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All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1437139 (stock #BA951BA952)
Stonegate Antiques
$295.00
Measuring 9 inches high, these delightful examples of Folk Art styling, are two of a series of Black cloth character dolls made in Alabama in the 1930’s by unknown craftsmen/women.

It has been noted that their creation was encouraged through President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's Depression era program, the Work Projects Administration (WPA), in existence from 1935-1943. The WPA was designed to provide jobs across the country during the Great Depression. While most jobs were in construction and infrastructure, the most well-known project arm of the WPA, known as Federal Project Number One, employed musicians, artists, writers, actors and directors in arts, drama, media, and literacy projects. The five projects assigned to this consortium were: the Federal Writers’ Project (FWP), the Historical Records Survey (HRS), the Federal Theatre Project (FTP), the Federal Music Project (FMP), and the Federal Art Project (FAP). The creation of these dolls fell under the WPA Federal Art Project, with the goal of representing the various aspects of the culture, work and lives of the Southern black community of this time period.

The female doll offered is clad in a red and white checkered, machine-stitched dress topped over with a cream-colored linen apron which evidences some age-related, light soiling. Her apron pocket displays a red and white polka-dotted hankie with a bright, multi-colored head wrap protectively covering her graying hair from dust and grime while she completes household chores. Her outfit is fully completed with a cream-colored linen chemise and pantaloons and black leather shoes. Even though she is working at chores, brass-toned double hoop earrings beautifully grace her hand-stitched facial features. (All of the WPA black dolls produced for this project share identical hand-stitched facial features.) She holds her wicker-straw broom in her right hand but appears to have misplaced her tin pail for hauling swept up debris, which should be resting on her left arm.

Characteristic of this type of doll is a small square of asphalt shingle glued to the feet to serve as a stand. The doll's body is well-stuffed with cotton batting and rests sturdily on its stand, allowing the doll to freely stand upright. In light of the missing debris pail, she is priced at $245 vs $295 for her male, chicken-toting companion.

The gray-hair and bearded, chicken-toting black country gent doll is also attired in machine-stitched clothing and additionally shares a cotton-batting stuffed body, embroidered facial features, black leather shoes, and an asphalt shingle tile stand. He wears blue cotton britches with red suspenders along with a blue and cream striped cotton shirt and a red kerchief around his neck. His hat is constructed of black-colored felt. This country gent holds a very finely-crafted and detailed brown chicken under his right arm, while his left hand clutches a wooden walking stick. Note the lustrous chicken feathers protruding under his arm when he is viewed from the back.

Two very special dolls that represent a snapshot of history, capturing the lives of poor southern black folk of the Depression era.

As previously described, the female doll is priced at priced at $245.00 and her male companion at $295.00.

Please note: the male fisherman appearing in the photographs has been sold.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #520456 (stock #BA595)
Stonegate Antiques
$25.00
Measuring a very diminutive 2 inches long x 1 ½ inches wide x ½ inch deep, this tiny cardboard match box was made in Sweden in the 1930’s. It still retains its wonderful lithographed image of a Black Man carrying jugs of coconut juice among the palm trees. It is entitled “THE PALMTREE” and is additionally labeled “IMPREGNATED SAFETY MATCH, MADE IN SWEDEN” along the bottom of the litho. It is in near mint condition but no longer contains any matches! The box simply slides out of its cardboard casing with a push of the finger!
All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #861198 (stock #BA286)
Stonegate Antiques
$60.00
Offered are a group of ten, Black Memorabilia postcards in wonderful, unused condition of 1930's through 1950's vintage, priced at $60.00 for the group of ten.

While some photos may appear a bit blurry, this is a function of photography and not condition. All postcards are crisp and clear! The two comical cartoon postcards are much more brightly and vividly colored than the photos depict. The eight photo postcards also feature titles describing their subjects.

A delightful grouping that would be much-appreciated framed!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1417419 (stock #B288)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Offered is this 1927 copyright, LITTLE BLACK SAMBO published by Rand McNally Company, Chicago. Hardcover, 64 pages.

Little Black Sambo is the featured story in this book with the short stories, "The Gingerbread Man" and Titty Mouse and Tatty Mouse", added in as extras. While the illustrator in unnamed in the book's credits, all illustrations are executed by the same hand and are either initialed MEP" or signed "Margaret Evans Price".

A much-beloved children's classic written in the early 1900's by Englishwoman, Helen Bannerman, for her two daughters while they lived in India, Sambo, in the original tale, was an Indian boy and not an African-American child. He was soon converted to this race, however, by subsequent story tellers and illustrators. This age-old tale tells of Little Black Sambo and his frightening tiger encounter, which fortunately, has a happy ending!

The book exterior has seen much wear as evidenced in the photos, with significant wear to all edges, which amazingly, has had no effect on the sturdy structure of this book! The interior of the book remains in absolutely perfect condition, with an undamaged, very tight binding, and not an imperfection to be found-- no rips, stains, creases--only the inked inscription of the last name, "Meyere" on the upper right corner of the title page (see photos).

Illustrations are lovely and have that timeless yet nostalgic look of fine work produced in the Art Deco era!

Little Black Sambo books from this period are infrequently found!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #596309 (stock #BA641A)
Stonegate Antiques
$75.00
This is an authentic signed baseball from former Negro League baseball player Luther "Luke" Atkinson. The ball was signed at an autograph show in March 2006. Luther "Luke" Atkinson was #20, a stand-out performer for the Wilson, North Carolina All Stars, the Carolina Tigers, and the Satchel Paige All-Stars, who played baseball in the Negro Leagues from 1955 to 1960, starting his career right out of high school. As of spring 2018, Mr. Atkinson, who lives in Maryland, remains an active volunteer in the newly opened, Hubert V. Simmons Museum of Negro Leagues Baseball, Inc., at the new Owings Mills Metro Centre Complex.

A brief history of the Negro League:

African Americans first began to play baseball in the late 1800s on military teams, college teams, and company teams, eventually finding their way to the established professional baseball teams of white players. However, racism and “Jim Crow” laws would force African Americans from these teams by 1900, with black players left to form their own teams.

In 1920, an organized league structure was formed under the guidance of Andrew “Rube” Foster, a former player, manager, and owner for the Chicago American Giants. In a meeting held at the Paseo YMCA in Kansas City, Mo., Foster and several other Midwestern team owners joined to form the Negro National League. Soon, rival leagues formed in Eastern and Southern states, which brought black baseball to major urban centers and to rural countrysides in the U.S., Canada, and Latin America. The Leagues maintained a high level of professional skill and inspired economic development in many black communities.

In 1945, when Major League Baseball’s Brooklyn Dodgers recruited Jackie Robinson from the Kansas City Monarchs, Robinson became the first African American in the modern era to play on a Major League roster. While this historic event was a key moment in baseball and civil rights history, it marked the decline of the Negro Leagues. The best black players began to be recruited for the Major Leagues with their black fans following them, and the last Negro Leagues teams folded in the early 1960s.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1910 item #730279 (stock #BA686)
Stonegate Antiques
$28.00
Taken from a battered and unsalvageable 1907 story book, this delightful, hand-colored lithograph drawn by L. Hobbins is entitled, "Teaching Hannah Mariah To Skate".

Measuring 9 by 11 inches framed, this litho retains its vibrant colors!

A delightful piece which features the accompanying text on the reverse side.

The frame is a temporary and inexpensive one to allow the potential buyer to view the story on the backside, but the piece should be properly framed to enable its continued conservation once purchased.

Please ignore any white streaks seen in photos; these are the result of light reflection off of the glass.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #807814 (stock #BA840)
Stonegate Antiques
$395.00
Measuring 8 inches long x 4 1/2 inches wide x 4 inches high, this colorful, 1920's, tin lithographed, wind-up toy featuring a Black Native Riding a Turtle is quite visually appealing!!

In very nice condition with minor scratches to paint here and there as seen in photos, this wind-up toy works, but the mechanism does have the tendency to stick a little. Marked J. Chein.

A must-have for the avid Black Memorabilia Toy collector!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #794507 (stock #BA709)
Stonegate Antiques
$475.00
Offered are two utterly fabulous, one-of-a-kind, DOUBLE-SIDED, hand-painted signs that hung at Joe's "Colored Only" fish shack near Albany, Georgia, on the Flint River. These signs were created by the black folks who owned the shack which closed in the late 1950s, early 1960s. The folks had an area to eat in --serving pig ears and fish-- and also caught and cleaned fish.

These signs have a very colorful, folk-art appeal and certainly are utterly unique! They very much fit into the American, Southern "Outsider Art" collecting genre, a genre which highlights the work of self-taught, rural area artists who create fabulous and highly expressive art using the media and materials that they have at hand and which reflects the world that they know and live in.

The signs are quite heavy as each is made from a solid wood board. The signs are nearly identical in size and measure approximately 25 1/2 inches wide x 14 5/8 high x 3/4ths of an inch thick. One of the signs has very, very slight warping, but the warpage is not readily evident as seen by pictures. Each sign has 2 holes from which to hang them, and the old rusted hanging wire which is seen in the photos has been replaced by new hanging wire.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #365260 (stock #BA450)
Stonegate Antiques
$80.00
Measuring 8 3/4 inches long x 6 ½ inches wide, this very charming, circa 1920-1930’s key or pot holder hanger is entirely hand-made- and is a fabulous example of early American Folk Art!

Constructed of hand-cut, ¼ inch wide, black painted wood, this darling little black girl has hand-painted eyes and smiling lips, and is dressed in a hand and machine stitched, cloth-stuffed, one piece, black, tan and green dress! She has a hole in each ear, a metal hanging loop atop her head and one metal hook on each shoe for hanging keys or potholders!

She is in fine condition given her 70+ years of age and has great “patina”. Some minor paint loss, a few teeny holes in her outfit, but very visually appealing Black Americana Folk Art, none the less!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1216519 (stock #BA871)
Stonegate Antiques
$95.00
Measuring a diminutive 2.5 inches tall, this darling pair of Black Memorabilia, ceramic, boy and girl dolls remain in perfect, all-original condition. They remain housed in their original box complete with cardboard divider, and still retain the tiny ribbon bows tied on each of their six pigtails. Both the dolls and their box appear to have been safely tucked away unused and untouched in a drawer all of these years, the condition is that wonderful! The boy is incised "JAPAN" on the back of his white shirt while the girl's "JAPAN" marking appears on the back of her neck. The bottom of the box is stamped in ink, "237 2 PCS JAPAN". Not to be missed---- fabulous new-old stock!
All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1150519 (stock #BA827)
Stonegate Antiques
$125.00
Measuring 1 7/8 inches in diameter x 1/4 of an inch high, this seldom-found, circa 1920’s, dexterity game depicts a surprised or startled African baby. Likely German-made, the puzzle has no markings. It contains the 3 tiny metal balls, that with the proper manual dexterity, are to be placed in the baby’s mouth and two eyes. Two of the balls are currently fixed in place, likely due to the metal backing being very subtly pushed in.

Constructed of tin with tin back and a cardboard lithographed image and a glass cover, the puzzle is in all-original condition with some tiny crimps to the edges as noted in photos. (Please disregard any light or shiny spots in photos which are due to flash reflection off of the glass.)

An interesting image and a delightful piece of early Black Memorabilia!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1369646 (stock #BA929)
Stonegate Antiques
$395.00
In the mid-1800's, an unknown artist painted the face of a young Black boy in warm, soft colors, and unbeknown to the artist, forever immortalized the young boy's image! Since that time a variety of items were been produced in the image of the "Young Black boy with the Torn Hat" or "Johnny Griffin".

This piece is very much reminiscent of Johnny Griffin items with the exception of the intact, broad-rimmed hat on this piece versus the torn rim typically seen on all "named" Johnny Griffin pieces.

This circa 1920-30's novelty piece is constructed in solid brass, is hefty in weight, and was likely used as an ash tray given its tobacco leaf design/theme. The "Johnny Griffin-like" head of the young African-American boy that serves as the centerpiece of this wonderful piece, was molded separately and screwed into place. The screw is concealed under an original brass cap, done purely for esthetics.

The piece is in all original condition with the delightful, warm, rich, golden patina of old brass- not a reproduction- no replaced parts- and measures 7 inches long x 4 1/2 inches wide. It does not retain any markings, and country of origin is unknown, although likely of European origin.

A very seldom found Tobacciana piece of Black Memorabilia, that indeed pairs well with Johnny Griffin items!

To view all of the Johnny Griffin items currently available for sale, simply type “Johnny Griffin” into the search box on our web home page.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1222839 (stock #BA875)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Measuring 3 inches long x 2 inches wide, this vintage, 1930's, advertising, lithographed-metal, pocket mirror remains in all-original condition (see photos). This is not a reproduction!

Given away by the Merrick Thread Company as a free advertising premium to encourage the purchase of its product, this mirror depicts a rather confident black boy hanging from a single strand of Merrick thread while dangling above the open jaws of a hungry alligator! At the base of the mirror the caption reads, "Fooled Dis Time Cully Dis Cotton Aint Gwine To Break".

A delightful Black Americana Advertising piece!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1273760 (stock #BA920BA921)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Measuring 9 inches high, these delightful examples of Folk Art styling, are two of a series of Black cloth character dolls made in Alabama in the 1930’s by unknown craftsmen/women.

It has been noted that their creation was encouraged through President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's Depression era program, the Work Projects Administration (WPA), in existence from 1935-1943. The WPA was designed to provide jobs across the country during the Great Depression. While most jobs were in construction and infrastructure, the most well-known project arm of the WPA, known as Federal Project Number One, employed musicians, artists, writers, actors and directors in arts, drama, media, and literacy projects. The five projects assigned to this consortium were: the Federal Writers’ Project (FWP), the Historical Records Survey (HRS), the Federal Theatre Project (FTP), the Federal Music Project (FMP), and the Federal Art Project (FAP). The creation of these dolls fell under the WPA Federal Art Project, with the goal of representing the various aspects of the culture, work and lives of the Southern black community of this time period.

The doll clad in all black depicts the VERY rarely-found, black country preacher out for an afternoon stroll with his wooden walking stick in one hand and the Holy Bible clutched in the other. The preacher wears a machine-stitched suit thoughtfully detailed with fine, white shirt cuffs poking out from beneath his jacket and the white Reverend's collar at his neck. His left shoe reveals a hole with a sock-covered toe poking through! The preacher's stove-pipe-style hat is placed snugly on his head covering most of his gray hair although his full gray facial beard features prominently. His embroidered facial features, characteristic of these WPA dolls, are further accented with "steel-rimmed" style eye glasses. The 1.5 square inch bible actually has real pages! Also characteristic of this type of doll is a small square of asphalt shingle glued to the feet to serve as a stand. The doll's body is well-stuffed with cotton batting and he stands freely.

The gray-hair and bearded, chicken-toting black country gent doll is also attired in machine-stitched clothing and additionally shares a cotton-bating stuffed body, embroidered facial features, and an asphalt shingle tile stand. He wears cotton britches detailed with double knee patches and suspenders along with a blue and cream striped cotton shirt and a red and white polka dot kerchief around his neck. His hat is constructed of black-colored felt. This country gent holds a finely crafted and detailed brown chicken under his right arm, while his left hand clutches a wooden walking stick.

Two very special dolls that represent a snapshot of history, capturing the lives of poor Southern black folk of the Depression era.

The dolls are priced at $295.00 each.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #1416927 (stock #B287)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Offered is this 1959 copyright, LITTLE BLACK SAMBO TELL-A-TALE Book with illustrations by Violet LaMont. A Whitman Book publication, copyright by Western Publishing, Racine, Wisconsin. Hardcover, 28 pages.

A much-beloved children's classic written in the early 1900's by Englishwoman, Helen Bannerman, for her two young daughters while they lived in India, Sambo, in the original tale, was an Indian boy and not an African-American child. He was converted over time to this race, however, by subsequent story tellers and illustrators. This age-old tale tells of Little Black Sambo and his frightening tiger encounter, which fortunately, has a happy ending!

Condition is a 9.5 out of 10! This book has seen very little use with just a teeny bit of wear to book edge points. The front and back inside covers appear to have 2 tape mark-like, rectangular stains that occurred during manufacture and were not the result of anyone placing clear tape inside the book as this "stain" spans front and back at the binding seam.

Otherwise perfect!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #798462 (stock #BA711)
Stonegate Antiques
$195.00
Measuring 11.75 inches high x 8 inches wide, this striking 1950's, ceramic, Black African in a Sea Shell, hanging wall planter is marked on back "House of Venice California".

In lovely condition with age crackling to the backside of the seashell, this stunning piece appears to have never been used for its original purpose as a hanging wall planter. The black paint is in impeccable condition and any white dots that appear in photos are the result of light reflection off of teeny glaze imperfections and are NOT chips, rubs or scratches to the surface. The gold stippling to the seashell is perfect!

The piece has a hole in the back to facilitate wall-mounting or it may be easily displayed on a shelf.

A very seldom found piece of vintage Black Memorabilia that is truly stunning in appearance!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #611218 (stock #BA643B)
Stonegate Antiques
$625.00
A simply fabulous and extremely rare, circa 1870-1880's, solid brass, Black Americana SLAVE FACE BOWL!! A striking image!!

Prominent facial features- eyes and brows, nose, cheekbones, lips and teeth -and tight curly hair rise from the surface of the bowl. The bowl is rather heavy for its diminutive size and has no markings. Measures 4 inches in diameter and 1.5 inches high. Condition is excellent with some tarnishing that may be cleaned if desired; our preference was to offer this 140+ year old piece in as found condition.

An outstanding and highly collectible offering to add to one's advanced Black Memorabilia collection!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #336030 (stock #BA282)
Stonegate Antiques
$125.00
Measuring approximately 4 1/2 inches in length, this wonderful pair of hard plastic African Native dolls are dressed in highly detailed and decorated costumes. Circa 1940s, these all-original dolls with hand-painted faces are in very fine condition and make a striking pair when displayed!

The female is clothed in a green felt dress and head piece that are decorated with tiny blue and white beads. She wears double strand white beaded bracelets and anklets and also wears a double stranded white beaded necklace with a large red bead center. Underneath her dress in back a tiny head peeks out- a little plastic baby that she is carrying!

The male is clothed in a brown and red polka dotted skirt with 2 fur pouches, and a fur headdress. He is swathed in longer strings of beads that encircle his waist and also run diagonally across his chest. He, too, wears a double stranded beaded anklet and necklace. Larger Red beads hang from the sides of his dress as well as from the 2nd fur pouch that hangs behind him.

The arms and legs are movable at hip and shoulder joints of each doll. The Male has the following in raised lettering on his back: P. M. and J. H. B. The remainder of the marking is obscured by beading and clothing. No other markings are visible.

A visually striking pair!