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All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1472553 (stock #BA981)
Stonegate Antiques
$795.00
Measuring approximately 7.25 inches high, this difficult to find, Black Americana Vargas wax figure is mounted on its original wooden platform and is one of a series of fascinating "street character wax dolls" conceived of and crafted by Mrs. Concepcion Vargas Alfonso, daughter of the world-renowned, turn-of-the-20th century, New Orleans, Spanish sculptor, Francisco Vargas.

From approximately 1910 through the 1930's, Mrs. Concepcion Vargas-Alphonso, influenced by the great artistry of her famous father who also sculpted in wax, crafted a variety of wax dolls inspired by the black folk she saw on New Orleans's street corners selling their wares or practicing their trade - black folk performing everyday activities that would have been daily seen on the streets of the city.

While the majority of Vargas figures were sold exclusively through Harriet's, of 318 Rue Royal in the French Quarter of New Orleans, a small number of Vargas figures were also sold through Kate Latter's Candy Shop in New Orleans. The shop, opening during the Great Depression years, had significant financial difficulties and closed after only five years (1933-1938) in business. This particular Vargas figure was one that was sold there, and it retains a gold foil sticker advertising the shop underneath its wood base.

Vargas figures are completely hand-made, one-of-a-kind dolls that are seldom found on today's market due to their inherently fragile nature, making them highly sought after in the Black Memorabilia / Black Americana Collectible arena.

This figure, known as the Sugar Cane Seller, was recently de-accessioned from the Louisiana State University Rural Life Museum collection, Baton Rouge, LA, having been acquired by the museum from a private collector in January 1979.

The Sugar Cane Seller is one of the more difficult to find of the Vargas figures. In his right hand he holds three stalks of newly cut sugar cane, and in his left hand he holds a silver-colored, light-weight, metal machete.

Vargas wax figures are distinctly characterized by their interesting but highly exaggerated facial features. This gentleman Sugar Cane Seller wears a red and yellow checked kerchief around his neck, a green shirt with yellow polka dots, black and tan striped pants, and black "leather" shoes. His costume is entirely constructed of actual cloth fabric that was coated with a fine layer of clear wax to stiffen them. The Sugar Cane Seller's wax body is internally supported by a wire frame through which the figure is securely attached to the wooden base. Underneath the wood base is found the Kate Latter's Candy Store sticker as well as an inventory sticker from the LSU Rural Life Museum.

This wonderful figure is in fine condition for his 90+ years of age with the following minor restorations likely performed by the professionals at the LSU Rural Life Museum: a restored right hand (that is presently missing a thumb), and restoration to the back of the vendor's hat, noted by the lighter colored wax. The sugar cane stalks appear to have been reattached in place, and his left hand is also missing the thumb. Due to the fragility of the wax fingers, it is not uncommon to find them missing or partially present.

The Sugar Cane Seller's light-weight metal machete was once attached to the left hand. It is my opinion that this metal machete was fashioned by professionals at the museum to replace the original cardboard version. Its weight, however, appears to be too much for the wax hand to hold, and thus, it became unattached while still in the museum's collection. As seen in the photos, the machete can be successfully rested inside the hand provided it is placed so that it is balanced, with equal lengths of the machete in front of and behind the hand.

A true must-have, rarely-found piece for the ardent collector of New Orleans Black folk character figures!

Please take a moment to view the additional Vargas figures we currently have the pleasure of offering for sale. Type "Vargas" into the search box on our website homepage.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1472552 (stock #BA979)
Stonegate Antiques
$795.00
Measuring approximately 7 inches high, this wonderful Black Americana Vargas wax figure is mounted on its original wooden platform and is one of a series of fascinating "street character wax dolls" conceived of and crafted by Mrs. Concepcion Vargas Alfonso, daughter of the world-renowned, turn-of-the-20th century, New Orleans, Spanish sculptor, Francisco Vargas.

From approximately 1910 through the 1930's, Mrs. Concepcion Vargas-Alphonso, influenced by the great artistry of her famous father who also sculpted in wax, crafted a variety of wax dolls inspired by the black folk she saw on New Orleans's street corners selling their wares or practicing their trade - black folk performing everyday activities that would have been daily seen on the streets of the city.

Sold exclusively at the time through Harriet's, of 318 Rue Royal in the French Quarter of New Orleans, the completely hand-made, one-of-a-kind dolls are seldom found on today's market due to their inherently fragile nature, making them highly sought after in the Black Memorabilia / Black Americana Collectible arena.

This figure, known as the Banana Seller, was recently de-accessioned from the Louisiana State University Rural Life Museum collection, Baton Rouge, LA, having been acquired by the museum from a private collector in January 1979.

The Banana Seller was one of the more difficult to find of the Vargas figures. In his right hand he holds a very large cluster of bananas that are all still attached to a tree branch, and in his left hand he holds a silver-colored, light-weight, cardboard-constructed machete. A single banana rests at his feet having fallen off the cluster.

Vargas wax figures are distinctly characterized by their interesting but highly exaggerated facial features. This gentleman Banana Seller wears a red floral kerchief around his neck, a green flowered shirt, black and tan herringbone-patterned pants, and black "leather" shoes. His costume is entirely constructed of actual cloth fabric that was coated with a fine layer of clear wax to stiffen them. The Banana Seller's wax body is internally supported by a wire frame through which the figure is securely attached to the wooden base. Underneath the wood base is stamped the following: "Genuine VARGAS New Orleans LA".

Quite interestingly, the Banana Seller is without a hat. He wears his hair very predominantly parted on one side suggesting that his carefully styled hair was meant to be displayed, and that this particular figure was never created wearing a hat.

This wonderful figure is in amazing condition for his 90+ years of age with one minor restoration likely performed by the professionals at the LSU Rural Life Museum: a repaired right hand. He appears to have lost a little bit of his hair in the back (see photo).

A true must-have piece for the ardent collector of New Orleans Black folk character figures!

Please take a moment to view the additional Vargas figures we currently have the pleasure of offering for sale. Type "Vargas" into the search box on our website homepage.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1472550 (stock #BA978)
Stonegate Antiques
$850.00
Measuring approximately 7.25 inches high, this magnificent Black Americana Vargas wax figure is mounted on its original wooden platform and is one of a series of fascinating "street character wax dolls" conceived of and crafted by Mrs. Concepcion Vargas Alfonso, daughter of the world-renowned, turn-of-the-20th century, New Orleans, Spanish sculptor, Francisco Vargas.

From approximately 1910 through the 1930's, Mrs. Concepcion Vargas-Alphonso, influenced by the great artistry of her famous father who also sculpted in wax, crafted a variety of wax dolls inspired by the black folk she saw on New Orleans's street corners selling their wares or practicing their trade - black folk performing everyday activities that would have been daily seen on the streets of the city.

Sold exclusively at the time through Harriet's, of 318 Rue Royal in the French Quarter of New Orleans, the completely hand-made, one-of-a-kind dolls are seldom found on today's market due to their inherently fragile nature, making them highly sought after in the Black Memorabilia / Black Americana Collectible arena.

This figure, known as the Female Vegetable Seller Smoking a Pipe, was recently de-accessioned from the Louisiana State University Rural Life Museum collection, Baton Rouge, LA, having been acquired by the museum from a private collector in January 1979.

The Female Vegetable Seller Smoking a Pipe was one of the most popular of the renowned Vargas figures, highly sought after by visitors to the city of New Orleans. Her vegetables were hand-sculpted with exquisite detail and coloring, and her corncob pipe evens presents a red flame in the center of the pipe's bowl, adding to the superlative character authenticity of this Vargas street vendor.

Vargas wax figures are distinctly characterized by their interesting but highly exaggerated facial features. This gentlewoman Vegetable Seller wears a yellow floral kerchief around her neck, a red patterned bandanna on her head, a red, blue, and yellow plaid shirt and skirt, a blue floral-patterned apron around her waist, and black "leather" shoes. Her costume is entirely constructed of actual cloth fabric that was coated with a fine layer of clear wax to stiffen them. The Vegetable Seller's wax body is internally supported by a wire frame through which the figure is securely attached to the wooden base which, underneath, still retains its original "Harriet's" sticker.

This wonderful figure is in incredible condition for her 90+ years of age with, amazingly, only one minor restoration likely performed by the professionals at the LSU Rural Life Museum: a repaired carrot held in her right hand! It is a true rarity that the Vegetable Seller's corncob pipe and all fingers remain present given their highly delicate and fragile nature!

A true must-have piece for the ardent collector of New Orleans Black folk character figures!

Please take a moment to view the additional Vargas figures we currently have the pleasure of offering for sale. Type "Vargas" into the search box on our website homepage.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1472509 (stock #BA977)
Stonegate Antiques
$795.00
Measuring approximately 7.25 inches high, this very highly sought after Black Americana Vargas wax figure is mounted on its original wooden platform and is one of a series of fascinating "street character wax dolls" conceived of and crafted by Mrs. Concepcion Vargas Alfonso, daughter of the world-renowned, turn-of-the-20th century, New Orleans, Spanish sculptor, Francisco Vargas.

From approximately 1910 through the 1930's, Mrs. Concepcion Vargas-Alphonso, influenced by the great artistry of her famous father who also sculpted in wax, crafted a variety of wax dolls inspired by the black folk she saw on New Orleans's street corners selling their wares or practicing their trade - black folk performing everyday activities that would have been daily seen on the streets of the city.

Sold exclusively at the time through Harriet's, of 318 Rue Royal in the French Quarter of New Orleans, the completely hand-made, one-of-a-kind dolls are seldom found on today's market due to their inherently fragile nature, making them highly sought after in the Black Memorabilia / Black Americana Collectible arena.

This figure, known as the Spanish Moss Seller with Alligator, was recently de-accessioned from the Louisiana State University Rural Life Museum collection, Baton Rouge, LA, having been acquired by the museum from a private collector in January 1979.

The Spanish Moss Seller with Alligator was one of the most popular of the renowned Vargas figures, highly sought after by visitors to the city of New Orleans. On his back he balances a very large bale of Spanish moss, while holding tight to a rope that is connected to a very young alligator perched at his feet.

Vargas wax figures are distinctly characterized by their interesting but highly exaggerated facial features. This gentleman Spanish Moss Seller with Alligator wears a red floral kerchief around his neck, a yellow straw hat on his head, a green flowered shirt, tan striped pants, and black "leather" shoes. His costume is entirely constructed of actual cloth fabric that was coated with a fine layer of clear wax to stiffen them. The Spanish Moss Seller's wax body is internally supported by a wire frame through which the figure is securely attached to the wooden base.

This wonderful figure is in amazing condition for his 90+ years of age with three minor restorations likely performed by the professionals at the LSU Rural Life Museum: a repaired right hand, and two re-attached feet on the alligator.

A true must-have piece for the ardent collector of New Orleans Black folk character figures!

Please take a moment to view the additional Vargas figures we currently have the pleasure of offering for sale. Type "Vargas" into the search box on our website homepage.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1472505 (stock #BA976)
Stonegate Antiques
$795.00
Measuring approximately 7 inches high, this highly sought after Black Americana Vargas wax figure is mounted on its original wooden platform and is one of a series of fascinating "street character wax dolls" conceived of and crafted by Mrs. Concepcion Vargas Alfonso, daughter of the world-renowned, turn-of-the-20th century, New Orleans, Spanish sculptor, Francisco Vargas.

From approximately 1910 through the 1930's, Mrs. Concepcion Vargas-Alphonso, influenced by the great artistry of her father who also famously sculpted in wax, crafted a variety of wax dolls inspired by the black folk she saw on New Orleans's street corners selling their wares or practicing their trade - black folk performing everyday activities that would have been daily seen on the streets of the city.

Sold exclusively at the time through Harriet's, of 318 Rue Royal in the French Quarter of New Orleans, the completely hand-made, one-of-a-kind dolls are seldom found on today's market due to their inherently fragile nature, making them highly sought after in the Black Memorabilia / Black Americana Collectible arena.

This figure, known as the Cotton Seller, was recently de-accessioned from the Louisiana State University Rural Life Museum collection, Baton Rouge, LA, having been acquired by the museum from a private collector in January 1979.

This female Cotton Seller is a bit unusual as she has a simple, red-patterned cloth draped over her head, neck, and shoulders to protect from the sun, instead of the more typically-found bandanna worn by the majority of female street vendors. She holds a wax "wicker" basket in her right arm that is brimming with freshly-picked cotton, and at her feet, her left hand balances a large burlap bag containing much, much more cotton.

Vargas wax figures are distinctly characterized by their interesting but highly exaggerated facial features. This gentlewoman Cotton Seller wears a red floral kerchief around her neck, a green patterned shirt, and a delightful yellow skirt patterned all over with clusters of hearts, which nearly conceals her black "leather" shoes. Her costume is entirely constructed of actual cloth fabric that was coated with a fine layer of clear wax to stiffen them. The Cotton Seller's wax body is internally supported by a wire frame through which the figure is securely attached to the wooden base.

This wonderful figure is in absolutely amazing condition for her 90+ years of age with only one imperfection: a missing index finger on her left hand- a common condition occurring due to the extreme delicacy and fragility of the wax.

Please take a moment to view the additional Vargas figures we currently have the pleasure of offering for sale. Type "Vargas" into the search box on our website homepage.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1472487 (stock #BA975)
Stonegate Antiques
$795.00
Measuring approximately 7 inches high, this highly sought after Black Americana Vargas wax figure is mounted on its original wooden platform and is one of a series of fascinating "street character wax dolls" conceived of and crafted by Mrs. Concepcion Vargas Alfonso, daughter of the world-renowned, turn-of-the-20th century, New Orleans, Spanish sculptor, Francisco Vargas.

From approximately 1910 through the 1930's, Mrs. Concepcion Vargas-Alphonso, influenced by the great artistry of her father who also famously sculpted in wax, crafted a variety of wax dolls inspired by the black folk she saw on New Orleans's street corners selling their wares or practicing their trade - black folk performing everyday activities that would have been daily seen on the streets of the city.

Sold exclusively at the time through Harriet's, of 318 Rue Royal in the French Quarter of New Orleans, the completely hand-made, one-of-a-kind dolls are seldom found on today's market due to their inherently fragile nature, making them highly sought after in the Black Memorabilia / Black Americana Collectible arena.

This figure, known as the Praline Seller, was recently de-accessioned from the Louisiana State University Rural Life Museum collection, Baton Rouge, LA, having been acquired by the museum from a private collector in January 1979.

The Praline Seller was one of the most popular of the renowned Vargas figures, highly sought after by visitors to the city of New Orleans. She holds a wicker basket in her right arm that contains five incredibly realistic praline cakes, and tucked under her left arm is a paper "fan" used to ward off any flies from landing upon her delicious pralines.

Vargas wax figures are distinctly characterized by their interesting but highly exaggerated facial features. This gentlewoman Praline Seller wears a yellow floral kerchief around her neck, a red, yellow and blue bandanna on her head, a red and yellow plaid shirt, an ecru linen waist apron, and a delightful yellow skirt patterned all over with whimsical bunny rabbits, which nearly conceals her black "leather" shoes. Her costume is entirely constructed of actual cloth fabric that was coated with a fine layer of clear wax to stiffen them.

The Praline Seller's wax body is internally supported by a wire frame through which the figure is securely attached to the wooden base. The bottom of the base has the word "Praline" scripted on it.

This wonderful figure is in amazing condition for her 90+ years of age with one imperfection: a missing thumb on her left hand- a common condition occurring due to the extreme delicacy and fragility of the wax. At very close inspection, it appears that her right forearm may have been professionally repaired some many years ago, likely by professional staff at the museum.

A true must-have piece for the ardent collector of New Orleans Black folk character figures!

Please take a moment to view the additional Vargas figures we currently have the pleasure of offering for sale. Type "Vargas" into the search box on our website homepage.

All Items : Vintage Arts : Instruments and Implements : Medical : Apothecary : Pre 1900 item #1470097 (stock #J1336)
Stonegate Antiques
$95.00
Offered for sale is a scarce early 19th century, medium-sized, apothecary pharmacy bottle sporting “Tr. SERPENT.” on the label under glass label!

The 8.5 inch tall bottle sports a pontil on the base, and is of early blown glass construction. The fancy, applied label is complete, shows mild age related stains and wear and is in good condition.

The photo demonstrates an unobtrusive crack above the letters 'SER' on the gold label. The perfect fitting stopper is of ground glass construction and is in very good order as well.

The inside of the bottle notes slight staining and could be cleaned if desired.

Very nice indeed!

.......SOME HISTORY.......

This small shrub, native to the Orient from India to Sumatra, has for centuries been used in Indian medicine. In 1952 reserpine, one of several alkaloids in the plant, was isolated from its root and has since been evaluated in western medicine as one of the most valuable druǵs for treatinǵ hiǵh blood pressure.

 R serpentina was used in folk medicine in India for centuries to treat a wide variety of maladies, including snake and insect bites, febrile conditions, malaria, abdominal pain, and dysentery. It was also used as a uterine stimulant, febrifuge, and cure for insanity. The plant was mentioned in Indian manuscripts as long ago as 1000 bc.

Rauwolfia has been studied for the treatment of mental diseases, including schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, epilepsy and seizures, and of insomnia and sleep problems.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1837 VR item #1469991 (stock #BA974)
Stonegate Antiques
$1,995.00
These authentic and extraordinarily RARE, hand-forged, wrought iron, Slave Ship Ankle Shackles were de-accessioned from a private collection. Ankle shackles such as these were used to restrain and imprison kidnapped Africans below decks in the slaver ships' holds during what is known as the ‘Middle Passage’, the brutal voyage endured by captured Africans from the West Coast of Africa to enslavement in the Americas- the second portion of what was known as the transatlantic slave trade.

While the precise age of this late 18th to early 19th century old shackle is unknown, this type of ankle shackle has been documented to have been in use as far back as the 1780's by English slave traders, and was likely in continued use up until the 1860 onset of America's Civil War. In 2015, the International Slavery Museum in Liverpool, England, acquired a set of ankle shackles identical to the set offered here. In referring to the museum's acquisition, the museum's Head, Dr Richard Benjamin, stated the following:

“A similar pair of shackles was purchased in Liverpool by the campaigner Thomas Clarkson as evidence against the transatlantic slave trade. They were presented in front of Privy Council in 1788 as part of its enquiry into the transatlantic slave trade. An engraving of the shackles with a detailed description also appeared in Clarkson’s antislavery pamphlet."

These hand-forged, wrought iron ankle shackles remain in all-original and untouched condition, measuring approximately 11.75 inches in length. The cuff sizes vary slightly ranging from approximate lengths of 3.75 to 4 inches and approximate widths from 2.75 to 3 inches, a set likely used on a female slave. The shackles can be described as consisting of a wrought iron bolt with a pair of loops slid onto it via holes in both ends of each loop. One end of the iron bar is fixed closed by a triangular-shaped flange large enough to prevent the loops from being removed from the bar. The other end of the bar ends in a circular "eye" that is secured closed by a hand-wrought circular "lock washer" inserted at the time the shackles were applied.

An utterly gruesome, tangible testament to the malevolence and horrors of slavery and the transatlantic slave trade.

All Items : Vintage Arts : Decorative Art : Folk Art : Pre 1950 item #1467965 (stock #G709)
Stonegate Antiques
$545.00
Offered is a hard to find, hand-carved and hand-painted, ice fishing decoy from the 1940-1950 era.

This wonderful folk art decoy was recently acquired from the collection of an 81 year old Kansas collector who stated that the decoy originated in Montana.

This sweet folk art beauty has been skillfully crafted and painted to closely reflect the real thing! In fact, this charmer has signs of having been a working decoy (but not that frequently) as evidenced by the light areas of superficial rust on the tin fins and where the fishing line connects and to the metal eyes.

There is faint paint loss and light wear giving this work of art a wonderful vintage patina. One weight on the underside are present giving this decoy a bit of heft. Measures 9 inches long x 2.5 inches wide x 2 inches high including the dorsal fin. Maker is unknown.

A splendid work of folk art! Please take a moment to view our other fish decoys offered for sale by typing "decoy" into our homepage SEARCH box or by clicking on the "American Folk Art" specialty category on our homepage.

All Items : Vintage Arts : Decorative Art : Folk Art : Pre 1950 item #1467827 (stock #G708)
Stonegate Antiques
$425.00
Offered is a hard to find, vintage, hand-carved and hand-painted, ice fishing, fish decoy from the 1940-1950 era.

This wonderful folk art decoy was recently acquired from the collection of an 81 year old Kansas collector who stated that the decoy originated in Montana.

A delightful and colorful folk art beauty, this decoy has been skillfully crafted and painted to closely reflect an actual fish.

In addition, this charmer has evidence of having been a working decoy as noted by the mild areas of surface rust on the tin fins and where the fishing line connects. There is light loss of paint and wear giving this work of art a wonderful vintage patina. Present are two weights on the underside of the decoy providing a bit of heft. Measures 7.5 inches long x 2.75 inches wide x 2.25 inches high including the fins. Maker is unknown.

A splendid work of folk art!

Please take a moment to view our other fish decoys offered for sale by typing "decoy" into our homepage SEARCH box or by clicking on the "American Folk Art" specialty category on our homepage.

All Items : Vintage Arts : Decorative Art : Folk Art : Pre 1950 item #1467826 (stock #G706)
Stonegate Antiques
$525.00
Offered is a hard to find, vintage hand-carved and hand-painted, ice fishing fish decoy from the 1940-1950 era.

This wonderful folk art decoy was recently acquired from the collection of an 81 year old Kansas collector who stated that the decoy originated in Montana.

This delightful and visually appealing folk art beauty has been skillfully crafted and painted with lifelike details to closely reflect a real fish. In fact, this charmer has evidence of having been a working decoy as noted by the mild areas of surface rust on the tin fins and where the fishing line connects.

A loss of paint and light wear gives this work of art a wonderful vintage patina, and one large weight on the bottom provides a bit of heft. Measures 9.0 inches long x 2.0 inches wide x 2.0 inches high including the dorsal fin. Maker is unknown.

A splendid work of folk art!

Please take a moment to view our other fish decoys offered for sale by typing "decoy" into our homepage SEARCH box or by clicking on the "American Folk Art" specialty category on our homepage.

All Items : Vintage Arts : Decorative Art : Folk Art : Pre 1950 item #1467784 (stock #G705)
Stonegate Antiques
$625.00
Offered is a hard to find, hand-carved and hand-painted, ice fishing decoy from the 1940-1950 era.

This wonderful folk art decoy was recently acquired from the collection of an 81 year old Kansas collector who stated that the decoy originated in Montana.

This sweet folk art beauty has been skillfully crafted and painted to closely reflect the real thing! In fact, this charmer has signs of having been a working decoy (but not that frequently) as evidenced by the light areas of superficial rust on the tin fins and where the fishing line connects and to the metal eyes.

There is faint paint loss and light wear giving this work of art a wonderful vintage patina. Two weights on the underside are present giving this decoy a bit of heft. Measures 7 inches long x 2.5 inches wide x 2 inches high including the dorsal fin. Maker is unknown.

A splendid work of folk art!

Please take a moment to view our other fish decoys offered for sale by typing "decoy" into our homepage SEARCH box or by clicking on the "American Folk Art" specialty category on our homepage.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1970 item #1467304 (stock #BA973)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Purchased approximately ten years ago from the Estate Sale at the Greenwich, Connecticut, home of the very prominent, American, CBS Television Personality, GAYLE KING, this nostalgic watercolor, reminiscent of times past, features a young black girl attentively and carefully canning strawberries in the kitchen.

This unsigned and undated piece of art was executed with very soft lines whereby no edge seems sharp- not the counter edge, or the lids of the jars, or the heavy black iron grates of the gas stove. Painted in predominantly darkened hues of blues, silvery-whites and grays, pops of red appear in the freshly canned strawberries and hints of yellow emerge in the window curtain and in earthenware bowl that the young girl works out of, all culminating in the creation of an ethereal effect of calm and serenity.

This lovely piece is generous in size with the visual dimensions of the actual watercolor measuring 15" in height x 26.75" in length. The watercolor is double-matted with an 1/8" wide interior mat in a neutral earth-tone surrounded by a cream-colored, 2 3/4" wide mat that is further complemented with an etched, earth-tone, single line simulating the demarcations of a false third mat- very clever! (see photos) The extraordinarily sturdy, warm-toned, hardwood frame measures 1 3/4" wide with the total framed measurement of this piece approximately 25" in height x 36" wide. The backside of the frame features an Estate Sale, stringed-tag stating the provenance of this piece: "From the Greenwich CT home of Gayle King".

It must be noted that all photographs were taken through the glass of this framed piece, so multiple photographic angles are provided in the attempt to reduce distortion in the photos from light reflection off the glass. Please ignore any variations in color or shading - all are strictly the result of unavoidable light reflection.

Please also note that because this item would be classified as oversized by delivery carriers due to its weight (approx 11 lbs) and its length and width measurements, this item does not qualify for free shipping.

All Items : Vintage Arts : Decorative Art : Folk Art : Pre 1950 item #1467261 (stock #G707)
Stonegate Antiques
$825.00
Offered is a very difficult to find, hand-carved and hand-painted, ice fishing FISH DECOY from the 1940s era.

This wonderful folk art decoy was recently acquired from the collection of an 81 year old Kansas collector who stated that the decoy originated in Montana.

Expertly carved and painted to simulate an actual Perch fish, this beauty quite closely reflects the real thing!

In fact, this charmer has some subtle signs of having once been an actual working decoy as evidenced by the light areas of superficial rust on the tin fins and at the junction where the fishing line connects to the eyelet in front of the dorsal fin. Clearly, given this decoy's incredible condition and its 80+ age, it did not see much use below the waterline!

There is faint loss of paint and light wear giving this a work of art a wonderful vintage patina. Two weights are present on the underside of Mr. Perch. Measures 9 inches long x 3 inches wide x 2.5 inches high including the fins. Maker unknown.

An utterly splendid work of folk art!

Please take a moment to view our other fish decoys offered for sale by typing "decoy" into our homepage SEARCH box or by clicking on the "American Folk Art" specialty category on our homepage.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Nostalgia : Fashion : Posters : Pre 1900 item #1467163 (stock #G711)
Stonegate Antiques
$225.00
Professionally framed in 1989 with museum-quality, acid-free backing as well as acid-free double-matting, this fabulous 1863, double fashion print from Godey's Lady's Book Magazine depicts the high style of the upper echelons of ladies' fashions during the Abraham Lincoln presidency, 159 years ago!

These fashion prints were carefully folded by Godey's to preserve the image and then were typically placed at the front of the magazine. The prints were reproduced from an actual, intricately detailed engraving which was then hand-tinted. Accompanying these fashion prints (or fashion plates as they were often referred to during this time period) were very detailed descriptions about each garment featured as well as the occasions in which a lady would appropriately wear each one.

This Godey's fashion offering features two prints detailing a total of 10 ladies and one young girl in the highest fashions of the day!

In the left side print, three different ladies model the latest in outerwear cover garments, while a fourth young woman is dressed ethereally in oyster white linen and lace. She looks on over the shoulder of a fifth woman dressed in creamy satin who quite expertly paints the portrait of a young girl. A little dog patiently waits! As an artist myself, I have always been especially fond of this Godey print!

The right side print features 5 young women dressed in exquisitely designed satin gowns adorned with lace and hand-embroidery straight from the fashion books of Paris! One of the ladies still models a brilliant ruby outer wear garment, having just arrived to the party that we see in the distance on the right side of the print beyond the heavily brocaded drapery entrance.

The hairstyles and the head-dresses in all Godey's fashion prints were also deliberately depicted so that one's "complete appearance" reflected the latest fashions from Europe, most particularly, France.

Both "fashion plate" prints are in wonderful condition with no concerns noted. Fold lines original to the prints' placement in the magazine are present as is expected as folding these fabulous prints within the magazine was viewed as a mechanism of protection while being transported through the postal system. The fashion plates were expected to be removed and used to either recreate one's own costume, or to add to one's visual collection of current fashion in a memory book or diary.

The prints are double matted in oyster white and a very neutral earth tone- colors that compliment the shadowing in the prints as well as the multiple shades of color worn by the featured ladies.

Measuring approximately 12.75" high x 28.25" wide, this highly decorative wood frame is antiqued-gold-toned and is in mint condition. PLEASE NOTE THAT ALL PHOTOS WERE TAKEN THROUGH THE GLASS which accounts for any and all bizarre reflections and/or aberrations in tone or color that might appear in photos. This stunning piece is perfect!

A bit of history: Godey's Lady's Book or Magazine was an American women's magazine that was published from 1830 to 1878 in Philadelphia. It not only featured fashions of the time, but short stories, poetry, directions and patterns for sewing garments at home as well as piano sheet music. Even though the yearly subscription of $3 was quite expensive for the time, the magazine was extraordinarily popular - the most popular monthly journal of its time, with subscribers at its peak reaching 150,000.

Please note that because this item would be classified as oversize (the length) by delivery carriers, this item does not qualify for free shipping.

Type "Godey's" into the SEARCH bar on our homepage to locate the other Godey's Fashion print we have available for sale.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Nostalgia : Fashion : Posters : Pre 1900 item #1467042 (stock #G710)
Stonegate Antiques
$145.00
Professionally framed in 1992 with museum-quality, acid-free backing as well as acid-free double-mats, this fabulous 1863, fashion print from Godey's Lady's Book Magazine depicts the high style of the upper echelons of ladies' fashions during the Abraham Lincoln presidency, 159 years ago!

These fashion prints were typically placed at the front of the magazine, carefully folded to protect them from damage. They were reproduced from an actual, highly-detailed engraving which was then hand-tinted. Accompanying these fashion prints (or fashion plates as they were often referred to as) were very detailed descriptions about the garments featured as well as the occasions in which they could be appropriately worn.

This Godey's print features 5 ladies who have gathered together for tea and cakes while a young girl attempts to play with her dog who is distracted by the cake one lady holds in her hand!

This "fashion plate" print is in wonderful condition with just a single, teeny circular age-related early stain in the extreme lower left corner. Fold lines original to the print's placement in the magazine are noted. The print is double matted in gray and a very pale mauve- colors that reflect the shadowing in the print as well as the shades worn by both the little girl playing with her dog as well as the lady second from the right who wears the most intricately ornate gown featured!

Measuring 12.75" long x 14.75" wide, this highly decorative wood frame is silver toned with subtle hints of gold and is in mint condition.

PLEASE NOTE THAT ALL PHOTOS WERE TAKEN THROUGH THE GLASS which accounts for any and all bizarre reflections and/or aberrations in tone or color that might appear in photos.

A bit of history: Godey's Lady's Book or Magazine was an American women's magazine that was published from 1830 to 1878 in Philadelphia. It not only featured fashions of the time, but short stories, poetry, directions and patterns for sewing garments at home as well as piano sheet music. Even though the yearly subscription of $3 was quite expensive for the time, the magazine was extraordinarily popular - the most popular monthly journal of its time, with subscribers at its peak reaching 150,000.

Please see the other framed Godey's print we are offering featuring two different fashion plates! Simply type "Godey's" into the search bar.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1910 item #1466758 (stock #B311)
Stonegate Antiques
$175.00
Written by the author of "The Story of Little Black Sambo", Englishwoman, Helen Bannerman's publication of "The Story of Little Black Mingo" followed shortly thereafter, this time, featuring a brave and ingenuous female heroine. Little Mingo, with the help of a friendly mongoose, manages to outsmart both her guardian, an evil old woman who cares nothing for her, and a voracious alligator plotting to devour her! The story ends with Mingo and the mongoose living happily ever after in a nice little house by the riverside.

Helen Bannerman was inspired to write these stories for her two young daughters while the family lived in India; Mingo and Sambo were Indian children and not African-American. They were converted over time to this race, however, by subsequent story tellers and illustrators.

A mini book measuring 4" x 5.75", this cloth-bound hardcover was published by Frederick A. Stokes Company, New York, with 64 pages of vividly colored illustrations, and no copyright date. Research indicates this version was published circa 1902.

Condition is a 9 out of 10! This 120+ year old book has seen little use with just a teeny bit of wear to book edge points and age-related staining with some minor paper loss to the original, overlay-ed paper cover. Some soiling to interior pages here and there, but otherwise, intact and tight with no tears, creases, pen/pencil markings! Amazing condition for a book of this age!

A simply wonderful story, truly a fairy tale of sorts, that is seldom found in this lovely, original, early edition! To see the Little Black Sambo items currently available for sale, simply type “Sambo” into the search box on our website homepage.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1910 item #1466756 (stock #B310)
Stonegate Antiques
$65.00
Entitled "A Little Colored Boy and Other Stories, this extremely scarce, small folio book was the property of Reverend J. H. Jackson, pastor of the Greenburg, Indiana, A.M.E. (African Methodist Episcopalian) Church.

The book contains lovely black ink line drawings and etchings which accompany a great variety of wonderful short stories for children designed to teach strong moral values, attitudes and behaviors. The story, A Little Colored Boy, is the first and the longest tale in the book. Undoubtedly, Reverend Jackson often used this book in teaching the congregation's children their Sunday school lessons.

The book is inscribed in faded blue ink inside the front cover as follows: "Rev. J. H. Jackson Book. Pastor Greenburg Indiana's A.M.E Church".

Published by the Abingdon Press of Cincinnati and New York, the book contains no publishing date. However, it was likely published in the late 1890's as one story references President Grover Cleveland's eldest child who was born in 1891: "Little Ruth Cleveland, when she was the baby of the White House,..."

President Cleveland served two separate presidential terms of four years each from 1885-1889 and again from 1893- 1897. It is highly likely that this book was published during Cleveland's 2nd term of office or shortly thereafter when the populace would have been well familiar with "Little Ruth", who was popularly known as "Baby Ruth".

The book measures 4.5"x 6.5" and contains over 30 little stories within its 64 pages. Hardcover, the book is in amazing condition for its age, an 8 out of 10. The cloth-bound cover has minimal wear with only one 1/4' long split on the rear binding and some staining certainly commensurate with its 120+ years of age. The binding and pages are tight. Some minor, age-related staining here and there throughout the book, with one page noted as having a tiny tear at its top.

A highly unusual find!