This wonderful figure is in amazing condition for his 90+ years of age with one minor restoration likely performed by the professionals at the LSU Rural Life Museum: a repaired right hand. He appears to have lost a little bit of his hair in the back (see photo).

A true must-have piece for the ardent collector of New Orleans Black folk character figures!

Please take a moment to view the additional Vargas figures we currently have the pleasure of offering for sale. Type "Vargas" into the search box on our website homepage.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1472553 (stock #BA981)
Stonegate Antiques
$795.00
Measuring approximately 7.25 inches high, this difficult to find, Black Americana Vargas wax figure is mounted on its original wooden platform and is one of a series of fascinating "street character wax dolls" conceived of and crafted by Mrs. Concepcion Vargas Alfonso, daughter of the world-renowned, turn-of-the-20th century, New Orleans, Spanish sculptor, Francisco Vargas.

From approximately 1910 through the 1930's, Mrs. Concepcion Vargas-Alphonso, influenced by the great artistry of her famous father who also sculpted in wax, crafted a variety of wax dolls inspired by the black folk she saw on New Orleans's street corners selling their wares or practicing their trade - black folk performing everyday activities that would have been daily seen on the streets of the city.

While the majority of Vargas figures were sold exclusively through Harriet's, of 318 Rue Royal in the French Quarter of New Orleans, a small number of Vargas figures were also sold through Kate Latter's Candy Shop in New Orleans. The shop, opening during the Great Depression years, had significant financial difficulties and closed after only five years (1933-1938) in business. This particular Vargas figure was one that was sold there, and it retains a gold foil sticker advertising the shop underneath its wood base.

Vargas figures are completely hand-made, one-of-a-kind dolls that are seldom found on today's market due to their inherently fragile nature, making them highly sought after in the Black Memorabilia / Black Americana Collectible arena.

This figure, known as the Sugar Cane Seller, was recently de-accessioned from the Louisiana State University Rural Life Museum collection, Baton Rouge, LA, having been acquired by the museum from a private collector in January 1979.

The Sugar Cane Seller is one of the more difficult to find of the Vargas figures. In his right hand he holds three stalks of newly cut sugar cane, and in his left hand he holds a silver-colored, light-weight, metal machete.

Vargas wax figures are distinctly characterized by their interesting but highly exaggerated facial features. This gentleman Sugar Cane Seller wears a red and yellow checked kerchief around his neck, a green shirt with yellow polka dots, black and tan striped pants, and black "leather" shoes. His costume is entirely constructed of actual cloth fabric that was coated with a fine layer of clear wax to stiffen them. The Sugar Cane Seller's wax body is internally supported by a wire frame through which the figure is securely attached to the wooden base. Underneath the wood base is found the Kate Latter's Candy Store sticker as well as an inventory sticker from the LSU Rural Life Museum.

This wonderful figure is in fine condition for his 90+ years of age with the following minor restorations likely performed by the professionals at the LSU Rural Life Museum: a restored right hand (that is presently missing a thumb), and restoration to the back of the vendor's hat, noted by the lighter colored wax. The sugar cane stalks appear to have been reattached in place, and his left hand is also missing the thumb. Due to the fragility of the wax fingers, it is not uncommon to find them missing or partially present.

The Sugar Cane Seller's light-weight metal machete was once attached to the left hand. It is my opinion that this metal machete was fashioned by professionals at the museum to replace the original cardboard version. Its weight, however, appears to be too much for the wax hand to hold, and thus, it became unattached while still in the museum's collection. As seen in the photos, the machete can be successfully rested inside the hand provided it is placed so that it is balanced, with equal lengths of the machete in front of and behind the hand.

A true must-have, rarely-found piece for the ardent collector of New Orleans Black folk character figures!

Please take a moment to view the additional Vargas figures we currently have the pleasure of offering for sale. Type "Vargas" into the search box on our website homepage.