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All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #326364 (stock #BA313)
Stonegate Antiques
$375.00
In the mid-1800's, an unknown artist painted the face of a young Black boy in warm, soft colors, and unbeknown to the artist, forever immortalized the young boy's image! Since that time a variety of items were been produced in the image of the "Young Black boy with the Torn Hat" or "Johnny Griffin".

This circa 1920-30's Johnny Griffin item is constructed in solid brass and is known as a document clip used to hold together important papers. It remains functional for such use today or may be simply used as an attractive desk paperweight!

It is in all original condition with delightful patina- not a reproduction- no replaced parts- and measures 4 1/8 inches long x 2 3/8 inches wide. It does not retain any marking other than a mold number 5241.

Johnny Griffin Black Americana collectibles should form the cornerstone of any serious Black Memorabilia collection!

To see all of the Johnny Griffin items currently available for sale, simply type “Johnny Griffin” into the search box on our web home page.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1480299 (stock #BA952)
Stonegate Antiques
$295.00
Measuring 9 inches high, these delightful examples of Folk Art styling represent three of a series of Black cloth character dolls made in Alabama in the 1930’s by unknown craftsmen/women employed under President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's (FDR) Depression era program, the Work Projects Administration (WPA), in existence from 1935-1943.

The Work Projects Administration was designed to provide jobs across the country during the Great Depression when hundreds of thousands were out of work. While most WPA jobs were in construction and infrastructure, the most well-known project arm of the WPA, known as Federal Project Number One, employed musicians, artists, writers, actors and directors in arts, drama, media, and literacy projects. The five projects assigned to this consortium were: the Federal Writers’ Project (FWP), the Historical Records Survey (HRS), the Federal Theatre Project (FTP), the Federal Music Project (FMP), and the Federal Art Project (FAP).

The creation of these fabulous dolls fell under the WPA Federal Art Project, with the goal of representing and preserving the various aspects of the culture, work and lives of the Southern black community of this time period. All of the WPA black folk dolls produced for this project were placed on asphalt shingle stands, they all feature elderly folk, they all share black leather shoes, a cotton-batting stuffed body, and identical hand-stitched facial features with subtle and unique variations in expression around the eyes due to the clever positioning of the eyebrows!

The Country Preacher is fully decked out to conduct worship services, from his black, wide-brimmed top hat down to his leather shoes, the left one, unfortunately, showing a bit of wear with his socked big toe peeking out! His machine-stitched clothing is all in the color black with the exception of his white ministerial collar. The preacher holds his real-wood walking stick securely in his right hand while clutching the Holy Bible under his left arm. Note the colorful red handkerchief that was placed in a back pants pocket, peeking out between the tails of his suit coat. The fully bearded preacher wears silver, wire-rimmed spectacles surrounding his soft and compassionate eyes and offers an open smile showing his front two teeth!

The white haired, bearded male country gentleman doll is attired in machine-sewn cotton, blue-striped britches with a patch at the left knee, black suspenders and a tan striped cotton shirt with a red kerchief tied around his neck. His hat is constructed of cranberry-colored felt. Under his right arm, he holds a nicely crafted fabric chicken that has sustained a tiny bit of fabric loss to its face, while his left arm holds a wooden walking stick. His complete asphalt shingle is missing, but remnants remain firmly attached on the soles of his shoes. He bears a very sweet, surprised expression on his face as evidenced by his slightly upturned eyebrows!

The female doll in this grouping is clad in a red and white checkered, machine-stitched dress topped over with a cream-colored linen apron which evidences, here and there, some very light, age-related discoloration. Her apron pocket displays a red and white polka-dotted hankie- a lovely detail-, while a bright, multi-colored head wrap protectively covers her graying hair from dust and grime while she completes household chores. Her outfit is fully completed with the cream-colored linen chemise and pantaloons underneath her dress, and she wears black leather shoes. Even though she is working at chores, as evidenced by the wicker-straw broom she holds in her right hand, she has not forgotten to wear her brass-toned, double hoop earrings! And she wears a pleasant expression on her hand-stitched face, showing a bit of a smile and her two front teeth.

Three very special dolls, which today, are becoming very, very difficult to find, representing a snapshot of history, capturing the lives of poor southern black folk of the Depression era! The Preacher and Lady with the Broom are priced at $295.00 each, with the Country Gent Holding a Chicken priced at $275.00 to compensate for his incomplete asphalt shingle.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #1113134 (stock #BA804)
Stonegate Antiques
$325.00
Offered is a bucolic and beautifully-colored, medium-folio, copyrighted 1854, Nathaniel Currier, New York, lithograph entitled, "Catching A Trout". The image measures approximately 10" x 14", and depicts a fancily-dressed African-American man "netting" the trout caught by one of the two well-dressed gentleman enjoying a relaxing day of fishing. This Currier + Ives lithograph is infrequently found, and is quite highly collectible.

Condition of the litho is considered very good given the rich coloration that remains. Some minor wear does exist: 2 small tears measuring less than 1/2 inch each on either side border edge-- one in the trees on the right side and the other on the left side in the water. There are several teeny holes in the sky to the right of the bearded gentleman's fishing pole as well as one single hole in the black gentleman's hair. (Please see photos.) Some wear to the border at top as shown in photos.

Despite the noted imperfections, this lithograph displays beautifully, with rich color and crisp lines. It presently resides in an early 1920's frame; ideally from a conservation point of view, it would benefit from a re-framing with acid-free materials to continue to preserve its historic importance.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #853330 (stock #B297)
Stonegate Antiques
$165.00
A wonderful and extremely RARE, 1st Edition, hard cover book by Carolyn Sherwin Bailey, copyrighted 1938 by Platt and Munk Publishers and measuring 6.50 x 8.25 inches. Platt and Munk Publishers, like McLoughlin Publishers, were widely known to employ the most talented illustrators of the time period. Platt and Munk books are highly sought after for this reason.

Fabulous colored and black and white illustrations (see photos) adorn this 26 page book! The book features the adventures of a little Southern boy who lives with his gran'mammy and gran'daddy in a log cabin set down in a cotton field.

Interior pages are in very nice, near mint condition, are clean and bright and are tightly bound together. The only intrusion is a former owner's name, "Weaver", written in blue ink on the interior cover page (see photo). The hard bound cloth covers are in fine condition, with very, very slight wear to cover spine edges and book corners typical of a book of its age. This is a verified first edition as later editions had the cloth board without the color pastedown. Illustrated on every page, alternating color and black and white. This copy includes a worn, tattered, but nearly complete dust cover, which accounts for the pristine condition of the front and back hardcovers.

A very charming addition to one's Black Americana collection, and a black-themed children's book that is very rarely found in today's collectible market!!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #924045 (stock #BA760)
Stonegate Antiques
$295.00
Measuring 33 inches long x 15 inches high, this vintage 1869, black ink, original lithograph was published as an art supplement to Appleton's Journal.

The litho was executed by John Karst with his signature appearing in the lower left hand corner. Highly detailed, the litho reproduces a bustling New Orleans' dock scene featuring numerous slaves at work.

This litho was professionally re-framed using museum-quality, acid-free materials in 2004. The frame is a classic styled, black painted, beaded, hardwood accented with a dark rose, acid-free mat.

A fascinating glimpse into life on the docks of the Mississippi River at New Orleans!

Please note that any white spots or streaking appearing in photos are the result of light reflection and are not damage to the litho.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #560341 (stock #BA612)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
This vintage 1920's cast iron figure is an authentic piece that was carefully hand-painted long ago. The interesting little hooded drummer measures just 1.5 inches high and is in fine condition with paint scrapes here and there (see all photos). Great facial detail! An interesting figure that displays exceedingly well! Please see the other African-American cast iron figures available for purchase!
All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #264039 (stock #BA13)
Stonegate Antiques
$325.00
A very RARE and highly appealing Black Memorabilia Advertising Die cut!

Marked "Copyright 1924", in the lower left hand corner, this extremely hard-to-find advertising piece measures 10.5 inches wide x 13.5 inches high. Colorful and visually interesting, the heavy cardboard die cut depicts an engaging Uncle Wabash serenely strumming his banjo on his front porch! Guess the message to the consumer was, "Eat one of Uncle Wabash's cupcakes to experience your own little slice of heaven and serenity!"

Condition of this charming piece of Black Historical ephemera is quite good given its nearly 100+ years of age!! Old water staining to bottom of the die cut does little to detract from the piece. Crease line to one cupcake edge. Appropriate age-related foxing to back.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1478731 (stock #BA807)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Measuring just 2.25 inches in height (minus the hair!!), this extremely RARE, clear glass Golliwogg Perfume Bottle was sold by VIGNY Perfumeries of Paris, France in the 1920’s.

The clear glass perfume was the second version of the Vigny “Le Golliwogg” perfume produced from the 1920’s into the 1930’s. The bottle design and name are based on a character created by Englishwoman, Florence K. Upton, around the turn of the 20th century. The bottle, itself, was made by Verreries Brosse.

This darling, all-glass piece remains in superb condition-other than its partially missing label on the base of the bottle. If complete, this wonderful, original paper label would read in full, “Made in France, Fluid Cont oz 13”. Underneath the label, the base of the clear glass bottle is impressed, “Bottle Made in France”. Most importantly of all, the bottle retains its fabulous, all-original, front label which reads, "Le Golliwogg de Vigny France".

The Golliwogg’s head is the perfume stopper (which presently is quite securely affixed in place), and the facial enameling, which was hand-painted in France, remains as clear and crisp as the day it was applied! Even his black furry hair, which is genuine Siberian Seal fur, retains its vibrant, original, dark tones! The Golly’s glass collar is enameled/painted white with double rows of black polka dots, and his feet are accented in black.

A very, very special, rarely-found piece of Black Memorabilia that has appeal to Black Americana, perfume bottle, and Golliwog collectors alike!

Type "Vigny" in the SEARCH box on our homepage to see all French Golliwogg Perfume bottles!

To see all of our Golliwogg-related items for sale, type "golliwogg" into the SEARCH box on our home page.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1482512 (stock #BA995)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Measuring just 2.5" tall and wide, this diminutive, metal, Black Face, Googly Eye toy or game is all original and completely functional despite its near 100 years of age!

Pull the original string attached at the base, and Mr. Googly's eyes move into all sorts of silly positions! Three photos are included to demonstrate the variety of eye positions possible.

The paint is in wonderful condition with just the tiniest, pinprick size dots of loss noted here and there, and only well-seen under magnification. A small crease under the nose is present with no impact to the toy's integrity. This toy was also designed to be wearable, and on the backside one of the two original clothing pins remain.

The toy is marked "Made in Germany" on the reverse side. Two photos were taken in an attempt to clarify this marking, although the beginning and the end of the word "Germany" have worn away over time, making the task difficult!

A seldom found vintage toy in functional, all-original condition! Displays nicely!

Enter "Googly" into the SEARCH box to see our other Googly-Eye collectibles!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1837 VR item #1469991 (stock #BA974)
Stonegate Antiques
$1,995.00
These authentic and extraordinarily RARE, hand-forged, wrought iron, Slave Ship Ankle Shackles were de-accessioned from a private collection. Ankle shackles such as these were used to restrain and imprison kidnapped Africans below decks in the slaver ships' holds during what is known as the ‘Middle Passage’, the brutal voyage endured by captured Africans from the West Coast of Africa to enslavement in the Americas- the second portion of what was known as the transatlantic slave trade.

While the precise age of this late 18th to early 19th century old shackle is unknown, this type of ankle shackle has been documented to have been in use as far back as the 1780's by English slave traders, and was likely in continued use up until the 1860 onset of America's Civil War.

In 2015, the International Slavery Museum in Liverpool, England, acquired a set of ankle shackles very similar to the set offered here. In referring to the museum's acquisition, the museum's Head, Dr Richard Benjamin, related the following:

“A similar pair of shackles was purchased in Liverpool by the campaigner Thomas Clarkson in his antislavery crusade as evidence against the transatlantic slave trade. They were presented in front of Privy Council in 1788 as part of its enquiry into the transatlantic slave trade. An engraving of the shackles with a detailed description also appeared in Clarkson’s antislavery pamphlet."

These hand-forged, wrought iron ankle shackles remain in all-original and untouched condition, measuring approximately 11.75 inches in length. The cuff sizes vary slightly ranging from approximate lengths of 3.75 to 4 inches and approximate widths from 2.75 to 3 inches, a set likely used on a female slave. The shackles can be described as consisting of a wrought iron bolt with a pair of loops slid onto it via holes in both ends of each loop. One end of the iron bar is fixed closed by a triangular-shaped flange large enough to prevent the loops from being removed from the bar. The other end of the bar ends in a circular "eye" that is secured closed by a hand-wrought circular "lock washer" inserted at the time the shackles were applied.

An utterly gruesome, tangible testament to the malevolence and horrors of slavery and the transatlantic slave trade.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #192629 (stock #BA353B)
Stonegate Antiques
$65.00
Measuring approximately 23 inches high X 18 inches wide, this heavy cardboard restaurant menu from the 1940’s has never been used! This menu board was designed by the manufacturer to be a consumable, throw-away --- for jotting down the ever-changing, daily menu “Specials”!

Featuring a delightful, cartoon-like caricature of a black man, this board is in very good condition with minor edge wear, slight age-discoloration and a teeny missing piece of the front rim of the hat.

An interesting, seldom-found piece of Black Memorabilia!

Please disregard reflections in photos that are due to the presence of protective plastic wrap.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1371023 (stock #BA936)
Stonegate Antiques
$195.00
Measuring 15.5 inches long, this delightful, folk-art styled, cloth and stocking-constructed rag doll was made circa 1920's.

Detailing in construction sets this sweet black doll apart! Her creation was very carefully executed through a combination of hand and machine stitching. She was lovingly dressed in machine-stitched clothing made from old red, pink, cream and rose-patterned scraps of cloth, while her body was hand-sewn and constructed of old, black stockings stuffed with cotton batting.

This young girl's nose and mouth are hand-embroidered, while her eyes are represented by small, black buttons. Her hand-applied and stitched hair is made of black wool yarn and has been fashioned into braided pigtails edged with faded red ribbon bows with fluffy bangs topping her forehead. Her hands are carefully hand-stitched to delineate fingers.

This sweetie is in near perfect condition with the exception of some fading to her clothing as well as two age-related, small holes to her stocking-constructed left foot and lower leg. (This wear and fading to the fabrics and stockings used in her construction may well be the very reason they were used, as they may have been discarded from personal use. Please refer to photos to view wear.)

Purchased in Charleston, South Carolina. Simply full of charm with lovely touches! A quite difficult-to-find-in-this condition, 90+-year-old, cloth rag doll!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #1482911 (stock #B317)
Stonegate Antiques
$145.00
This very rare, 1894, historically significant work of factually-based fiction by Marietta Holley, recounts the author's perspective of what life in the post-Confederate South was like, detailing the significant adjustment Southerners experienced once the Civil War ended and slavery was wholly abolished.

This nearly-lost historical work was originally published in 1892 exclusively for the subscription market and was entitled, "Samantha on the Race Problem". Two years later when the work was to be sold on the "popular" market, the publishers, Dodd, Mead and Company, New York, deemed it appropriate to re-title the work, "Samantha Among the Colored Folk", including the subtitle, "My ideas on the Race Problem" on the title page only. Interestingly, this re-titled, 1894, popular market edition still retains the title, "Samantha on the Race Problem" at the top of each of its 387 pages! This is truly a fascinating read, particularly for those who have a keen interest in this tumultuous period of American history.

The author, Marietta Holley of New York, born in 1836, was an American humorist who employed satire to comment on American society and politics. Early in her career, she published not as Marietta Holley, but as "Josiah Allen's Wife", sometimes with her own name also added in parentheses beneath his, as is the case in this particular edition. Interestingly, Marietta was never married, and Josiah Allen never existed. She eventually published under her own name enjoying a prolific writing career and becoming a bestselling author by the turn of the 20th century, although, sadly, she was largely forgotten by the time of her death in 1926.

Illustrated by Edward Windsor Kemble, this work contains over eighty of his pen and ink drawings. Each drawing is titled and a listing of all illustrations can be found at the beginning of the book. Kemble, who enjoyed a prolific career as a political cartoonist for a variety of the top US newspapers and periodicals, was well-known for his caricatures of African Americans, and he illustrated for some of the most famous American writers of the day such as Mark Twain (The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn), Harriet Beecher Stowe (Uncle Tom's Cabin") and Washington Irving (Knickerbocker History of New York).

Written in dialect, this nearly 130 year old book bears evidence of its many, many years. The cloth-bound hardcover is very well-worn along all edges with the cloth spine showing the worst of the wear: small tears at top and bottom with some very small areas of missing fabric. The binding is separating from the spine, but all 387 pages still remain bound and attached (some pages just barely - see photos) with the exception of page 109/110 (see photo) which is present, but for some reason, was cut with scissors from the book. A good number of pages have some degree of staining (see photos), there is foxing throughout, and a very teeny tear here and there. An inked ownership inscription exists on the inside front cover.

Having described its significantly aged condition, it must again be emphasized that this 1894, 2nd edition, is EXTREMELY rare, seldom found available for purchase on the retail marketplace.

"Samantha Among Colored Folks - My Ideas On The Race Problem" is a must-read for those interested in the author's perspective of the societal, political, racial and economic struggles which existed in the post-Civil War South.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1466449 (stock #B308)
Stonegate Antiques
$175.00
Published in 1926 by the Whitman Publishing Company of Racine, Wisconsin, this very rare, miniature-size, HARDCOVER book measuring just 4x5 inches, offers a very unique continuation of the original Little Black Sambo story! It is thought that this mini size Sambo book was manufactured as a salesman's sample edition, meant to be strictly used as a marketing prop to sell orders for the full-size edition of the same book.

Entitled A New Story of Little Black Sambo, this tale picks up the story with Little Sambo's mother, Black Mumbo, exclaiming that Sambo, after almost losing his best Sunday clothes to the tigers, would- from now on- only be allowed to wear his every day clothes. Now very unhappily dressed in only a grass skirt, a pouting and naughty Sambo decides to run off into the jungle once again without permission, and climbs a tree to gather coconuts. A tiger soon arrives threatening to eat Little Black Sambo, trapping him up in the tree for the entire day! Eventually, Tusker the Elephant arrives, successfully chasing off the tiger and saving Sambo. Sambo then returns home, where an angry Black Mumbo spanks him with a hairbrush for running off, despite the gift of coconuts Sambo hoped would appease his mother. The conclusion of the tale then moves forward one month later when the family goes to visit Little Black Sambo’s cousins, the Bimboes, who admire his fine Sunday best clothing that he was finally allowed to wear again!

Although no author is attributed, it is thought by some that the tale was co-authored by the book's two illustrators, Clara Bell Thurston, who rendered all of the lovely colored drawings and Earnest Vetsch, who rendered the "black and white" illustrations (which, actually, are done in navy blue ink) as well as the fancy hand-lettering of the text which further embellishes the book.

With 36 unnumbered pages which alternate between the superbly rendered color and navy blue line illustrations, this unique little book is in near mint condition. The original paper dust jacket is present and in wonderful condition, and at some point, it was protectively covered with a contemporary, clear, dust jacket protector that can be removed if so desired. No fading of color, no rips, creases or missing pages. Binding is tight with all three original staples present. Cover edges are subtly worn, and a one-time owner, Neva Merchant, signed her name on both front and back interior covers.

This very rarely-found, miniature-size edition of the continuation of the original Little Black Sambo story is a must have for the collector of Little Black Sambo books!

To see all of the Little Black Sambo items currently available for sale, simply type “Sambo” into the search box on our website homepage.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1910 item #1444733 (stock #B296)
Stonegate Antiques
$795.00
Presented as a historical and cultural artifact, this extraordinarily RARE, very, very scarcely found, cloth book entitled "Pickaninny ABC" was published in London, Patented March 7, 1905, Number 39, by Dean's Rag Book Co. Ltd. The book measures 8.50 inches long x 6.75 inches wide, and is the companion volume to the also exceedingly rare 1904 Dean's Rag Book, "Ten Little Indians" which I have had the pleasure to offer for sale only twice in my decades-long antiques career (see final photo for a cover shot of the companion Ten Little Indians book).

Each of these rag books were published as alphabet and numerical teaching tools for the very young children of the wealthier class who could afford to purchase books to furnish their children's home library as well as to support their early home-tutorial education.

While clearly overtly racist in title (pickaninny) and conceptualization ("A" stands for Alabama Coon, "P" stands for Pickaninnies), the book also promotes age-old stereotypes as well ("W" stands for Watermelon, "U" stands for Uncle Tom, "H" stands for Hen-Roost, "C" stands for Cake Walk, etc) that were, unfortunately, acceptable societal references at the turn of the twentieth century.

This 116 year old book remains in all-original, very good condition with no alterations or repairs. While the front and back covers exhibit significant age-related staining, the interior pages are significantly "cleaner" and the illustrations remain very brightly colored. Interior pages present varying degrees of very light soiling, light foxing, and yellowing of linen, commensurate with age. The exterior binding has teeny spots of wear to the first layer of binding fabric which do not impact binding integrity. Top and bottom edges are subtly frayed.

This book is in truly remarkable condition for its age and in consideration of its all-cloth construction. This title is very RARELY found in today's market and is the first I have ever had the pleasure of offering for sale in my nearly 40 years dealing in this field! This is an absolute cornerstone piece to any serious Black Memorabilia collection!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #162986 (stock #BA327)
Stonegate Antiques
$195.00
An unusual piece, this delightful, cloth Mammy Broom Doll from the 1940's measures 12.5 inches high with a total height of 31 inches including the broom.

Mammy's wonderful, smiling face is hand-stitched and her clothes are machine sewn. Her blouse is seersucker, and her head, arms, skirt, apron, and cap are cotton. Her head, arms, and upper torso are stuffed with cotton batting. The natural bristle broom fills out both Mammy's torso and skirt & the wooden broom handle extends upward through her neck and head.

Mammy is in all original condition with no mends or repairs. The structural integrity of the broom remains quite sound, and Mammy, herself, is free of holes and tears. Her once-red skirt has now faded to pink. Her white cotton apron and cap have been cleaned removing nearly all traces of old stains, dirt, and dust. Photo number 2 shows her outfit BEFORE cleaning; all other photos reflect her appearance after cleaning.

A fabulous piece of vintage Black Americana, and a seldom seen form of the Black Mammy Doll!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1920 item #428076 (stock #BA525)
Stonegate Antiques
$625.00
Having conceived of the revolutionary idea of a lithographed, molded-mask doll face in 1901, New Yorker, Albert Bruckner applied for and was awarded the patent for his idea that same year. All Bruckner dolls were then stamped, "PAT'D JULY 8th 1901" on the lower right neck edge.

From 1901-1924, Bruckner produced this original, 12" Topsy Turvy doll for Horsman's Babyland Rag Doll line that features Caucasian, "Betty", on one end and African American, "Topsy", on the other. The inspiration for this doll is based on the character of Topsy in Harriet Beecher Stowe's classic 1852 novel, "Uncle Tom's Cabin".

The Bruckner Topsy Turvy doll was advertised in a 1907 Babyland Rag Doll catalog as follows:

"TOPSY-TURVY---What is this?
Looks like just a pretty miss.
But turn her over and you'll find,
She is quite another kind.
First she's White and then she's Black,
Turn her over and turn her back.
Topsy that side--Betty this--
Yet complete, each little Miss."

The detail on this hard to find classic doll is lovely. Both heads indeed have the pressed, molded mask faces with lithographed features. Topsy's face is in mint condition! Betty's face is very fine with superficial rubs to the flesh-toned coating of her mask; her lithographed facial features, however, remain beautiful. (Such rubs are not unexpected as these particular doll masks are, unfortunately, prone to rubbing.)

Grinning Topsy has red bows tied to her black mohair braided pigtails which are tucked into her red headscarf. Her red blouse, which matches her head scarf, is trimmed with cream banding around the sleeve and neck edges. The cream scarf she wears around her shoulders tucks into her very full, red/cream checked, gingham skirt. Flip her over, and....

Betty's more subtle Anglo face and her hair are lithographed. She wears the same red/cream checked gingham fabric of which both her dress and ruffled bonnet are constructed. Over her very full gingham dress, Betty also wears a sheer, ruffled pinafore.

Both dolls have the typical "mitten" hands of the stuffed rag dolls of this era. There are no other difficulties to report other than the rubs to Betty's face and some tiny, stray (original) glue spots here and there. No rips, tears, soiling, or odors, and she has been stored in a smoke-free home. The photos show it all- these two girls are a charming pair! A very difficult to find doll in near excellent condition!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #1485241 (stock #BA1000)
Stonegate Antiques
$35.00
Offered are two, VERY RARE, 1880's, romantically-themed advertisements printed in Germany and sold by the Bim Brothers, London. The two advertisements both feature well-dressed African American gentlemen attempting to woo and capture the exclusive attentions of pretty young African-American ladies, one via a banjo serenade and the other via an offer of lovely flowers.

The products which these advertisements were meant to endorse is unknown. The advertisements feature a high-shine, glossy finish which compliments the beautiful detailing and intense coloring of each piece. Both would look fabulous framed!

The advertisement featuring the banjo playing gent (with that snarling black dog in the lower right corner) measures approximately 7.25 inches wide x 10.25 inches long. The advertisement featuring the shy woman being presented with pretty flowers measures approximately 7.25 inches wide x 9 inches long.

Please note that any white specks that seem prominent in the closeup photos are the result of light bouncing off the surfaces of the aged advertisements. These pieces are approximately 140 years old, and while in very good condition given their age, both do have tiny surface imperfections, lines and light edge wear. The advertisements are priced at $35 each or two for $60.