Black Memorabilia Drug Store Pharmacy Medical Apothecary Stonegate Antiques Stonegate Antiques
We ALWAYS offer FREE USPS STANDARD shipping to the 48 contiguous United States on items priced $100 or greater! Please note: Over-sized/heavy items either require special freight shipping or will incur additional carrier shipping costs and are exempt from free shipping offer.
Sort By:
All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1437176 (stock #BA953)
Stonegate Antiques
$1,275.00
Measuring 26.5" long x 13.75" wide, this fabulous, one-of-a-kind segregation sign is felt to be circa 1930s.

The sign with its flat black background, features a decorative free-hand, skill-fully executed, corner-looped edge design in old white paint advertising: SLEEPING ROOM FOR RENT.

Beneath the words 'FOR RENT', the words "WHITE ONLY" have been covered over with a layer of similar-colored background paint. Both words are still visible beneath this layer of paint with the word "WHITE" being most readily visualized.

I believe that this "paint-over" can be easily, professionally removed, and I toyed with the idea of having this done, but then felt that I should offer the sign as it is in its current state, as it is reflective of a small yet positive progression in history, in the viewpoint of at least this proprietor in our society in this time period. What prompted this change of viewpoint, which obviously occurred decades before the Civil Rights Act of 1964, is forever lost to history. The place of origin of this sign is unknown.

The sign is hand-painted on Masonite, a smooth-faced, compressed wood hardboard that was invented in the 1920s and was in popular use during the Depression-ridden 1930s due to its relatively inexpensive price tag. The sign has nine holes to facilitate hanging: three on each end and three down the center of the sign. The sign retains an original surface patina with age-related crackling to the lettering. In addition to the words "White Only" being painted over, a decorative flourish centered between the words "Sleeping Room" and "For Rent" has also been painted over, reason unknown. Mild surface paint loss, scuff-marks, and edge wear are present, commensurate with a 90+year old sign.

An exquisite example of Segregation Era signage that tells a story of prejudice evolving to an acceptance of equality.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1437139 (stock #BA951BA952)
Stonegate Antiques
$295.00
Measuring 9 inches high, these delightful examples of Folk Art styling, are two of a series of Black cloth character dolls made in Alabama in the 1930’s by unknown craftsmen/women.

It has been noted that their creation was encouraged through President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's Depression era program, the Work Projects Administration (WPA), in existence from 1935-1943. The WPA was designed to provide jobs across the country during the Great Depression. While most jobs were in construction and infrastructure, the most well-known project arm of the WPA, known as Federal Project Number One, employed musicians, artists, writers, actors and directors in arts, drama, media, and literacy projects. The five projects assigned to this consortium were: the Federal Writers’ Project (FWP), the Historical Records Survey (HRS), the Federal Theatre Project (FTP), the Federal Music Project (FMP), and the Federal Art Project (FAP). The creation of these dolls fell under the WPA Federal Art Project, with the goal of representing the various aspects of the culture, work and lives of the Southern black community of this time period.

The female doll offered is clad in a red and white checkered, machine-stitched dress topped over with a cream-colored linen apron which evidences some age-related, light soiling. Her apron pocket displays a red and white polka-dotted hankie with a bright, multi-colored head wrap protectively covering her graying hair from dust and grime while she completes household chores. Her outfit is fully completed with a cream-colored linen chemise and pantaloons and black leather shoes. Even though she is working at chores, brass-toned double hoop earrings beautifully grace her hand-stitched facial features. (All of the WPA black dolls produced for this project share identical hand-stitched facial features.) She holds her wicker-straw broom in her right hand but appears to have misplaced her tin pail for hauling swept up debris, which should be resting on her left arm.

Characteristic of this type of doll is a small square of asphalt shingle glued to the feet to serve as a stand. The doll's body is well-stuffed with cotton batting and rests sturdily on its stand, allowing the doll to freely stand upright. In light of the missing debris pail, she is priced at $245 vs $295 for her male, chicken-toting companion.

The gray-hair and bearded, chicken-toting black country gent doll is also attired in machine-stitched clothing and additionally shares a cotton-batting stuffed body, embroidered facial features, black leather shoes, and an asphalt shingle tile stand. He wears blue cotton britches with red suspenders along with a blue and cream striped cotton shirt and a red kerchief around his neck. His hat is constructed of black-colored felt. This country gent holds a very finely-crafted and detailed brown chicken under his right arm, while his left hand clutches a wooden walking stick. Note the lustrous chicken feathers protruding under his arm when he is viewed from the back.

Two very special dolls that represent a snapshot of history, capturing the lives of poor southern black folk of the Depression era.

As previously described, the female doll is priced at priced at $245.00 and her male companion at $295.00.

Please note: the male fisherman appearing in the photographs has been sold.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #1437065 (stock #B295)
Stonegate Antiques
$425.00
Presented as a historical and cultural artifact, this seldom-found, vintage, 1942, Ten Little Colored Boys book illustrated by Emery I. Gondor and published by Howell, Soskin Publishers, New York, is in near excellent condition.

Measuring 10.75 inches wide x 8.25 inches long, the book has seen extremely gentle use as evidenced by the perfect condition of the little boys' heads which, while providing visual interest, are primarily present to allow easy turning of each page. Given this purpose, it is quite remarkable that there is neither neck creasing nor edge wear! Front and back covers are constructed of heavy cardboard, the pages of heavier stock paper. The front board is in near perfect condition with minor corner wear on two of the four corner edges, and very subtle edge wear. The back board evidences minor soiling from handling.

Interestingly, on the very first page, a previous owner from long ago drew his or her own rendition of one of the little boys' heads using a very fine-tipped black ink pen, printing the words beneath it, "This is Karen's Book". This work is quite artistically rendered and blends right in with the original art on the page.

The book retains its brilliant, bright, crayon-box-like colors. The book has ten pages with alternating color and black and white illustrations as noted in photos. I did not have sufficient space to post photos of all pages, but those present are representative of overall condition. Some pages evidence a hint of age-discoloration, but all pages are free of rips and creasing. The binding is tight and the book retains its original, red, binding spiral.

Originally published in 1868 under the Title of “The Ten Little Indians,” this poem was used during minstrel shows, which oftentimes were traveling acts, performed by white actors in blackface following the Civil War. The following year, the poem was adapted to this overtly horrid, racist rendition, replacing the word Indians with “Nigger” in both minstrel shows, printed sheet music, and children’s nursery rhyme books. This version married the stereotypes of violence and ignorance within the African-American population with the intent of "villain-izing" freed black males while simultaneously allowing violent acts to befall the black characters portrayed in the rhyme.

This 1942 version having changed the derogatory term nigger to that of colored (equally derogatory), also depicts a somewhat tempered portrayal of the violence befalling the characters as compared to earlier versions of the rhyme.

The poem:
Ten little colored boys sitting in a line; one slid off the roof, then there were nine.
Nine little colored boys fished with worms for bait; one fell in the river, then there were eight.
Eight little colored boys flying up to heaven; one tried to parachute, then there were seven.
Seven little colored boys doing circus tricks; one teased an elephant, then there were six.
Six little colored boys found honey in a hive; one tried to pet a bee, then there were five.
Five little colored boys heard a lion roar; One didn't run in time, then there were four.
Four little colored boys started out to ski; One hit a snowman, then there were three.
Three little colored boys cooked some chicken stew; One ate the pot-ful, then there were two.
Two little colored boys playing with a gun; Thought it wasn't loaded, then there was one.
One little colored boy thought it would be fun to settle down and marry, then there was none.
He had a family of colored boys and then, before very long, there were ten of them again.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1920 item #1435457 (stock #BA950)
Stonegate Antiques
$125.00
Measuring 2 2/8 inches in diameter x 5/16 of an inch high, this rarely-found, circa 1910’s, dexterity game depicts a wide-eyed, black man wearing a hat, a wide white collar and a big red bow! The puzzle is quite colorful and is very visually appealing! The puzzle contains 5 tiny white balls of unknown material, that, with the proper manual dexterity, are to be placed two in the gent's eyes and the remaining three between the lips as teeth!

Constructed of tin with a cardboard lithographed image and a glass cover, this game has a mirrored back. The puzzle is in all-original condition with the graphic remaining in bright color and free of scratches and abrasions. The glass front is somewhat cloudy, although as one can see in photos, the image is readily visualized. The mirrored back shows significant loss of silvering due to its 110+ years of age. (Please disregard any light or shiny spots in photos which are due to flash reflection off of the glass.)

A delightful piece of early, pocket-toy, Black Memorabilia!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1426490 (stock #BA948)
Stonegate Antiques
$795.00
Measuring approximately 7.5 inches high, this highly sought after Black Vargas wax figure with a young child is mounted on its original wooden platform and is one of a series of fascinating "street character wax dolls" conceived of and crafted by Mrs. Conception Vargas Alfonso, daughter of the world-renowned, turn-of-the-20th century-New Orleans, Spanish sculptor, Francisco Vargas.

From approximately 1915 through the 1930's, Mrs. Vargas-Alphonso, influenced by the artistry of her father who also sculpted in wax, crafted a variety of wax dolls inspired by the black folk she saw on New Orleans's street corners while growing up. Sold exclusively at the time through Harriet's, of 318 Rue Royale in the French Quarter of New Orleans, the completely hand-made, one-of-a-kind dolls are seldom found on today's market due to their inherently fragile nature, making them highly sought after in the Black Memorabilia Collectible arena.

This figure, known as the Cotton Seller with Child, is most particularly hard to find and thus is quite highly sought after as it features a very young, female black child standing in a basket of newly-picked cotton. The Vargas family seldom included children or infants in their depictions of the numerous trades of black New Orleans folk, making any characterization featuring a child or an infant more than significantly rare.

Vargas wax figures are distinctly characterized by their interesting but highly exaggerated facial features. This female, Mama, Cotton Seller wears a red and white kerchief on her head, a red and white checked scarf around her neck, and a yellow and white checked shirt and skirt with an apron that matches her head scarf - all constructed of actual cloth fabric that was coated with a fine layer of clear wax to stiffen them. At her feet is a very large, wax-constructed basket made to simulate wicker that is filled with cotton and within which her young female child stands. The Cotton Seller's wax body is internally supported by a wire frame through which the figure is securely attached to the wooden base. The bottom of the base is stamped "Genuine VARGAS New Orleans, LA".

This wonderful figure is in amazing condition for her 75+ years of age with no apparent or visible imperfections other than some missing fingers, a condition which is quite common among found Vargas figures.

The Cotton Seller's young, female child also has some missing fingers, and additionally, her neck shows a contiguous crack all the way around. Because her structure is also supported by internal wiring, her head remains securely attached to her body. Please note that the child is merely placed inside the cotton basket and was never securely glued into it. The wax cotton basket, which was originally glued to the wooden base, has become loosened from it; however, when placed on the base, it will easily remain in place for display.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1418325 (stock #B289)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Offered is this 1931 copyright, LITTLE BLACK SAMBO Book with text and illustrations by the original author of this tale, Helen Bannerman. A David McKay Company publication of Phildelphia and Washington Square, copyright by Howard E. Altemus, with an introduction by George C. Harvey. Hardcover, 59 pages.

A much-beloved children's classic written in the early 1900's by Englishwoman, Helen Bannerman, for her two young daughters while they lived in India, Sambo, in the original tale, was an Indian boy and not an African-American child. He was converted over time to this race, however, by subsequent story tellers and illustrators. This age-old tale tells of Little Black Sambo and his frightening tiger encounter, which fortunately, has a happy ending!

Condition is 8 out of 10. This book has seen careful but frequent use with moderate wear to book cover edges as well as the red cloth spine cover. While the binding remains quite tight, surface soiling to covers and some interior pages is evident. The inside front cover reveals a penned inscription from an aunt to her nephew at Christmas, 1937.

This book retains outstanding, bold and brilliant coloring of all illustrations--- just fabulous---given its 89+ years of age!

There are small tears at the bottom of the following pages very near the bound side of the pages ranging from 1/2 to 1.5 inches long; some tears have old tape repairs: pages 9, 18, 19,20, 28, 33, 47, 49, 58.

A unique copy!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1418324 (stock #B290)
Stonegate Antiques
$75.00
Offered is this 1932 copyright, LITTLE BLACK SAMBO Book with illustrations signed "EULALIE", A Platt and Munk Company Book publication. Softcover, 10 un-numbered pages. These beautifully illustrated drawings alternate by page between full color and black ink. The Platt and Munk Company was renowned for its exquisite, highly-detailed illustrations of children's books.

This story is a much-beloved children's classic written in the early 1900's by Englishwoman, Helen Bannerman, for her two daughters while they lived in India. Sambo, in the original Bannerman tale, was an Indian boy and not an African-American child. He was converted to this race overtime, however, by subsequent story tellers and illustrators. This age-old tale tells of Little Black Sambo and his frightening tiger encounter, which fortunately, has a happy ending!

Condition is a 8.5 out of 10! This softcover book has seen very little use with just a teeny bit of wear to book edge points. The front and back inside covers have mild, age-related surface soiling. No tears, creases, or pen/pencil markings.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1417419 (stock #B288)
Stonegate Antiques
$95.00
Offered is this 1927 copyright, LITTLE BLACK SAMBO published by Rand McNally Company, Chicago. Hardcover, 64 pages.

Little Black Sambo is the featured story in this book with the short stories, "The Gingerbread Man" and Titty Mouse and Tatty Mouse", added in as extras. While the illustrator in unnamed in the book's credits, all illustrations are executed by the same hand and are either initialed MEP" or signed "Margaret Evans Price".

A much-beloved children's classic written in the early 1900's by Englishwoman, Helen Bannerman, for her two daughters while they lived in India, Sambo, in the original tale, was an Indian boy and not an African-American child. He was soon converted to this race, however, by subsequent story tellers and illustrators. This age-old tale tells of Little Black Sambo and his frightening tiger encounter, which fortunately, has a happy ending!

The book exterior has seen much wear as evidenced in the photos, with significant wear to all edges, which amazingly, has had no effect on the sturdy structure of this book! The interior of the book remains in absolutely perfect condition, with an undamaged, very tight binding, and not an imperfection to be found-- no rips, stains, creases--only the inked inscription of the last name, "Meyere" on the upper right corner of the title page (see photos).

Illustrations are lovely and have that timeless yet nostalgic look of fine work produced in the Art Deco era!

Little Black Sambo books from this period are infrequently found!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #1416927 (stock #B287)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Offered is this 1959 copyright, LITTLE BLACK SAMBO TELL-A-TALE Book with illustrations by Violet LaMont. A Whitman Book publication, copyright by Western Publishing, Racine, Wisconsin. Hardcover, 28 pages.

A much-beloved children's classic written in the early 1900's by Englishwoman, Helen Bannerman, for her two young daughters while they lived in India, Sambo, in the original tale, was an Indian boy and not an African-American child. He was converted over time to this race, however, by subsequent story tellers and illustrators. This age-old tale tells of Little Black Sambo and his frightening tiger encounter, which fortunately, has a happy ending!

Condition is a 9.5 out of 10! This book has seen very little use with just a teeny bit of wear to book edge points. The front and back inside covers appear to have 2 tape mark-like, rectangular stains that occurred during manufacture and were not the result of anyone placing clear tape inside the book as this "stain" spans front and back at the binding seam.

Otherwise perfect!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1413621 (stock #B291)
Stonegate Antiques
$95.00
JASBO BROWN AND SELECTED POEMS.

Author: Heyward, DuBose.
Title: JASBO BROWN AND SELECTED POEMS.
Subject: African-American Experience and Culture of Charleston, South Carolina Publication: New York: Farrar & Rinehart, (1931)
Edition: First Edition

Description: First edition. Hardcover, gilt-stamped brown cloth. First printing. 96 pages. A tight very good plus copy with a partial, former ownership bookplate with minor writing, some tiny chipping to the spine ends. No dust jacket.

Farrar & Rinehart, Inc. indicated their First Editions by the small oval logo forming the letters F an R immediately above the copyright line on the back of the title page.

The 1924 date is for the copyright date of the poetry, the 1931 is the date of first publication in book form.

Edwin DuBose Heyward (August 31, 1885 – June 16, 1940) was an American author who was born and raised in Charleston, South Carolina. He is best known for his 1925 novel Porgy. He and his wife Dorothy, a playwright, adapted it as a 1927 play of the same name. The couple worked with composer George Gershwin to adapt the work as the 1935 opera Porgy and Bess. It was later adapted as a 1959 film of the same name. Heyward also wrote poetry and other novels and plays, and this book of selected poems reflected his observations of and experiences with black culture in Charleston during his childhood.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #1413567 (stock #BA822)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Offered is the fabulously RARE BIGGER HAIR Negro Tobacco container produced from the mid 1940's through the early 1960's. This container is actually constructed of cardboard with tin base, and is much less frequently found, and thus, much more rare than the earlier, all-metal, and scarce-in-its-own-right, Nigger Hair container due to the greater fragility of cardboard as compared to metal, as well as the fewer numbers of cardboard containers produced.

Following the conclusion of World War II, the American Tobacco Company of Virginia changed its product name from Nigger Hair to Bigger Hair, seeking to broaden the product's marketing appeal as well as viewing the latter label as the more-socially acceptable one. (The earlier Nigger Hair moniker was used by the American Tobacco Company from the 1890's through the early, pre-WWII 1940s; the lithographed can was manufactured by the B. Leidersdorf Company, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.) Interestingly, the company DID NOT change the image of the African woman, but merely added the words Fiji Islander to the left of her face in its indifferent and weak attempt to move further away from the earlier, severely derogatory label.

Measuring 7 inches high x 5 3/4 inches wide, the container is in good condition, perhaps a 7 out of 10, with one side exhibiting minor surface scuffing, while on the other side more scuffs and rubs are evident. Some minor wear around the edge of the top of the container likely occurred from simply taking the cover on and off; however, this is completely concealed by the cover. The original cardboard cover was lost with the passage of time; the replacement tin cover shown was in place when this container was acquired.

The original brownish orange color of the container remains consistent throughout, and the structural integrity of the cardboard is quite sturdy. Superficial rust is evident on the inside and outside of the metal base; this rust does not impact integrity of the tin base. The container retains partial remnants of its paper Federal Revenue Tobacco seal on both sides.

This very rare tobacco container is just a wonderful example of latter Black Americana advertising. The container looks better "in person" than in the photos as the camera actually accentuated the appearance of the scuffing, especially on the "better" side!

If the Nigger Hair Tobacco container is currently in your collection, the addition of the Bigger Hair container will complete your collection from both a cultural and historical perspective!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1405035 (stock #BA947)
Stonegate Antiques
$275.00
Offered is an extraordinarily rare, 1930's, Googly-Eyed Tea Pot made in Japan. A Google search on this item yields NO other vintage, 1930s Japan, Mammy, Googly-eyed Teapots available, further attesting to this piece's rarity!

This particular piece is in very fine condition, with cold-paint flaking on the spout and lid edge decoration noted as this piece's only readily-visualized flaws. (Cold paint refers to paint applied AFTER a piece has been painted, glazed, and fired in a kiln. Because this after-paint is not glazed and fired, it is easily subjected to flaking and disintegration.)

The teapot remains in fabulous, all-original condition with its twisted-wire, original, bail handle intact and in fine condition. The tea pot measures 5.5 inches wide from the edge of its spout and across the body to the opposite side. With its handle upright, the pot measures 7.75 inches tall. The teapot with lid, absent the handle, measures 5.25 inches tall. It is 5.75 inches wide.

As noted previously, the teapot spout presents flaking of its green paint, with two tiny flea bites present on the tip of the spout detected only via touch versus the eye. The pot has no chips, cracks, repairs or repaint. There are very teeny surface rubs on the left cheek, but these are paint flaws which occurred prior to glaze application and firing. There are also two teeny "dots"-- one on the forehead and one just to the inside corner of the right eye that are also flaws created either right before or during firing.

This fabulously RARE piece displays just wonderfully and would be a prized asset in the collection of any advanced collector! And its diminutive size makes it easy for one to display in one's collection!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1401924 (stock #BA942)
Stonegate Antiques
$95.00
Measuring approximately 10.5 inches tall, these sweet, hand-made, circa 1930's, Great Depression era, Mammy and Pappy dolls feature dried apples as heads! Common household items such as chicken or turkey breast bones, dried corn cobs, old rubber baby bottle nipples, wooden clothespins and dried fruit were frequently employed to make play-dolls when money was tight and store-bought toys were beyond reach!

These two folk art pieces came straight from the 93 year old great grandma who played with them as a child!

While the heads were constructed from dried apples painted black, the bodies were cut from various pieces of sponge which were then hand-sewn together. Hands were cut from pink--- and not brown or black felt--very interesting---while the teeth were formed from tiny white beads, and the white fuzzy hair fashioned from nothing more than small, cotton batting pieces. Eyes are glued-on googly eyes.

The homemade clothing is nicely constructed via a combination of hand and machine sewing. Mammy's green, teal and rust flowered dress is embellished with a bit of lace at the sleeves, and she also wears a fancy, white eyelet petticoat and a soft pink crocheted shawl. She is barefoot. Pappy's light blue shirt features 3 button detailing, and he wears denim pants and black felt shoes and hat with a red felt vest.

Condition is quite fine with no observable issues! No odors, rips, stains or missing parts. A very sweet pair!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1401865 (stock #BA941)
Stonegate Antiques
$75.00
Measuring a diminutive 8" long x 5.5" wide, this very sweet Mammy string holder was completely hand-painted and hand-constructed with the sole exception of the machine-stitched opening in her dress that allows placement and/or removal of the ball of string.

The neck opening, arm openings and the hem of her cream and red flowered dress are all hand-stitched. Her head and torso, cut from a piece of wood, are completely hand-painted, and the facial details and head scarf details were executed with a very fine-tipped paintbrush and were very nicely done! Mammy's dress contains a ball of old cotton string which is allowed exit through a small circular hole cut into her mouth.

Paint condition is very good with only slight edge wear and a couple of very subtle, tiny surface scratches. There are no rips, tears or wear to Mammy's dress, but some small staining splotches on the left side edges of her dress in front and in back are evident. A small eyelet was screwed into the top of Mammy's head with a string attached to allow for hanging and easy access.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1400400 (stock #BA939-940)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Offered are two absolutely wonderful, cast iron, still, penny banks manufactured by the AC Williams Company of Ravenna, Ohio, manufactured in the first quarter of the 20th century.

The banks may be purchased as a pair for $425.00, or they may be separately purchased as follows: Mammy with Spoon $295.00 and Black Man Darkey Sharecropper $225.

The Mammy with a Spoon measures 5 7/8 inches high and was produced between 1905 and 1930. She retains much of her original paint and exudes a warm, rich patina commensurate with a well-loved antique of approximately 100 years of age. She wears a blue dress, black shoes, a silver apron and a red kerchief that still retains some of its white polka dots. Mammy holds a gold-colored spoon in her right hand while placing her left hand firmly on her hip. Mammy means business!

The Black Man Darkey Sharecropper measures 5 1/2 inches high and was manufactured from 1901 to 1930. He retains most of his original paint showing less paint wear than Mammy and also exudes a very warm, rich patina. He wears black pants with red suspenders and a gold hat and gold shirt with red collar. He wears black shoes; however, his left black shoe is worn through at the toes, resulting in all five toes peeking out! He stands casually with his hands in his pocket. His back screw, while an old one, is a replacement.

Mammy and the Darkey Sharecropper were clearly manufactured as companion pieces given their similar size and stance. Both stand freely and would make wonderful additions to the well-curated, antique, Black Americana collection.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1371023 (stock #BA936)
Stonegate Antiques
$195.00
Measuring 15.5 inches long, this delightful, folk-art styled, cloth and stocking-constructed rag doll was made circa 1920's.

Detailing in construction sets this sweet black doll apart! Her creation was very carefully executed through a combination of hand and machine stitching. She was lovingly dressed in machine-stitched clothing made from old red, pink, cream and rose-patterned scraps of cloth, while her body was hand-sewn and constructed of old, black stockings stuffed with cotton batting.

This young girl's nose and mouth are hand-embroidered, while her eyes are represented by small, black buttons. Her hand-applied and stitched hair is made of black wool yarn and has been fashioned into braided pigtails edged with faded red ribbon bows with fluffy bangs topping her forehead. Her hands are carefully hand-stitched to delineate fingers.

This sweetie is in near perfect condition with the exception of some fading to her clothing as well as two age-related, small holes to her stocking-constructed left foot and lower leg. (This wear and fading to the fabrics and stockings used in her construction may well be the very reason they were used, as they may have been discarded from personal use. Please refer to photos to view wear.)

Purchased in Charleston, South Carolina. Simply full of charm with lovely touches! A quite difficult-to-find-in-this condition, 90+-year-old, cloth rag doll!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 2000 item #1370230 (stock #BA935)
Stonegate Antiques
$125.00
This delightful Black Boy Rag Doll has a face with a story to tell! What an expression!

Measuring 13 inches tall, he is constructed of black, machine-stitched, vintage 1930-1940's, polished cotton which has been stuffed with cotton batting. Facial features have been hand-embroidered, are quite expressive and are exceedingly well done. His hair has been styled in tightly wound little ringlets.

His brown-patterned, machine-stitched shirt and pants are also vintage 1930-40's fabric, accented with two miss-matched buttons holding up cute red suspenders.

A delightful piece of Black Memorabilia Folk Art! This wonderful, 1940's-vintage-look, one-of-a-kind, Artisan Doll was constructed in the 1990's by a Maine Folk Artist who is now deceased.

Please take a moment to view his big sister by typing the words "Maine Doll" into the SEARCH box.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1370224 (stock #BA934AB)
Stonegate Antiques
$85.00
This charming pair of vintage, wooden, Black Railroad Porter and Mammy clothes brushes were both made in the 1930's by the Rhody Brush Company of Woonsocket, Rhode Island.

Both of these colorful brushes have natural bristles with the Porter measuring 7.5 inches high and the Mammy measuring 6.5 inches high.

The Railroad Porter brush has minor paint wear to his cream colored pant legs, to the edges of his cream colored hat and also has some very teeny paint wear spots round his eyes. The Porter's ear is consistent with where one would hold onto the brush while using it.

The Mammy brush is in near excellent condition with little evidence of having ever been used. Love the expression on her face! If one carefully separates the natural bristles, it is evident that at one time they were dyed green to match her bodice, but have lost their applied color with the passing of time.

Please note that the white spots seen in the photos are lighting reflections and are NOT areas of missing paint. If one looks closely, the teeny areas of missing paint can be distinguished from the light reflections.

The Mammy brush is priced at $85, the Porter priced at $70.

Please take the time to peruse our second grouping a Mammy and Porter brushes, listed separately.