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All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #283921 (stock #BA402)
Stonegate Antiques
$395.00
This handsome Black Memorabilia Male Golliwogg doll comes straight from an English home!

A brief history of the Golliwog doll: The Golliwog is based on a Black minstrel doll that the Victorian era illustrator, Florence Kate Upton, born in 1873 of English parents, had played with as a small child in New York. Upton's Golliwog character was first introduced to the world in her 1895 book entitled The Adventures of Two Dutch Dolls. Like the rag doll that inspired it, the Golliwog in her book was an ugly creature with very dark, jet black skin, large white-rimmed eyes, red clown lips, and wild, frizzy hair. Golliwogs are typically male and are generally dressed in a jacket, trousers, bow tie, and stand-up collar in a combination of red, white, blue, black, and occasionally yellow colors.

Measuring 21.5 inches long, this delightful and appealing cloth Golli is unmarked and is thought, by his original and quite elderly owner, to have been made in the mid 1940's! (She speculates that he could even be a bit older than that, but she remembers not acquiring him until after the end of WWII.)

His nose and mouth are hand-stitched and he has round, cloth covered button eyes- the pupils were hand-colored using black ink! His nicely coiffed, black hair appears to have been styled from soft, "stuffed animal-type" fur! Rather interesting and ingenious! He has a machine-stitched, cotton batting stuffed, black sock cloth body. His colorful wardrobe is also machine stitched- green wool mourning coat, gold vest, and red and white polka-dotted cotton pants and matching bow tie!

He is in wonderful condition with the exception of some tiny moth holes to the back of his mourning coat (see photos) as well as another tiny moth hole to the back of his right arm and back right pants leg. The polka dot clothing shows the slightest hint of fading. His dark black fur hair also shows some age-related color change to brown at the roots. Hmm...then again...perhaps he's simply overdue for another hair coloring appointment at the Salon!

A very sweet addition to one's Black Memorabilia or Golliwogg collection!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #404205 (stock #BA504)
Stonegate Antiques
$245.00
Measuring 13 inches high, this delightful, hand-made, brother and sister pair of Black cloth dolls were made circa 1940's, by "Roxie" of Asheville, North Carolina, as attested to by the dollmaker's tag sewn on the brother's backside.

Both dolls are in near perfect condition with the exception of a tiny teardrop mark under brother's left eye and a tiny hole next to sister's left side of face on her hairline. Detailing is very sweet with nicely embroidered facial features and color-coordinated, machine-stitched clothing. Hair is authentic looking made of fuzzy wool yarn-- brother's hair is curly and nubby--- sister's is done in a head full of bow-tied pigtails! Bodies are machine-stitched, brown cotton that are each stuffed with cotton batting.

A pair of cuties!!!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #674752 (stock #BA660)
Stonegate Antiques
$285.00
Measuring 3.25 inches high, this delightful English child or baby transfer porcelain mug is a quite rare find!

In excellent condition with the exception of some minor wear to the gilt rim and scripted banner, the cup or mug features two gentleman sharing a tub bath- one Caucasian and one African-American. The African-American gent is surrounded by musical notes indicating that he is doing quite a bit of whistling, while the Caucasian gent covers his ears in annoyance. The scripted banner above their heads reads, "Whistling Rufus." "There's music in the air."

The mug is signed in the lower right corner of the tub, "Copyright Sid Smith". The base bears the black crown and banner stamp of Allertons, England as well as the printed, red-inked number "2089".

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #860141 (stock #BA0000)
Stonegate Antiques
$40.00
Offered are five, VERY SELDOM found, 1880's & 1890's, Black Memorabilia-themed trade cards priced at $40.00 each or all 4 for $140.00.

The AYER'S Cathartic Pills card is copyrighted 1883 in the lower right front corner by the J.C. Ayer Company Company, Lowell, Massachusetts. This card is brilliantly colored with a phenomenal graphic of the Black "Country Doctor" holding a small child who clutches an Ayer's Pills advertisement in her hand. The reverse side carries a testimony to the wonder of the multitude of curative properties of Ayer's Pills. The card measures 2 5/8 inches x 4 3/4 inches.

The J.P. Coat's Company card is not copyrighted but is at the latest, a circa 1890's card, and features a smiling African-American boy seated on a spool of Coat's thread tickling a bright yellow shining sun. The card measures 3 inches x 4.50 inches. The reverse side is an advertisement for J.P. Coat's Fast Black Spool Cotton thread.

The Clarke's Spool Cotton Thread advertising card is SOLD. It measures 2.75 inches x 4 3/8 inches and features an African-American boy beating a drum which advertises Clarke's MILE-END Spool Cotton. The litho is marked on back "Donaldson Bros, Five Points, New York". The reverse side further advertises Clarke's Thread.

The fourth card is another J.P. Coat's Thread card depicting a humorous scene of an African-American couple attempting to move a very stubborn mule. The card measures 3 inches x 4.75 inches. It is copyrighted on the reverse 1881 by Auchincloss & Brothers, New York. The reverse side advertises the myriad of J.P. Coat's products.

The fifth card is another Clark's Mile-End Spool Cotton advertisement that features a humorous lithograph of a well-dressed African-American man being tripped by a young Caucasian boy holding Clark's super-strong thread, and measures 2.75 inches x 4.50 inches. The reverse side is a continuation of testimony and advertisement for the product.

All five trade cards are in very fine condition with nice color and some very subtle evidence of age staining as seen in photos. The cards have no rips, bends, or fading.

These seldom-found trade cards would look fabulous framed as a group!

As each is priced separately (see photos for pricing), please email us stating which item you wish to purchase so that we can customize your order form.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #596309 (stock #BA641A)
Stonegate Antiques
$75.00
This is an authentic signed baseball from former Negro League baseball player Luther "Luke" Atkinson. The ball was signed at an autograph show in March 2006. Luther "Luke" Atkinson was #20, a stand-out performer for the Wilson, North Carolina All Stars, the Carolina Tigers, and the Satchel Paige All-Stars, who played baseball in the Negro Leagues from 1955 to 1960, starting his career right out of high school. As of spring 2018, Mr. Atkinson, who lives in Maryland, remains an active volunteer in the newly opened, Hubert V. Simmons Museum of Negro Leagues Baseball, Inc., at the new Owings Mills Metro Centre Complex.

A brief history of the Negro League:

African Americans first began to play baseball in the late 1800s on military teams, college teams, and company teams, eventually finding their way to the established professional baseball teams of white players. However, racism and “Jim Crow” laws would force African Americans from these teams by 1900, with black players left to form their own teams.

In 1920, an organized league structure was formed under the guidance of Andrew “Rube” Foster, a former player, manager, and owner for the Chicago American Giants. In a meeting held at the Paseo YMCA in Kansas City, Mo., Foster and several other Midwestern team owners joined to form the Negro National League. Soon, rival leagues formed in Eastern and Southern states, which brought black baseball to major urban centers and to rural countrysides in the U.S., Canada, and Latin America. The Leagues maintained a high level of professional skill and inspired economic development in many black communities.

In 1945, when Major League Baseball’s Brooklyn Dodgers recruited Jackie Robinson from the Kansas City Monarchs, Robinson became the first African American in the modern era to play on a Major League roster. While this historic event was a key moment in baseball and civil rights history, it marked the decline of the Negro Leagues. The best black players began to be recruited for the Major Leagues with their black fans following them, and the last Negro Leagues teams folded in the early 1960s.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1266374 (stock #BA916)
Stonegate Antiques
$275.00
Manufactured circa 1920's by the Wurts Creation Company, this scarcely-found, Black Chef, kitchen collectible doubles as both a string holder and a grocery list memo board!

Constructed of painted wood that is nailed and glued together, this vintage collectible retains quite a few of its original but yellowed-with-age grocery shopping list pages. The holder/board retains a ball of string and a stub of an older, red pencil. It also has an inkwell cut-out that would have accommodated a bottle of ink; presumably, an inkwell pen once resided beside it versus the current pencil.

The holder/board remains in all original condition with no repaint or repair. The black chef is not painted on but is a decal--all original. The pale blue paint has appropriate, minor, age-related wear as noted in photos.

Has great visual appeal and displays wonderfully!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #187364 (stock #BA380)
Stonegate Antiques
$55.00
This circa 1940’s Black Mammy doll is diminutive in size and delightfully detailed!

Measuring just 6 ½ inches tall with a skirt circumference of 4 ½ inches, her head, torso, and arms are constructed of fabric with an inverted basket serving as her skirt. Her clothing is machine-stitched with attention paid to detail: teeny gold fabric braiding serves as earrings and necklace; delicate lace accents her skirt hem; her red shawl features zig zag stitching accents; her face is finely hand-painted.

A sweet addition to one’s Black Memorabilia or Doll collection!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #264039 (stock #BA13)
Stonegate Antiques
$325.00
A very RARE and highly appealing Black Memorabilia Advertising Diecut!

Marked "Copyright 1924", in the lower left hand corner, this extremely hard-to-find advertising piece measures 10.5 inches wide x 13.5 inches high. Colorful and visually interesting, the heavy cardboard diecut depicts an engaging Uncle Wabash serenely strumming his banjo on his front porch! Guess the message to the consumer was, "Eat one of Uncle Wabash's cupcakes to experience your own little slice of heaven and serenity!"

Condition of this charming piece of Black Historical ephemera is quite good given its 80+ years of age!! Old water staining to bottom of the diecut does little to detract from the piece. Crease line to one cupcake edge. Appropriate age foxing to back.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #834220 (stock #B253)
Stonegate Antiques
$125.00
Offered is a wonderful 1934 edition of Topsy Turvy and the Tin Clown by Bernice G. Anderson and illustrated by Esther Friend.

This seldom found copy was originally published in 1932 by Rand McNally & Company of New York.

This copy has superficial scratches to the front and back covers, as well as surface soiling, and wear on book cover edges.(see photos). The front cover has a slight tear at the crease that does not effect strength or integrity of the cover board. A couple of pages have minor staining. The binding is super-tight and all pages remain present.

Topsy's adventures are divided into three chapters in length, approximately 59 numbered pages. Book is filled with a variety of black-ink and black and red illustrations as represented in photos. The story of Topsy was likely inspired by the Little Black Sambo stories which originated at the turn of the 20th century. PLEASE NOTE: in the photos, the printing seems light and faded- not so! It is merely the function of over-lighting or light reflection.

A wonderful and truly RARE book not to be missed!

Please see the other Topsy Turvy book available for separate purchase, a 1938 copy of Topsy Turvy's PigTails.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #435278 (stock #BA544)
Stonegate Antiques
$88.00
Black Memorabilia sewing items are becoming very difficult to find! Offered is a wonderful, 1930’s, cloth Mammy Pin Cushion!

While her little body was machine stitched together, the remainder of Mammy is all hand-completed! She has a sweet, cheerful, hand-embroidered face that is framed by a tall red, white and blue bonnet! She continues her patriotic look with a red and white checkered top and blue and white flowered pants---how racy---pants instead of a skirt!!!

Mammy clutches a gold colored tomato which, of course, is designed to keep the sewing pins!

In wonderful condition!! Just waiting to be displayed with other sewing or black American collectibles!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #1413567 (stock #BA822)
Stonegate Antiques
$350.00
Offered is the fabulously RARE BIGGER HAIR Negro Tobacco container produced from the mid 1940's through the early 1960's. This container is actually constructed of cardboard with tin base, and is much less frequently found, and thus, much more rare than the earlier, all-metal, and scarce-in-its-own-right, Nigger Hair container due to the greater fragility of cardboard as compared to metal, as well as the fewer numbers of cardboard containers produced.

Following the conclusion of World War II, the American Tobacco Company of Virginia changed its product name from Nigger Hair to Bigger Hair, seeking to broaden the product's marketing appeal as well as viewing the latter label as the more-socially acceptable one. (The earlier Nigger Hair moniker was used by the American Tobacco Company from the 1890's through the early, pre-WWII 1940s; the lithographed can was manufactured by the B. Leidersdorf Company, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.) Interestingly, the company DID NOT change the image of the African woman, but merely added the words Fiji Islander to the left of her face in its indifferent and weak attempt to move further away from the earlier, severely derogatory label.

Measuring 7 inches high x 5 3/4 inches wide, the container is in good condition, perhaps a 7 out of 10, with one side exhibiting minor surface scuffing, while on the other side more scuffs and rubs are evident. Some minor wear around the edge of the top of the container likely occurred from simply taking the cover on and off; however, this is completely concealed by the cover. The original cardboard cover was lost with the passage of time; the replacement tin cover shown was in place when this container was acquired.

The original brownish orange color of the container remains consistent throughout, and the structural integrity of the cardboard is quite sturdy. Superficial rust is evident on the inside and outside of the metal base; this rust does not impact integrity of the tin base. The container retains partial remnants of its paper Federal Revenue Tobacco seal on both sides.

This very rare tobacco container is just a wonderful example of latter Black Americana advertising. The container looks better "in person" than in the photos as the camera actually accentuated the appearance of the scuffing, especially on the "better" side!

If the Nigger Hair Tobacco container is currently in your collection, the addition of the Bigger Hair container will complete your collection from both a cultural and historical perspective!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1920 item #728714 (stock #BA680)
Stonegate Antiques
$495.00
Measuring 15 inches long by 13 inches wide, this delightful, unsigned, watercolor features a charming rendition of a young black boy straddling a fence while clutching a plump watermelon!

Remaining in its original frame with original wooden and paper backing, this watercolor retains its framer's identifying sticker which reads, "Staton's Art Shop 5409 Germantown Ave." Perhaps this Germantown address indicates Philadelphia area origin? In the interests of proper conservation, the new owner should re-frame this lovely piece with appropriate acid-free materials.

Please ignore any white streaks seen in photos; these are the result of light reflection off of the glass.

A lovely watercolor- nicely executed!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #336030 (stock #BA282)
Stonegate Antiques
$125.00
Measuring approximately 4 1/2 inches in length, this wonderful pair of hard plastic African Native dolls are dressed in highly detailed and decorated costumes. Circa 1940s, these all-original dolls with hand-painted faces are in very fine condition and make a striking pair when displayed!

The female is clothed in a green felt dress and head piece that are decorated with tiny blue and white beads. She wears double strand white beaded bracelets and anklets and also wears a double stranded white beaded necklace with a large red bead center. Underneath her dress in back a tiny head peeks out- a little plastic baby that she is carrying!

The male is clothed in a brown and red polka dotted skirt with 2 fur pouches, and a fur headdress. He is swathed in longer strings of beads that encircle his waist and also run diagonally across his chest. He, too, wears a double stranded beaded anklet and necklace. Larger Red beads hang from the sides of his dress as well as from the 2nd fur pouch that hangs behind him.

The arms and legs are movable at hip and shoulder joints of each doll. The Male has the following in raised lettering on his back: P. M. and J. H. B. The remainder of the marking is obscured by beading and clothing. No other markings are visible.

A visually striking pair!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #798462 (stock #BA711)
Stonegate Antiques
$195.00
Measuring 11.75 inches high x 8 inches wide, this striking 1950's, ceramic, Black African in a Sea Shell, hanging wall planter is marked on back "House of Venice California".

In lovely condition with age crackling to the backside of the seashell, this stunning piece appears to have never been used for its original purpose as a hanging wall planter. The black paint is in impeccable condition and any white dots that appear in photos are the result of light reflection off of teeny glaze imperfections and are NOT chips, rubs or scratches to the surface. The gold stippling to the seashell is perfect!

The piece has a hole in the back to facilitate wall-mounting or it may be easily displayed on a shelf.

A very seldom found piece of vintage Black Memorabilia that is truly stunning in appearance!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #1208317 (stock #B286)
Stonegate Antiques
$425.00
Presented as an historical and cultural artifact, this seldom-found, vintage, 1942, Ten Little Colored Boys book illustrated by Emery I. Gondor and published by Howell, Soskin Publishers, New York, is in very good condition.

Measuring 10.75 inches wide x 8.25 inches long, the book has seen gentle use as evidenced by the fairly good condition of the little boys' heads which, while providing visual interest, are primarily present to allow easy turning of each page. Given this purpose, neck creasing and edge wear is expected and evident. Corner and edge wear of front and back boards is present, as is a brown oval stain on the front board near the word "little". Front and back covers are constructed of heavy cardboard, the pages of heavier stock paper. Both the front and back boards evidence age discoloration and some foxing, and a bit of vintage staining from handling on the back board.

The book retains its brilliant, bright, crayon-box-like colors. The book has ten pages with alternating color and black and white illustrations as noted in photos. I did not have sufficient space to post photos of all pages, but those present are representative of overall condition. Some pages evidence foxing, but all pages are free of rips and creasing. The binding is tight and the book retains its original, red, binding spiral.

Originally published in 1868 under the Title of “The Ten Little Indians,” this poem was used during minstrel shows, which oftentimes were traveling acts, performed by white actors in blackface following the Civil War. The following year, the poem was adapted to this overtly horrid, racist rendition, replacing the word Indians with “Nigger” in both minstrel shows, printed sheet music, and children’s nursery rhyme books. This version married the stereotypes of violence and ignorance within the African-American population with the intent of villainizing freed black males while simultaneously allowing violence acts to befall the black characters portrayed in the rhyme.

This 1942 version having changed the derogatory term nigger to that of colored (equally derogatory), also depicts a somewhat tempered portrayal of the violence befalling the characters as compared to earlier versions of the rhyme.

The poem:
Ten little colored boys sitting in a line; one slid off the roof, then there were nine.
Nine little colored boys fished with worms for bait; one fell in the river, then there were eight.
Eight little colored boys flying up to heaven; one tried to parachute, then there were seven.
Seven little colored boys doing circus tricks; one teased an elephant, then there were six.
Six little colored boys found honey in a hive; one tried to pet a bee, then there were five.
Five little colored boys heard a lion roar; One didn't run in time, then there were four.
Four little colored boys started out to ski; One hit a snowman, then there were three.
Three little colored boys cooked some chicken stew; One ate the pot-ful, then there were two.
Two little colored boys playing with a gun; Thought it wasn't loaded, then there was one.
One little colored boy thought it would be fun to settle down and marry, then there was none.
He had a family of colored boys and then, before very long, there were ten of them again.

To view other versions of this book presently available for separate purchase, please type the words "ten little" into the SEARCH box on our home page.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1224370 (stock #BA884)
Stonegate Antiques
$450.00
This fabulous 1930's American Beach cast iron sign reading "AMERICAN BEACH FLA Negro Ocean Playground" is in very fine condition with remnants of original paint and vintage patina. This is NOT a reproduction! This sign was originally sold to be used as a license plate topper by African American folks frequenting this beach. It measures 11 inches in length x 4.50 inches high at its tallest point.

American Beach was established in 1935 on Florida's east coast under the leadership of Abraham Lincoln Lewis, one of seven co-founders of the Afro-American Life Insurance Company, and one of Florida's first black millionaires. His vision was to create a beach resort as a benefit for company executives and as an incentive for employees.

In the era of Jim Crow segregation laws, few public places in Florida or the rest of the South were open to African Americans. From the Depression until well into the 1960's, American Beach served as a holiday and vacation destination for thousands of African Americans, and was a magnet for black celebrities such as entertainers Cab Calloway and Ray Charles, heavyweight boxing champion Joe Louis and writer Zora Neale Hurston.

But in 1964, the area began to decline. Hurricane Dora destroyed much of the beach, and passage of the Civil Rights Act meant that blacks were, finally, no longer restricted to segregated beaches and the businesses that catered to them.

A fabulous and historically relevant piece of Black Americana!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1910 item #365728 (stock #BA452)
Stonegate Antiques
$325.00
Measuring 11 1/4 inches wide x 14 ¼ inches high, this wonderful, subtly colored, all original, Cream of Wheat puzzle featuring the ever-smiling Rastus holding a scythe in a wheat field is a based upon the 1907 advertising lithograph entitled, “What shall the Harvest be?”

The character of Rastus was based on an actual person- a black waiter from Chicago- who was paid $5 for the use of his image by Colonel Mapes, the General Manager of the Nabisco Company, the owner of Cream of Wheat. The company began using the waiter’s image in the early 1900’s, replacing the original woodcut of a black chef that appeared on the packaging from 1894 until that time. Interestingly from a social and historical perspective, the depiction of the ever-pleasant, always-smiling Rastus was both a subtle yet positive departure from the extremely derogatory advertising much more typical of the era- advertising that nearly always featured blacks with wildly contorted and exaggerated features most often in very undignified poses and predicaments.

This beautiful, scarcely-found puzzle, which is in excellent condition, is attractively framed in a hardwood molding colored in walnut, ebony and gold. The puzzle frame is original to the puzzle, and it is contemporary to the production date of the puzzle as it still retains its original wood panel backing, a framing technique not typically found after 1910. The puzzle pieces, themselves, are very finely and delicately cut, and are of a much smaller size than what is typically found in puzzles dating from the 1920’s and beyond.

A phenomenal piece that would be a centerpiece to any serious Black Americana, Advertising, or Cream of Wheat collection!

PLEASE NOTE: Any discoloration, white spots, or other unnatural variances in color are due to the unavoidable light reflections caused by the glass in the framing. The presence of the glass made photography quite a challenge!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1970 item #272518 (stock #BA393)
Stonegate Antiques
$65.00
Measuring 23 inches long x 4 inches wide, this circa 1960's, sweet, little black man, sewing caddy is constructed primarily of felt with metal and plastic decorative detailing.

Quite multi-purpose in nature, his legs hold spools of thread, and under his red vest, he hides a pincushion (his chest) along with 2 felt strips for needle and pin storage (his arms)! Four decorative plastic rings can be used to hold safety pins! He also sports a ring on the top of his hat to allow one to hang him on the wall.

Condition is quite fine! No rips, stains or tears with just some subtle fading to his green felt bowtie and black face and legs--all age-related. He has two, insignificant moth holes on the BACK of his red vest.

Handy to keep by the sewing machine, but also just a delightful, vintage, Black Memorabilia whimsy to decorate your sewing room!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #878155 (stock #BA748)
Stonegate Antiques
$65.00
This artisan-made, vintage 1950s, utterly delightful, little Black Boy Hand Puppet is in wonderful, minimally-played-with condition!

This sweet little pop-eyed character was recently acquired from the artist's daughter who stated that her mother made the puppet for her in the late 1950's.

With hands and head constructed of papier mache and a machine-stitched cotton body, this 10.50 inch long puppet sat for years in a doll cabinet seeing minimal childhood play. The body is very lightly soiled from dust with some seam separation at each shoulder (see photo). The hands and head have acquired a bit of a crackled look due to age; however, there are no flakes or missing pieces.

He has a darling "look" and would make a whimsical addition to one's folk art, puppet or doll collection. This hand-made piece is a truly one-of-a-kind creation!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #853318 (stock #BA743)
Stonegate Antiques
$425.00
In the mid-1800's, an unknown artist painted the face of a young Black boy in warm, soft colors, and unbeknown to the artist, forever immortalized the young boy's image! Since that time a variety of items were been produced in the image of the "Young Black boy with the Torn Hat" or "Johnny Griffin".

This circa 1920-30's Johnny Griffin inkwell is constructed in solid brass and has a hole for both placement of pen and glass insert for ink. This piece is offered without the pen and glass ink insert.

It is in all original condition with delightful patina- not a reproduction- no replaced parts- and measures 6 inches long x 3.25 inches wide and 2 1/2 inches high. It does not retain any marking other than a mold number 4557.

Johnny Griffin Black Americana collectibles should form the cornerstone of any serious Black Memorabilia collection!

To see all of the Johnny Griffin items currently available for sale, simply type “Johnny Griffin” into the search box on our web home page.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #336069 (stock #BA207)
Stonegate Antiques
$75.00
Measuring 3 3/4 inches long, this circa 1920-30’s, miniature, Black Mammy doll is unique in construction- its head and body have been fashioned from an old rubber baby nursing nipple!

Mammy’s sweet little face has been carefully hand-stitched, and she has been nicely dressed in a red and green plaid dress with linen apron and red flowered head scarf. She holds a bunch of sticks in her right arm- presumably to add to a fire.

Condition of this wonderful miniature Mammy is excellent! Oftentimes, the nipple dries up and deteriorates, so finding a nipple doll in such fine condition is truly a treat!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1920 item #365744 (stock #BA453)
Stonegate Antiques
$150.00
Measuring 12 3/4 inches wide x 17 inches long, this brightly colored, all original, uncut paper doll entitled “Mammy Cook and Her Thanksgiving Dinner” published in the November 1912 edition of The Delineator Magazine is in excellent condition! Designed by Carolyn Chester for the Delineator, this Mammy paper doll was unique in that it was had a round base allowing it to stand freely when cut out!

Protected in an antique gold wooden frame with gold matting, this magazine sheet has retained all of the brilliance of its original color, making it a rather striking piece of wall art! Seldom located in such fine condition!

A striking piece that would be a colorful centerpiece to any Black Americana collection!

PLEASE NOTE: Any discoloration, white spots, or other unnatural variances in color are due to the unavoidable light reflections caused by the glass in the framing. The presence of the glass made photography quite a challenge!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #706869 (stock #BA672)
Stonegate Antiques
$95.00
Measuring only 2.75 inches high, this darling 1920's Black Memorabilia souvenir piece is in amazing condition considering its delicate, sea shell construction.

A tiny bisque black boy holding a watermelon slice is seated on a throne of sea shells. The name of the location that this sea shell souvenir was meant to commemorate is worn and is no longer readable.

Two very minor chips are present as shown in photos which do not detract from the beauty of this piece!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #1251320 (stock #BA902)
Stonegate Antiques
$995.00
Measuring approximately 10 inches long by 2.50 inches high, these untouched, unused, all-original, porcelain-enameled, 1940-50s, metal signs are extraordinarily RARE pieces of Black American history-- artifacts of the "Jim Crow" era when segregation of the African American race was unfortunately, most commonplace.

These signs were found in March of 1971, inside the abandoned and decaying basement of the former Philadelphia Enameling Works factory at the corner of 13th and Vine Streets in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The gentleman from whom these signs were purchased, bought these segregation signs along with hundreds of others signs of all types found in the basement of this former factory (see last photo) and has very kindly written a letter of provenance which has been photographed here and which will be included with these signs upon their sale.

These historic signs are enameled on both sides, and on the front sides are written, "COLORED MEN" and "COLORED WOMEN". The signs feature black lettering on a white background.

The signs are in all-original condition with some very minor discoloration and very unobtrusive edge discoloration pinpoints and some enameling loss here and there as seen in photos.

Extremely RARE, UNUSED, one-of-a-kind, museum-worthy pieces of Black American history that are quite likely the only ones of their kind extant today! Condition is amazing!

Also currently offered for separate sale at $895.00 and originating from this same collection is a pair of signs labeled "COLORED" and "WHITE". (See last photo) Please take a moment to view these signs by simply by typing the word "segregation" into the SEARCH box on our homepage.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #264047 (stock #BA386)
Stonegate Antiques
$95.00
Utterly fabulous Black Mammy Half Doll or Platform Doll or Toaster Doll!

This circa 1940's (perhaps even earlier!) Mammy has a polished cotton half body firmly stuffed with cotton batting which is attached to a fabric-covered, cardboard platform that enables her to sit. Such a doll is often referred to as a platform or toaster doll as her voluminous skirt was designed to cover unsightly kitchen appliances - most commonly the toaster!

Most notable is this Mammy's exquisitely executed, hand-embroidered face, and her elaborate dangling beaded hoop earrings!

Mammy's clothing is machine stitched and is absent of holes, rips or repairs. While all her patterned clothing retains its original and uniform coloring, all of the purple cloth has faded- obviously a less stable dye used there. When one opens the folds of the cloth, one sees the rich, deep purple it once was!

An unusually well-detailed doll for its type!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #1194900 (stock #BA844)
Stonegate Antiques
On Hold
Once part of the Middle Passage Museum inventory, this very remarkable piece of slavery ephemera documents a doctor's medical treatment of a negro slave woman--a very atypical occurrence in the Civil War era South, dated July 15, 1864.

Ready for framing, this unusual piece of history would be a fabulous addition to one's collection of slavery or medical artifacts. It measures approximately 7 inches wide x 1.34 inches high and would look fabulous double-matted in an exquisite frame.

The Middle Passage Museum was the dream of Jim and Mary Anne Petty of Mississippi as well as that of an anonymous Georgian benefactor who had together compiled a collection of slave artifacts numbering over 15,000 pieces and who had hoped to find a permanent site in Mobile, Alabama, for their museum. While they formed a non-profit organization to raise funds for their hoped-for museum, their dream was never realized.

In a 2003 statement, Jim Petty remarked, "The importance of the exhibit of these artifacts is to understand the harshness of what slavery and segregation was all about. The items in the exhibit remind us of the terrible heinousness of slavery. Viewing the collection can be very emotional, but it is a tool through which we can understand, honor and respect a great culture. We want to realize that out of slavery, a great culture emerged, and carried on, and continued to strive for a better life regardless of the adverse conditions that were placed upon them."

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #431754 (stock #BA537)
Stonegate Antiques
$595.00
Measuring 6 1/4 inches high x 5 3/4 inches wide, this circa 1930's, VERY RARE, Japan made, Polka Dot Kerchief, Mammy Head String Holder is in near mint condition with no chips, cracks, or hairlines! Mammy is the mate to the Maruhon Ware Mammy series--Cookie Jar, Basket Handle Biscuit Jar, Teapot and related kitchen items-- all made with this same Mammy's face.

The String Holder is stamped "JAPAN" on the back side, and it has a hole in the center of her mouth to accommodate the string! This wonderful piece has expected and typical glaze crazing and even comes complete with vintage string! On the upper right hand side of her forehead, these is a small white spot about 1/4 of an inch long where the face paint was not applied prior to factory glazing (see photo)- a tiny, insignificant manufacturer imperfection that does not detract from this rare piece! The entire piece is glazed with the exception of Mammy's lips which are cold-painted (meaning that the paint was applied after firing). As such, this area of paint would be the most vulnerable to wear, and Mammy does have 2 microscopically-sized specks on her upper lip where the paint has come off. Too tiny to be picked up in a photo!

Please note that photos were taken with a flash, so any white markings on the piece are flash reflections only and not imperfections.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #479335 (stock #BA564)
Stonegate Antiques
$395.00
A wonderful and quite rare piece of 1950's Black Memorabilia!!

This unique, Japanese made, 6" tall Black Sailor or Pirate ceramic nodder by UCAGCO is in mint condition--no cracks, chips, paint wear or repaint!!! Any white spots, etc in photos are purely the function of poor photography!

This interesting fellow wears blue and white striped pants, yellow and green shirt, and yellow jacket. His head nods "yes" and his flowered-painted fan can be made to wave in any direction.

Both head & fan have "Pat T.T." impressed on the weighted stem.

Truly a rarely found piece of Black Americana with a 2005 book value exceeding $450.00!!

All Items : Fine Art : Paintings : Watercolor : Pre 1940 item #113646 (stock #BA279)
Stonegate Antiques
$425.00
Signed in the lower left hand corner by the Brooklyn, New York, born LISTED American artist, Olga Lea Rosenson (Born September 10, 1892), this original watercolor portrait of a young "Black Shoe Shine Boy" intimately captures the soul of its subject as he pensively awaits his next customer.

Painted in 1934, the framed piece measures 20" x 26.5"; the watercolor, 13” x 19.5 “. Completed in various subtle tones of blue, gray, green, and brown. The watercolor was reframed in 1987 by the previous owner.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #383451 (stock #BA475)
Stonegate Antiques
$125.00
Measuring 6 1/2 x 11 3/4, this lovely, 1920's, Black subject diecut by Enoch Morgan & Sons, England, features three individual Sapolio Soap diecuts used to advertise the company product. Each diecut features the head of a young black boy centered inside a piece of fruit or vegetable- a cabbage, a watermelon and a (?) pear.

This pleasant trio of Sapolio Soap diecuts is in excellent condition and comes protected in an attractive, walnut-toned, oak decorative frame!

Quite visually appealing!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1910 item #877741 (stock #BAFolder)
Stonegate Antiques
$45.00
Measuring approximately 4.5 x 6.5 inches, this circa 1900 souvenir postcard folder is entitled, "Souvenir Folder of the Sunny South, The Land of King Cotton". It was printed by Curt Telch & Co., Chicago, Illinois.

The folder is undated and was never mailed. Some edge wear evident at corners and some slight separation at the seams of individual cards. While some photos may appear a bit blurry, this is a function of photography and not condition. All postcards are crisp and clear!

The Real Photo postcard folder features the lyrics of "Dixieland" and 18 full color scenes of industry common in the South during this period: cotton picking and production, tapping pine trees for turpentine production, watermelon farming, Razorback Hog farming and sugarcaning. All photos feature African-American laborers.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1920 item #793291 (stock #BA695)
Stonegate Antiques
$595.00
Measuring 6.25 inches long x 5 inches wide, this well detailed, circa 1910, brass ashtray depicts a smiling black male native reclining on a stylized seashell.

In fabulous condition with 90+ years of all original surface patina, this phenomenal piece is very highly detailed and displays wonderfully! It authentically depicts the highly fashionable Art Nouveau styling which was so wildly popular at the turn of the 20th century. This brass ashtray promotes the English settlement of the CONGO on the African continent, and thus, the words "CONGO" are impressed across the native's chest. The earliest version of this ashtray was crafted in BRONZE did not feature the Congo label across the native's chest.

A must-have piece for the sophisticated Black Americana collector!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1253944 (stock #BA905)
Stonegate Antiques
$125.00
Offered for separate purchase are two, RARELY FOUND, salesman sample boxes of Sharpoint Black Face Wire Cobbler's Nails measuring a very diminutive 2" tall x 1.25" wide and 1.75" tall x 1" wide!

The trademark for Sharpoint is a cleverly-designed, eye-catching, broadly smiling image of an African American gent. If one looks closely, one can clearly see the words "Sharpoint Cobblers Nails" printed within the black space of the gent's mouth! A very "sharp" advertising strategy!

Sharpoint Wire Cobbler's Nails were manufactured by the Charles F. Baker Co, Boston, Massachusetts. The smaller box retains its end flap which features both the manufacturing and patent information, with the patent number corresponding to a 1933 USA Patent date. Each box amazingly still retains the original cobbler's nails!

The boxes are in very good condition considering their age and the fact that they held tiny, sharp nails for over 80 years! As stated earlier, the smaller box does retain the end flap which features manufacturing info. The larger box is missing this flap. The cover litho on each box remains very crisp and clear. Typical, age-related edge wear is noted. Please peruse all photos for condition details. The boxes have been shrink-wrapped to protect the integrity of the cardboard, and they do contain the nails.

These VERY, VERY RARELY FOUND SALESMAN SAMPLE size boxes WITH ORIGINAL NAILS are offered at $125 each, or the two boxes can be purchased as a pair for $198.00 firm.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 2000 item #1370230 (stock #BA935)
Stonegate Antiques
$125.00
This delightful Black Boy Rag Doll has a face with a story to tell! What an expression!

Measuring 13 inches tall, he is constructed of black, machine-stitched, vintage 1930-1940's, polished cotton which has been stuffed with cotton batting. Facial features have been hand-embroidered, are quite expressive and are exceedingly well done. His hair has been styled in tightly wound little ringlets.

His brown-patterned, machine-stitched shirt and pants are also vintage 1930-40's fabric, accented with two miss-matched buttons holding up cute red suspenders.

A delightful piece of Black Memorabilia Folk Art! This wonderful, 1940's-vintage-look, one-of-a-kind, Artisan Doll was constructed in the 1990's by a Maine Folk Artist who is now deceased.

Please take a moment to view his big sister by typing the words "Maine Doll" into the SEARCH box.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #1413407 (stock #HelRid18)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Offered is a wonderful grouping of 16 Vintage, 1940-1960s, Black Americana Hair Pomade tins, Face Powder and as well as a bonus Benne Wafer Cookie Tin. This grouping is being sold on consignment, and is priced to sell!

1) A VERY RARE Item !!!= WWII Production (1941-1945), Big Bertha Hair Dressing, boxed, Victory Packaging: Printed on the base of the box, "By Using This ALL Paper Container We Are SAVING approximately 125 TONS of Metal Each Year to HELP WIN THE WAR". Prior to WWII, this pomade was offered in tins. Distributed by Dolly Dimple Laboratories, Atlanta, GA. Full of product. Never Opened. 9 out of 10 condition. Measures 2 5/8 inches high x 2 inches wide x 1 inch deep. Belongs in the Smithsonian's American History Museum in its WWII exhibit!

2) VERY SELDOM FOUND, C1940s, Hy-Beaute Slik-Down Pomade Hair Tin distributed by Hy-Beaute Chemical Co, Atlanta, GA. Measuring 2 7/8 inch diameter x 2 inches high. Empty. 9 out of 10 condition. Lovely!

3 & 4) Copyrighted in 1938, these two LUCKY BROWN Pressing Oil Tins are both in 9 out of 10 condition, and both are empty. These tins are highly decorative, colorful and display wonderfully. They measure approx 2 3/4 inches in diameter x approx 1 inch high. Distributed by Famous Products Co, Chicago, Illinois.

5) C1940s, Hi-Hat Jockey Club Face Powder Box, containing NUT BROWN Face Powder. Distributed by Hi-Hat Company, Memphis, Tennessee. Full, never opened. 9 out of 10 condition. Measures 2.5 inches square x 1/2 inch high.

6) C1940s, Improved QUEEN Hair Dressing tin, Very pretty little tin fair condition, contains product. Measures a diminutive 1.5 inches high x 1 3/4 inches wide x 3/4 inches deep.

7 -15) NINE, C1940, SAMPLE-SIZE tins measuring 1 1/8" diameter, distributed by Valmor Products Co, Chicago, ILL. Eight of the 9 tins are in excellent condition; one has slight scuffing on the back.

16) C1960's Benne Wafers Cookie Tin, distributed by Byrd Cookie Co, Savannah, GA. Very Good Condition. Measures 6 inches square x 2 inches high. Attractive cover graphic!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #1197569 (stock #BA850)
Stonegate Antiques
$895.00
Measuring 12.25 inches long x 8 inches in width, this two-sided, 19th century estate document listing all of the worldly goods of LEWIS MATTAIR is de-accessioned from the inventory of the ill-fated Middle Passage Museum (see museum history below). The document is undated but is estimated to be circa 1865-66 based on current research of federal and state archival documents.

This particular estate document is extraordinarily unique and atypical in comparison to other estate documents of this period as it lists 15 SLAVES among the articles of property, and it actually labels these individuals as SLAVES as opposed to the much more common and typical practice of listing "Slaves" as "Negroes". The slaves are listed on the back side of the document with all other inventory listed on the front side.

Each slave is listed by first name with the corresponding current market value written to the left of the name, with the total market value of the 15 slaves named at $8600-- quite a hefty sum when one considers that the remainder of the estate (furniture, livestock, transportation and work vehicles, tools, etc) is valued in total at $980.75. Also listed in the inventory was 13,000 pounds of seed cotton, indicating that Lewis Mattair owned a sizable cotton plantation, clearly farmed by the slaves.

Lewis Mattair is noted in the 1860 Federal Census as a resident of Suwanee County, Florida; the 1860 Federal Census- Slave Schedules references Lewis Mattair owning 28 male and female slaves, ranging in age from 4 to 58. Lewis Mattair is listed in the 1865 Florida Tax records, but his name does not appear in any archived state or federal records after that year. Thus, it is presumed that this document dates from or just prior to 1865, the year that the Civil War ended.

The Middle Passage Museum was the dream of Jim and Mary Anne Petty of Mississippi as well as that of an anonymous Georgian benefactor who had together compiled a collection of slave artifacts numbering over 15,000 pieces and who had hoped to find a permanent site in Mobile, Alabama, for their museum. While they formed a non-profit organization to raise funds for their hoped-for museum, their dream was never realized.

In a 2003 statement, Jim Petty remarked, "The importance of the exhibit of these artifacts is to understand the harshness of what slavery and segregation was all about. The items in the exhibit remind us of the terrible heinousness of slavery. Viewing the collection can be very emotional, but it is a tool through which we can understand, honor and respect a great culture. We want to realize that out of slavery, a great culture emerged, and carried on, and continued to strive for a better life regardless of the adverse conditions that were placed upon them."

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #807814 (stock #BA840)
Stonegate Antiques
$395.00
Measuring 8 inches long x 4 1/2 inches wide x 4 inches high, this colorful, 1920's, tin lithographed, wind-up toy featuring a Black Native Riding a Turtle is quite visually appealing!!

In very nice condition with minor scratches to paint here and there as seen in photos, this wind-up toy works, but the mechanism does have the tendency to stick a little. Marked J. Chein.

A must-have for the avid Black Memorabilia Toy collector!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #383446 (stock #BA482)
Stonegate Antiques
$125.00
Measuring 7 1/2 x 9 1/2, this lovely, 1930's, English or Continental origin, Black subject diecut features a very pretty, smiling young woman in a straw bonnet with book.

This pleasant diecut is in excellent condition and comes protected in an attractive, walnut-tone, oval decorative frame! The frame bears some minor veneer loss that does not impact the frame integrity, nor is it immediately noticeable.

A sweet piece!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1369660 (stock #BA931)
Stonegate Antiques
$145.00
Vividly colored, this unusual, C1920s, Black Memorabilia-themed, advertising diecut measuring 12 3/4" long x 8 1/2" wide, features two utterly horrified, shabbily attired, young, African-American girls faced with an encounter with a very diminutive, very equally-upset dog-- a deliberately crafted, most unfortunate, stereotypical image used to advertise who knows what back in the day!

Recently acquired from a private collection, the framed diecut is without glass (which can be easily and inexpensively added).

The embossed-surface diecut is in near excellent condition, the only noted issue being a crease in the bigger girl's left leg (see close-up photo). An unusual find, with vivid, colorful imagery!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #611220 (stock #BA642)
Stonegate Antiques
$425.00
Measuring 5 inches wide x 4.5 inches long, this 1920's, brass ashtray represents a very seldom-found offering of vintage Black Americana!

This piece was actually created to serve as an ashtray! It depicts a delightful image of a young black boy in a wide-brimmed straw hat!

In wonderful condition, this piece is stamped "LL" on back.

An uncommon piece of Black Americana that should not be overlooked!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #877763 (stock #BAFolder)
Stonegate Antiques
$50.00
Measuring approximately 4.5 x 6.5 inches, this January 7, 1930, postmarked souvenir postcard folder is entitled, "Souvenir Folder of Dixieland". It was published by Asheville Post Card Company of Asheville, North Carolina.

The folder was mailed, but remains in fine condition given its age. Some edge wear evident at corners. While some photos may appear a bit blurry, this is a function of photography and not condition. All postcards are crisp and clear!

The Real Photo postcard folder features the lyrics of "Dixieland" and 18 full color scenes featuring stereotypical and actual depictions of African-American southern life. Some politically incorrect and derogatory captioning. Scenes depicting the cotton and tobacco industries are also featured.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #1217332 (stock #BA872)
Stonegate Antiques
$1,295.00
Offered are an extraordinary and most rarely-found pair of early 19th century, child/young adolescent - size, Slave Rattle Shackles with one measuring approximately 4.75 inches tall by 7 3/8 inches wide and the other measuring 5.25 inches tall by 7.5 inches wide.

The oddly-shaped, hand-wrought shackles each have two lateral "pockets" that contain pieces of metal or balls that “rattle” as the wearer moves about, thus indicating the wearer's location. This type of shackle is noted in historical references as a Crab Rattler Shackle due to its visual similarity to that sea animal. Each shackle has a pair of small chain links attached at the top. One shackle would have been placed on each leg, and a metal chain would have then been threaded through the attached rings and secured with a lock.

The age of these shackles is formally listed as 19th century, but could very well be older, dating to the last quarter of the 18th century. Condition is quite good given age and use. Please note the small hole present on the side of one shackle as noted in photo. All original and untouched, an utterly horrible, tangible testament to the malevolence of slavery. A VERY RARE form of rattle shackle, even more particularly so due to its small size!

Also currently offered for sale and priced separately is a very diminutive child rattle shackle in an unusual form out of a South Carolina estate. Additionally, de-accessioned from the Middle Passage Museum is an ultra-rare set of 19th Century Slave Ship Shackles from a New Orleans, Louisiana, former slave trader estate! Please type the word "shackles" in the search box on our home page to find all sets of shackles currently being offered.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #487105 (stock #BA577)
Stonegate Antiques
$245.00
Measuring 6 inches high, this darling, mint condition, Black Memorabilia, pudgy and naked, Girl Child Nodder was made in 1950’s Japan by the Ardalt China Company. She modestly attempts to conceal herself by holding a pair of pink and red polka dotted panties in front of her! Such a sweet piece!

The child’s head nods up and down in a "yes" motion by pivoting on a tiny metal bar inserted through her neck (see photos).

Condition is mint, and the piece is signed on the bottom of her right foot: “Hand Painted Lenwile China Ardalt Japan 6530 B”.

Black nodders are quite difficult to come by and have become an interesting sub-collecting category in the field of Black Americana! Not to be missed!

Please see the equally-difficult-to-find companion piece also available - the Black Boy Child Clown Nodder by Ardalt, Japan!!!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1920 item #428076 (stock #BA525)
Stonegate Antiques
$625.00
Having conceived of the revolutionary idea of a lithographed, molded-mask doll face in 1901, New Yorker, Albert Bruckner applied for and was awarded the patent for his idea that same year. All Bruckner dolls were then stamped, "PAT'D JULY 8th 1901" on the lower right neck edge.

From 1901-1924, Bruckner produced this original, 12" Topsy Turvy doll for Horsman's Babyland Rag Doll line that features Caucasian, "Betty", on one end and African American, "Topsy", on the other. The inspiration for this doll is based on the character of Topsy in Harriet Beecher Stowe's classic 1852 novel, "Uncle Tom's Cabin".

The Bruckner Topsy Turvy doll was advertised in a 1907 Babyland Rag Doll catalog as follows:

"TOPSY-TURVY---What is this?
Looks like just a pretty miss.
But turn her over and you'll find,
She is quite another kind.
First she's White and then she's Black,
Turn her over and turn her back.
Topsy that side--Betty this--
Yet complete, each little Miss."

The detail on this hard to find classic doll is lovely. Both heads indeed have the pressed, molded mask faces with lithographed features. Topsy's face is in mint condition! Betty's face is very fine with superficial rubs to the flesh-toned coating of her mask; her lithographed facial features, however, remain beautiful. (Such rubs are not unexpected as these particular doll masks are, unfortunately, prone to rubbing.)

Grinning Topsy has red bows tied to her black mohair braided pigtails which are tucked into her red headscarf. Her red blouse, which matches her head scarf, is trimmed with cream banding around the sleeve and neck edges. The cream scarf she wears around her shoulders tucks into her very full, red/cream checked, gingham skirt. Flip her over, and....

Betty's more subtle Anglo face and her hair are lithographed. She wears the same red/cream checked gingham fabric of which both her dress and ruffled bonnet are constructed. Over her very full gingham dress, Betty also wears a sheer, ruffled pinafore.

Both dolls have the typical "mitten" hands of the stuffed rag dolls of this era. There are no other difficulties to report other than the rubs to Betty's face and some tiny, stray (original) glue spots here and there. No rips, tears, soiling, or odors, and she has been stored in a smoke-free home. The photos show it all- these two girls are a charming pair! A very difficult to find doll in near excellent condition!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #264054 (stock #BA387)
Stonegate Antiques
$29.00
With the exception of very minimal wear to edges, this circa 1890s stereoview card is in fine condition!

Labeled #298, "Native Cane Grinders in Sunny Florida", the scene depicts 7 young Black men either chewing on a sugar cane stalk or holding a sugar cane cutting implement.

Printed on the back of the card is a brief history of sugar cane cultivation from its origins in 500 AD China to its introduction in the US in 1675 by the Jesuits. The harvesting process is also discussed.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #560821 (stock #BA616ABC)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Measuring 8.5 x 11 inches, this vintage 1934, paper, window advertisement promotes the "COTTONTIME MINSTREL" show at Kenilworth School on Friday, November 2, 1934, at 8:15PM!

Poster reads further: "Benefit- Pals Bible Club-Elm Street Baptist Church". "Directed by Churchill Traylor". Features a very sweet Black Minstrel caricature graphic! It is believed that this event took place in the Petersburg, Virginia area.

Fine condition with very subtle age-related edge tears that do not interfere with image. Would look just wonderful framed!!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1403318 (stock #07HelRid)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Measuring 7 3/4 inches long x 4 inches wide (at the widest points on each spoon rest), these VERY RARE, 1930’s VINTAGE, Cast Iron, Aunt Jemima / Mammy and Uncle Mose / Black Man Chef spoon rests sport the mellow look of years and years of use along with the wonderful, smooth, silky feel of the surface of genuine antique ironware! These are NOT reproductions!

The well-appointed Chef Uncle Mose sports a very wide grin and holds a bowl of eggs in his right arm and a wooden mixing spoon in his left. He is in very fine condition with a very subtle suggestion here and there of a remnant of his original gold paint. There are subtle dings to the backside as well as evidence of superficial surface rust. The following is imprinted on the Chef's backside: “Compliments The Toledo Stove And Range Co”, although the striking of the "O" and "L" are very faint. This imprint documents the spoon rest’s original function- continuous promotional advertising presented as a free giveaway to buyers purchasing the company’s products!

The well-dressed Aunt Jemima Mammy sports a wide grin and holds an iron in her right hand and other household implements in the left. She is in very fine condition with a smattering of some very subtle superficial rusting here and there. Evidence of the original gold paint is also subtle but can be seen. The back side of the spoon rest is perfect and looks as though it came right out of the factory just yesterday with a very solid and clear imprinting of the Toledo Stove Company advertising.

A very rare find!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #676629 (stock #073(BA))
Stonegate Antiques
$68.00
Measuring just 5 inches high, this darling piece of Black Memorabilia is as functional as it is cute! Featuring a painted bisque black boy eating the stereotypical watermelon, he sits on a small pin cushion in the shade of a tree constructed of a genuine cotton boll!

The bisque was likely made in Japan and then shipped to the USA for assembly as a Southern States souvenir piece. In wonderful condition with just the tiniest bit of wear to the paint here and there--appears to have never been used as a pincushion.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #192626 (stock #BA353A)
Stonegate Antiques
$65.00
Measuring approximately 23 inches high X 18 inches wide, this heavy cardboard restaurant menu from the 1940’s has never been used! This menu board was designed by the manufacturer to be a consumable, throw-away --- for jotting down the ever-changing, daily menu “Specials”!

Featuring a delightful, cartoon-like caricature of a black man, this board is in very good condition with minor edge wear, slight age-discoloration and a crease to the rim at the left end of the hat.

An interesting, seldom-found piece of Black Memorabilia!

Please disregard reflections in photos that are due to the presence of protective plastic wrap.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #1303163 (stock #BA938)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Offered is the fabulously RARE NIGGER HAIR Tobacco Tin produced from the late 1870's through the first half of the 1940's.

This particular tin retains its original, paper, US Internal Revenue tax stamp with an additional red ink imprint clearly dating this tin November 1941.

The image of an African woman with the racist title of “Nigger Hair” imposed over her shoulders was used by The American Tobacco Company of Wisconsin to promote its product; the lithographed tin was manufactured by the B. Leidersdorf Company, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Interestingly, it must be noted that after World War II, the product name "Nigger Hair" was changed to "Bigger Hair", although the exact same image of an African Woman continued to be used. The company simply added the words “Fiji Islander” to the left of her face in a very, very weak attempt to broaden the product’s appeal by moving further away from the earlier, severely derogatory moniker. At that time, the material out of which the tobacco container was constructed was changed from tin to heavy cardboard.

Measuring 7 inches high x 5 ¾ inches wide, the condition of the tin is a fabulous 9 out of 10--- sporting a lithograph on the front side with extremely teeny, minor, superficial scratches and rubs, and on the back side, tiny scratches along with tiny areas of paint loss (please see photos for condition). There is a very subtle crimp on the seam side of the tin at the base- difficult to see and impossible to photograph. The lid and the base of the tin show minor evidence of oxidation. The inside of the tin is clean with some minor oxidation evident. The tin is free of both rust and pitting.

The original orange color of the tin remains consistent over the entire tin although the color is a darker orange tone in actuality than what the camera “saw” when photographing it. Any imperfections are quite reasonable and expected given the age of this piece-- nearly 80 years of age!! This tin is just a wonderful example of early Black Americana advertising and looks so much better "in person" than what the camera was able to capture with its lens! Please note that any "white" areas in photos are flash or lighting reflections and are not imperfections to the tin.

The tin still retains its contents; it appears very little was consumed. The contents are quite antiquated and are no longer fit for human consumption and are presented for display purposes only. Additionally included is a grouping of discount tobacco coupons that were discovered inside the tin on top of the contents!

Truly an extraordinarily RARE piece of Black Memorabilia seldom found in this phenomenal condition complete with bail handle, lid and tax stamp! (Soft tissue paper has been wrapped around the bail handle to prevent any further scratching to the tin exterior.)

***For the ultimate collector of Nigger Hair Tobacco tins, an extraordinarily rare, 1949, Bigger Hair Tobacco container is also offered for sale- separately. The addition of the Bigger Hair Tobacco container will complete your collection from both a cultural and historical perspective! *** Type "tobacco" in our web cover page SEARCH box to locate it.

Both the Nigger Hair and the Bigger Hair Tobacco containers may be purchased together for the single price of $1195 with no further discounts applicable.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #334052 (stock #BA31)
Stonegate Antiques
$18.00
Measuring approximately 3 1/4 inches long x 2 1/4 inch wide x 1 1/8 inches deep, this vintage, sweetly depicted, steam-molded Brown Doll Face from the 1930’s has never been used! Eyes and lips are both hand-painted; condition is quite fine with no stains, tears, or discoloration—ready to be used!
All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #162986 (stock #BA327)
Stonegate Antiques
$195.00
An unusual piece, this delightful, cloth Mammy Broom Doll from the 1940's measures 12.5 inches high with a total height of 31 inches including the broom.

Mammy's wonderful, smiling face is hand-stitched and her clothes are machine sewn. Her blouse is seersucker, and her head, arms, skirt, apron, and cap are cotton. Her head, arms, and upper torso are stuffed with cotton batting. The natural bristle broom fills out both Mammy's torso and skirt & the wooden broom handle extends upward through her neck and head.

Mammy is in all original condition with no mends or repairs. The structural integrity of the broom remains quite sound, and Mammy, herself, is free of holes and tears. Her once-red skirt has now faded to pink. Her white cotton apron and cap have been cleaned removing nearly all traces of old stains, dirt, and dust. Photo number 2 shows her outfit BEFORE cleaning; all other photos reflect her appearance after cleaning.

A fabulous piece of vintage Black Americana, and a seldom seen form of the Black Mammy Doll!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #519513 (stock #BA578)
Stonegate Antiques
$245.00
Measuring 6 inches high, this darling, mint condition, Black Memorabilia, pudgy, Boy Child Nodder was made in 1950’s Japan by the Ardalt China Company. Dressed up as a little clown, his arms are bent upright at his sides as if he were in the middle of a trick! Such a darling piece!

The child’s head nods up and down in a "yes" motion by pivoting on a tiny metal bar inserted through his neck (see photos).

Condition is mint, and the piece is signed on the bottom of his right foot: “Hand Painted Lenwile China Ardalt Japan 6530 A”.

Black nodders are quite difficult to come by and have become an interesting sub-collecting category in the field of Black Americana! Not to be missed!

Please see the companion pieces also available (pictured here as well) - the Black Girl Child Nodder and the Bending Over Black Girl by Ardalt, Japan!!!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #1166268 (stock #BA835)
Stonegate Antiques
$375.00
Offered is a VERY difficult to find, Mammy or Aunt Jemima ceramic Clothes Sprinkler Bottle measuring 7" tall. My references indicate that she was made in Japan in the 1950's. She is in absolutely PERFECT CONDITION (no chips, cracks, breaks or repaint) and is complete with her original rubber and metal sprinkler stopper! Clearly, she was never actually filled with water and used to sprinkle water on wrinkled clothing prior to ironing!

Mammy or Aunt Jemima is wearing a white dress and head scarf with red trim. Her dark brown skin is flawless (any white spots or marks seen in photos are the result of light reflection and do not represent flaws of any kind.)

While she is unmarked, there is a very small black "X" on the bottom of the backside of her dress.

An incredibly hard to find piece! These very functional pieces were, more often than not, actually used in the home on ironing day, and thus were subject to damage or breakage and ended up in pieces at the local landfill! This wonderful Black American collectible was acquired from the original owner where it rested safely on a display shelf all these many years!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1303190 (stock #BA926, BA101)
Stonegate Antiques
$245.00
Offered are two, circa 1930's, Japan, colorfully decorated, Black Americana Tea Pots in pristine condition! A darling and diminutive, novelty elephant piece with riding black native completes the trio! All three elephants proudly point their trunks upward, awarding "Good Luck" (according to superstition) to anyone who displays them (or drinks their tea)!

Cleverly designed, the elephants themselves, serve as the body of each tea pot, while the turbaned Black Natives lift off the elephants' backs revealing their function as tea pot lids. A wicker handle facilitates handling on the two large tea pots. The base of all three pieces are marked "JAPAN".

The largest tea pot measures 7 inches high by 8 inches long; the middle-sized tea pot measures 6 inches high by 7 inches long; the tiny novelty piece measures a diminutive 3.25 inches long by 2.75 inches high.

Condition is excellent on all three pieces with the exception of the wicker handle on the middle-sized tea pot. One end of the handle is missing its looped section of the wicker that would have wrapped around the ceramic loop to secure the handle to the tea pot. As is noted in the photos, that end of the handle can be propped against the ceramic loop to maintain its proper appearance for display purposes.

Handsome and difficult-to-find pieces of vintage Black Memorabilia! All three Good Luck Elephant pieces are offered as a single group, priced at $245.00!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #674623 (stock #BA907)
Stonegate Antiques
$575.00
Measuring nearly 8 inches tall, this fabulous and rarely found, early, lithographed, tin toy, No. 1750, retaining its original box, was made by the Lindstrom Tool & Toy Company of Bridgeport, Connecticut.

This late 1930's toy is the later version of the two Mammy walker toys produced by this company. It is marked on back just under the white apron tie, "Lindstrom Corporation Made in USA". The marking is very faint, and thus, difficult to read without scrutiny. The contrast in this photo has been enhanced so that the manufacturer labeling is easier to visualize online.

Mammy shuffles along quite vigorously via her original wind-up mechanism while she holds her broom and quickly "sweeps" back and forth.

Over 70 years old, Mammy is still quite sturdy as she was well made, but she does show some minor scratching and paint loss from play over the years as the photos indicate. Her coloring remains brilliant!

The box remains in very good condition with minimal wear to seams considering its age. Coloring is strong. One flap at the top of the box is detached but present.

Sweeping Mammy is a must-have addition to any Black Memorabilia Toy collection!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1273763 (stock #BA922)
Stonegate Antiques
$345.00
Measuring 7.5 inches long x 10 inches high, this rarely-found, circa 1930's, wooden pull toy depicting a Smiling Black Boy is fully functional! He was manufactured by Wood Commodities Corporation, New York, and was called, not the typical Sambo as one might expect, but "Little Jasper"!

Little Jasper was created by George Pal, a cartoonist who worked for Paramount Studios and who created the Puppetoons, a popular cartoon series played in movie theaters of the era prior to the screening of the feature film.

Push or pull him along, and he twirls around while the two present wooden flowers spin along with him! (One wooden flower top is, unfortunately, missing--the only imperfection to this fabulous toy!)

Overall condition is rated as excellent, barely-used condition! There is very insignificant edge wear to paint here and there, but the four wheels don't show even the tiniest trace of wear from use, suggesting that this toy quite likely sat either in a display cabinet or was packed away for its entire existence! Even the original, paper manufacturing sticker remains intact and in pristine condition!

"Little Jasper" is very RARELY found, and the opportunity to acquire him should not be overlooked!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #479340 (stock #BA563)
Stonegate Antiques
$495.00
C1920s Cast Iron Hubley Black Mammy Soap Dish In fine form with very minimal paint loss as seen in photos, this wonderful circa 1920's, cast iron, Hubley BLACK MAMMY SOAP DISH is in all-original condition- no repaint!

Measuring 5 1/8 inches tall with soap dish attached, Mammy's colors- her deep red dress, mustard yellow shawl, and yellow and red polka dot head scarf- remain vibrant and brilliant with a wonderful old patina! Her face features large, dark eyes and a smiling, red mouth.

The soap dish is designed to be removed, and its anchoring cast iron peg fits into a hole atop Mammy's head. The exterior of the soap dish is cast to resemble a wicker laundry basket and is painted a slightly lighter-toned, mustard yellow.

A delightful, vintage piece of early Black Americana in premium condition!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1303175 (stock #BA925)
Stonegate Antiques
$1,950.00
Measuring 39.75 inches long x 17.50 inches high, this untouched, all-original, single-sided, porcelain, circa 1930-40s sign is an extraordinarily RARE piece of Black American history-- an artifact of the "Jim Crow" era when segregation of the African American race was unfortunately, most commonplace.

The origin of this sign is unknown, but given its very substantial size and weight, it likely once hung as a directional sign in a major bus or railroad station, designating the "WHITES ONLY" area where African-Americans were required to sit or stand.

The subtly convex sign has had no restoration and remains in all-original condition. It bears areas of paint loss, scratching and superficial rusting (some areas larger in scope than others) typical for its age and use as noted in photos. Please view photos for further assessment of the sign's condition. The age and use-related signs of wear do not impact the physical integrity of the sign and are more than appropriate to the age and purpose of the piece.

An utterly phenomenal, extremely RARE, one-of-a-kind, museum-worthy piece of Black American history!

Please take a moment to view the other "Jim Crow" Segregationist Era signs that I currently have the pleasure of offering.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #372139 (stock #BA469)
Stonegate Antiques
$125.00
With an overall brooch diameter of just 1 2/8 inches, photography of this diminutive piece was quite a challenge!

While mourning jewelry in general is not at all prolific on the antiques market today, coming upon a Mourning Brooch immortalizing a Black American is truly a RARE find!

This brass brooch is in fine original condition and celebrates the memory of a smiling black woman clutching a bouquet of flowers. This brooch is further enhanced with a delicate twisted braid around its circumference.

The photograph is gray/black toned and is in fine condition!

A truly RARE piece of Black Americana!