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All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #264029 (stock #BA382)
Stonegate Antiques
$125.00
Measuring just 11 inches tall, this sweet cloth doll with a composition face may be placed in either a standing or sitting position.

Her composition face is in impeccable condition with sharp, well-drawn painted facial features. Her face is further accented by 3 darling curls peaking out from under her brightly colored cloth bandanna!

Her body is machine-stitched cotton fabric stuffed with sawdust. On the back of her right thigh, her place of origin is stamped: "POLAND". Her little flowered skirt is also machine stitched and is the only piece of clothing that may be removed.

Condition is superb with the exception of a hand-stitched repair to the seam line of her left foot where the foot is joined to the leg. Does not detract.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1215172 (stock #BA868)
Stonegate Antiques
$145.00
Measuring just barely 6 inches in length, this fabulous example of 1920's folk art and hand craftsmanship exemplifies the stereotypical Mammy of the early 20th century.

Constructed with care and skill, Mammy's floral dress, white apron and white under-pantaloons were neatly machine stitched. Her facial features--- eye brows, eyes, nose, and lips --- are hand-stitched with embroidery thread. She has yarn-constructed black curls peeking out from under her red and white polka dot head scarf. Her arms, torso and head are stuffed with cotton or cloth scraps with the torso securely tucked over the top of the clothespin and into the pantaloons. Her black-painted clothespin legs are hidden under her long skirt.

A very sweet little doll in wonderful all-original condition-- no repairs, rips, stains or odor. Displays quite nicely!!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1273763 (stock #BA922)
Stonegate Antiques
$395.00
Measuring 7.5 inches long x 10 inches high, this rarely-found, circa 1930's, wooden pull toy depicting a Smiling Black Boy is fully functional! He was manufactured by Wood Commodities Corporation, New York, and was called, not the typical Sambo as one might expect, but "Little Jasper"!

Little Jasper was created by George Pal, a cartoonist who worked for Paramount Studios and who created the Puppetoons, a popular cartoon series played in movie theaters of the era prior to the screening of the feature film.

Push or pull him along, and he twirls around while the two present wooden flowers spin along with him! (One wooden flower top is, unfortunately, missing--the only imperfection to this fabulous toy!)

Overall condition is rated as excellent, barely-used condition! There is very insignificant edge wear to paint here and there, but the four wheels don't show even the tiniest trace of wear from use, suggesting that this toy quite likely sat either in a display cabinet or was packed away for its entire existence! Even the original, paper manufacturing sticker remains intact and in pristine condition!

"Little Jasper" is very RARELY found, and the opportunity to acquire him should not be overlooked!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1837 VR item #1469991 (stock #BA974)
Stonegate Antiques
$1,995.00
These authentic and extraordinarily RARE, hand-forged, wrought iron, Slave Ship Ankle Shackles were de-accessioned from a private collection. Ankle shackles such as these were used to restrain and imprison kidnapped Africans below decks in the slaver ships' holds during what is known as the ‘Middle Passage’, the brutal voyage endured by captured Africans from the West Coast of Africa to enslavement in the Americas- the second portion of what was known as the transatlantic slave trade.

While the precise age of this late 18th to early 19th century old shackle is unknown, this type of ankle shackle has been documented to have been in use as far back as the 1780's by English slave traders, and was likely in continued use up until the 1860 onset of America's Civil War.

In 2015, the International Slavery Museum in Liverpool, England, acquired a set of ankle shackles very similar to the set offered here. In referring to the museum's acquisition, the museum's Head, Dr Richard Benjamin, related the following:

“A similar pair of shackles was purchased in Liverpool by the campaigner Thomas Clarkson in his antislavery crusade as evidence against the transatlantic slave trade. They were presented in front of Privy Council in 1788 as part of its enquiry into the transatlantic slave trade. An engraving of the shackles with a detailed description also appeared in Clarkson’s antislavery pamphlet."

These hand-forged, wrought iron ankle shackles remain in all-original and untouched condition, measuring approximately 11.75 inches in length. The cuff sizes vary slightly ranging from approximate lengths of 3.75 to 4 inches and approximate widths from 2.75 to 3 inches, a set likely used on a female slave. The shackles can be described as consisting of a wrought iron bolt with a pair of loops slid onto it via holes in both ends of each loop. One end of the iron bar is fixed closed by a triangular-shaped flange large enough to prevent the loops from being removed from the bar. The other end of the bar ends in a circular "eye" that is secured closed by a hand-wrought circular "lock washer" inserted at the time the shackles were applied.

An utterly gruesome, tangible testament to the malevolence and horrors of slavery and the transatlantic slave trade.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #1437065 (stock #B319)
Stonegate Antiques
$395.00
Presented as a historical and cultural artifact, this seldom-found, vintage, 1942, Ten Little Colored Boys book illustrated by Emery I. Gondor and published by Howell, Soskin Publishers, New York, is in very good condition.

Measuring 10.75 inches wide x 8.25 inches long, the book has seen extremely gentle use as evidenced by the minimal wear of the little boys' heads which, while providing visual interest, are primarily present to allow easy turning of each page. Given this purpose, it is quite remarkable that all heads remain present after 80+ years, with prominent creasing only appearing at the neckline and lessor crease lines present elsewhere on the heads. Four of the heads have suffered minimal tearing at the neckline, and were, at some point, restored and secured with what appears to be an archival quality tape. Front and back covers are constructed of heavy cardboard, the pages of heavier stock paper. Both the front and back boards evidence minor corner and edge wear along with minor soiling from handling. The front cover has a tiny 1/4 inch long tear at the binding, about 1 1/2 inches down from the top of the book. The back cover at the exterior upper corner is missing a small section of the top layer of cardboard. Interior pages are intact and crisp. Please view photos.

The book retains its brilliant, bright, crayon-box-like colors. The book has ten pages with alternating color and black and white illustrations as noted in photos. Sufficient space to post photos of all pages does not exist, but those present are representative of overall condition. Pages evidence some extremely minor age-discoloration and/or foxing, but all pages are free of rips and creases. The binding is tight and the book retains its original, red, binding spiral.

Originally published in 1868 under the Title of “The Ten Little Indians,” this poem was used during minstrel shows, which oftentimes were traveling acts, performed by white actors in blackface following the Civil War. The following year, the poem was adapted to this overtly horrid, racist rendition, replacing the word Indians with “Nigger” in both minstrel shows, printed sheet music, and children’s nursery rhyme books. This version married the stereotypes of violence and ignorance within the African-American population with the intent of "villain-izing" freed black males while simultaneously allowing violent acts to befall the black characters portrayed in the rhyme.

This 1942 version having changed the derogatory term nigger to that of colored (equally derogatory), also depicts a somewhat tempered portrayal of the violence befalling the characters as compared to earlier versions of the rhyme.

The poem:
Ten little colored boys sitting in a line; one slid off the roof, then there were nine.
Nine little colored boys fished with worms for bait; one fell in the river, then there were eight.
Eight little colored boys flying up to heaven; one tried to parachute, then there were seven.
Seven little colored boys doing circus tricks; one teased an elephant, then there were six.
Six little colored boys found honey in a hive; one tried to pet a bee, then there were five.
Five little colored boys heard a lion roar; One didn't run in time, then there were four.
Four little colored boys started out to ski; One hit a snowman, then there were three.
Three little colored boys cooked some chicken stew; One ate the pot-ful, then there were two.
Two little colored boys playing with a gun; Thought it wasn't loaded, then there was one.
One little colored boy thought it would be fun to settle down and marry, then there was none.
He had a family of colored boys and then, before very long, there were ten of them again.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #1113134 (stock #BA804)
Stonegate Antiques
$325.00
Offered is a bucolic and beautifully-colored, medium-folio, copyrighted 1854, Nathaniel Currier, New York, lithograph entitled, "Catching A Trout". The image measures approximately 10" x 14", and depicts a fancily-dressed African-American man "netting" the trout caught by one of the two well-dressed gentleman enjoying a relaxing day of fishing. This Currier + Ives lithograph is infrequently found, and is quite highly collectible.

Condition of the litho is considered very good given the rich coloration that remains. Some minor wear does exist: 2 small tears measuring less than 1/2 inch each on either side border edge-- one in the trees on the right side and the other on the left side in the water. There are several teeny holes in the sky to the right of the bearded gentleman's fishing pole as well as one single hole in the black gentleman's hair. (Please see photos.) Some wear to the border at top as shown in photos.

Despite the noted imperfections, this lithograph displays beautifully, with rich color and crisp lines. It presently resides in an early 1920's frame; ideally from a conservation point of view, it would benefit from a re-framing with acid-free materials to continue to preserve its historic importance.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Contemporary item #1445689 (stock #G694)
Stonegate Antiques
$495.00
This extremely colorful, lighthearted, and energetic, signed, fine quality, Limited Edition, giclee print depicts a lively outdoor dining scene full of gaiety and camaraderie.

The image, itself, measures 32" long x 24" wide, while the framed artwork in total measures 41" long x 32.5" wide. The giclee print was framed using museum-quality, acid-free double-mat board and backing materials, within a fine quality solid wood frame and topped with non-glare glass. This artwork was purchased directly from artist, Kelvin W. Henderson, it was signed by him at the time of our purchase, and it cheerily hung in our dining room for ten years!

The artwork is actually brighter in color than my camera was able to capture- closeups appear a bit "darker" than reality. Condition is absolutely perfect! And its presence---well, it will command one's attention hanging on an entire wall-space all by itself! It is, as stated earlier, a Limited Edition giclee lithograph-- Number 18 of a 150 Limited Edition series, with an additional 50 canvas editions. The provenance of this piece with all details is attached on the back side of the artwork as seen in one of our photos. A buoyant and effervescent piece of art!

As this piece exceeds typical shipping criteria in terms of dimensional size and weight, we regret that we cannot offer free shipping. We will provide a $25 shipping credit, but the remaining cost of shipping will rest upon the purchaser.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #365284 (stock #BA425)
Stonegate Antiques
$58.00
Measuring 23 3/4 inches long x 15 ¼ inches wide when completely opened, this very charming, circa 1940s, machine-stitched, linen towel bears a very delightful, colorful stencil of the well-known Black Memorabilia character, Little Brown Koko eating a watermelon!

The story book, Little Brown Koko, was first published in 1940 by author, Blance Seale Hunt, whose character became so popular that a series of Little Brown Koko story book adventures followed in quick succession!

In excellent, spotless condition, the towel may be folded and framed if desired! A great companion piece for those who collect Little Brown Koko books!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #271729 (stock #BA391)
Stonegate Antiques
$85.00
An interesting and older circa 1940-50's, molded plastic, African female doll carrying a tiny African baby doll in a pouch on her back!

Fine detailing hallmarks this 11.25 inch tall doll. She is dressed in a black native costume -- all handsewn with yellow and black beads, and is adorned with a matching double-strand beaded necklace and single-strand beaded bracelet along with gold hoop earrings. Her lips, as well as the baby's, are painted red and both have inset life-like, plastic eyes. Her hands swivel at the wrists; her arms and legs are jointed at shoulder and hip, respectively.

No identifying marks are evident; clothing is securely attached and could not be easily removed for a further look.

Condition is excellent with the exception of damaged toes on the right foot.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1266316 (stock #BA913)
Stonegate Antiques
$145.00
Measuring 1 3/4 inches in diameter x 5/16 of an inch high, this rarely-found, circa 1920’s, dexterity game depicts a small black boy with Fez blowing bubbles out of a pipe! The puzzle is quite colorful and is very visually appealing! The puzzle contains 4 tiny white balls of unknown material, that, with the proper manual dexterity, are to be placed in the four bubbles the boy is blowing!

Constructed of tin with a cardboard lithographed image and a glass cover, this game has a mirrored back. The puzzle is in all-original condition with the graphic remaining free of scratches and abrasions. The mirrored back shows evidence of subtle, minor scratching. (Please disregard any light or shiny spots in photos which are due to flash reflection off of the glass.)

A delightful piece of early Black Memorabilia!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #904409 (stock #BA851)
Stonegate Antiques
$475.00
This rarely found, 1937, tin, wind-up, DOUBLE JITTER-BUG Mechanical Dancing Toy was made by the Buffalo Toy & Tool Works. The Buffalo Toy & Tools Works was located in Buffalo, New York, and was established in 1924.

The toy is in very fine, working condition. When wound, the black dancers bob up and down, moving their hinged legs about and swinging their arms. The dancer's heads, bodies, and arms are constructed of flat tin, while their legs and feet are three dimensional. Other than a few light scratches here and there, the surface lithography and paint is in fabulous condition.

The toy measures 8” tall and 5 ½” wide. Marked with “MADE IN U.S.A.” on the back of the dancer's jackets as well as "MADE IN USA" and "PAT 2072308" (Patent Year 1937) on the bottom of the toy base.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #795143 (stock #BA348,49,5)
Stonegate Antiques
$235.00
This delightful grouping of 3 black Aunt Jemima composition dolls from the 1930s enjoyed an interesting, more recent life as advertising display pieces in an old Vermont Country store!

The 3 dolls were grouped together in a creative display that supported the sale of Aunt Jemima Pancake products! Their costumes are all identical and were hand-stitched and made especially for the planned Aunt Jemima display.

Each of the dolls remain intact inside an encasement of glue and paper wrapping and are attached to home-made, plaster-of-Paris-based, rectangular platforms. The platforms were created in 1958 as is written on the bottom of each base, and the dolls remained in place until the store closed in the early 1980s.

The large doll is 11 inches tall and evidences age-crackling to her composition face and hands; her right hand is actually missing a small piece of composition (see photo). Black hair peeks out from inside her checkered head scarf framing her sweet face!

The doll on the left side is the shortest, measuring 5 3/4 inches high. She is in fine condition and her eyes are placed in an interesting sideward glance.

The doll on the right measures 6 1/4 inches tall. Her composition is in fine condition with the exception to some small loss at the very top of her head (see photo).

Certainly a very visually appealing trio, sold all together as a group of three!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #383451 (stock #BA475)
Stonegate Antiques
$165.00
Measuring 6 1/2 x 11 3/4, this lovely, early 1900's, Black subject die cut by Enoch Morgan & Sons, England, features three individual Sapolio Soap die cuts used to advertise the company product. Each die cut features the head of a young black boy centered inside a piece of fruit or vegetable- a cabbage, a watermelon and a (?) pear.

Sapolio was a brand of soap noted for its unique and clever advertising, led by Artemas Ward from 1883–1908. Bret Harte, an American short story writer and poet, wrote jingles for the brand, and the sales force also included King Camp Gillette, who went on to create the fabulously successful Gillette safety razor and the razor and blades business model. Time magazine described Sapolio as "probably the world's best-advertised product" of its time period!

This pleasant trio of Sapolio Soap die cuts is in excellent condition and comes protected in an attractive, walnut-toned, oak decorative frame!

This very rarely found advertising trio together create quite a visually appealing decorative piece!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1910 item #1444733 (stock #B296)
Stonegate Antiques
$795.00
Presented as a historical and cultural artifact, this extraordinarily RARE, very, very scarcely found, cloth book entitled "Pickaninny ABC" was published in London, Patented March 7, 1905, Number 39, by Dean's Rag Book Co. Ltd. The book measures 8.50 inches long x 6.75 inches wide, and is the companion volume to the also exceedingly rare 1904 Dean's Rag Book, "Ten Little Indians" which I have had the pleasure to offer for sale only twice in my decades-long antiques career (see final photo for a cover shot of the companion Ten Little Indians book).

Each of these rag books were published as alphabet and numerical teaching tools for the very young children of the wealthier class who could afford to purchase books to furnish their children's home library as well as to support their early home-tutorial education.

While clearly overtly racist in title (pickaninny) and conceptualization ("A" stands for Alabama Coon, "P" stands for Pickaninnies), the book also promotes age-old stereotypes as well ("W" stands for Watermelon, "U" stands for Uncle Tom, "H" stands for Hen-Roost, "C" stands for Cake Walk, etc) that were, unfortunately, acceptable societal references at the turn of the twentieth century.

This 116 year old book remains in all-original, very good condition with no alterations or repairs. While the front and back covers exhibit significant age-related staining, the interior pages are significantly "cleaner" and the illustrations remain very brightly colored. Interior pages present varying degrees of very light soiling, light foxing, and yellowing of linen, commensurate with age. The exterior binding has teeny spots of wear to the first layer of binding fabric which do not impact binding integrity. Top and bottom edges are subtly frayed.

This book is in truly remarkable condition for its age and in consideration of its all-cloth construction. This title is very RARELY found in today's market and is the first I have ever had the pleasure of offering for sale in my nearly 40 years dealing in this field! This is an absolute cornerstone piece to any serious Black Memorabilia collection!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1910 item #1475900 (stock #BA387)
Stonegate Antiques
$35.00
Offered are five different, circa 1890-1901, Jim Crow era, stereoview cards, highlighting African-American history at the turn of the 20th century, some 120+ years ago. They feature: grueling rice field labor in South Carolina, a slave market in St. Augustine, Florida, a group of Florida sugar cane grinders, five English Springer Spaniels at U.S. Field Dog Trails being held at bay by a young black man, and seven very young black children seated on a mule awaiting orders for work in the fields.

The stereoview cards are titled: "Hoeing Rice, South Carolina", "Old Slave Market At St. Augustine, Florida", "Native Cane Grinders in Sunny Florida", "Who said quail?" (young man holding English Springer Spaniels) and "Waitin Fo De End Man" (7 Boys Sitting on a Mule).

The cards are priced at $35.00 each or all five cards for $140.00. All are in fine condition, and all but "Waitin Fo De End Man" and "Who said quail?" have a detailed, historical description on the reverse side.

As each is priced separately as stated, please specify which stereoview card(s) you wish to purchase so that we can customize your order form.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #795232 (stock #BA204)
Stonegate Antiques
$195.00
Measuring a total length of 26 inches including strings, this fabulous, late 1940's, black character marionette is in wonderful, never-played-with condition!

The puppet, itself, is 14 inches tall and is colorfully dressed in blue and white checked pants, red shoes, orange and whit polka dot shirt, straw hat and red patterned neck scarf.

The puppet's face is composition and bears evidence of some age-related crackling as noted in photos. He has a tiny piece if composition missing on the left side of his neck partially covered by his neck scarf, so it is very difficult to notice. He bears a manufacturer stamp on the bottom of his right foot, but it is partial and unreadable. His hands which hold colorful pink straw maracas are a heavy molded plastic.

The puppet is free of stains, dirt and odor. He retains his original black strings and wooden airplane controller!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #706524 (stock #BA670)
Stonegate Antiques
$75.00
Wonderful vintage 1940s hand-made sewing needle case of a little black girl with yellow bows in her braided hair and a pumpkin colored dress. Front of dress lifts up and there are two flaps for storing sewing needles. Very nicely made with fine detailing to face and hair construction--her little curls are tiny French knots. Excellent condition. Measures 6" long by 3" at the widest.
All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #1485187 (stock #BA999)
Stonegate Antiques
$1,595.00
Offered is an utterly fabulous, one-of-a-kind, 1880s, piece of original artwork by Edward West Merrill (1841-1910) of Concord, New Hampshire.

Merrill, known for creating extraordinary art collages of cut paper, cut birch bark, ink, and watercolor mounted on black construction weight paper, fashioned this particular piece depicting the fictional African-American Blackville Debating Society, by encompassing all of these preferred artistic mediums.

One can see the beautiful grain of the white birch bark Merrill used to execute each figure and form, which he then detailed using black ink and added depth and color by applying varying natural tones of watercolor. Merrill added additional elements of detail to the black mounting paper using a lighter toned ink, such as the entrance/exit door to the left of the moderator. The resulting work of art is simply exquisite!

Merrill's subject matter ranged from various genre pieces to racist scenes inspired by Solomon Eytinge, Jr.'s, (1833-1905) "Blackville" series that Eytinge created for Harper's Weekly in the 1870s. Merrill's artwork offered here was inspired by Solomom Eytinge's "Blackville" lithograph printed in the January 4, 1879, edition of Harper's Weekly. (A photo of Eytinge's litho is presented for client reference and comparison to E.W. Merrill's work and is not available for sale.) When comparing the two pieces, one will note that Merrill changed his artwork from that of Eytinge's by eliminating one of the "scorner's" in the right corner, many of the club members featured at the bottom Eytinge's litho as well as the signage above the debate moderator and by adding the 25 lb "Best Soap" box under the moderator's table leg.

At the base of this work reads the following: The Blackwell Debating Society- "Wedder Lord Dorwin Involved Hisself or Somebody Else." -The Scorner in the Corner Will Reply Drawn By E.W. Merrill Concord NH .

Measurements including the handsome, original oak frame are 26" wide x 18.5" in length. The original hanging eyelets have been removed for ease in shipping and are present under the tape as seen in the photo of the verso of the artwork.