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All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #479340 (stock #BA563)
Stonegate Antiques
$495.00
C1920s Cast Iron Hubley Black Mammy Soap Dish In fine form with very minimal paint loss as seen in photos, this wonderful circa 1920's, cast iron, Hubley BLACK MAMMY SOAP DISH is in all-original condition- no repaint!

Measuring 5 1/8 inches tall with soap dish attached, Mammy's colors- her deep red dress, mustard yellow shawl, and yellow and red polka dot head scarf- remain vibrant and brilliant with a wonderful old patina! Her face features large, dark eyes and a smiling, red mouth.

The soap dish is designed to be removed, and its anchoring cast iron peg fits into a hole atop Mammy's head. The exterior of the soap dish is cast to resemble a wicker laundry basket and is painted a slightly lighter-toned, mustard yellow.

A delightful, vintage piece of early Black Americana in premium condition!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #678442 (stock #BA633)
Stonegate Antiques
$45.00
This wonderfully rare, 1920s piece of Black Memorabilia ephemera is in utterly fabulous condition!

Measuring 7.50 inches long x 3.25 inches wide, this Belgian cigarette or cigar, heavy paper/cardboard box features a fabulous litho of a very dapper Black Gentleman smoking one of the "JOHN" cigarettes. Its small size offers many options for display including framing for shelf or wall enjoyment.

A truly scarce find in phenomenal condition!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #383458 (stock #BA479)
Stonegate Antiques
$145.00
Measuring 5 1/2 x 7 1/2, this framed piece of early Black Memorabilia features the hardboard cover only (not the complete book) of "The DARKIES' Painting Book"! Cover depicts 2 jauntily stepping Black children. Color is quite vivid in this very visually-striking piece! Protected in a gold-tone, decorative frame. (Please disregard unavoidable reflections in the glass)

Delightful item!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #560844 (stock #BA627A)
Stonegate Antiques
$14.00
While the photo depicts a grouping of 3 different, vintage 1930-40's, French Rum labels, only the oval label is available at $14.00, as the other 2 have been sold.

The label is unused and is in excellent condition with wonderful, even coloring (any appearance of fading is due to light reflection only).

Approximate measurements: the oval label measures 4.50 x 3.50 inches.

Would look wonderful framed!!

Please take a moment to view my other grouping of vintage French rum labels!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1195081 (stock #B124)
Stonegate Antiques
$115.00
Originally published in 1914 by Rand McNally & Company, this edition of this very delightful little story book was published in 1937 and features the tale of Watermelon Pete and his adventures along with five other little stories. The five stories that follow Watermelon Pete do not feature Pete and instead represent a diverse collection of nursery-like tales for young folk.

The stories were written by Elizabeth Gordon and are whimsically illustrated in color by Clara Powers Wilson.

In fine condition with light wear to exterior boards. An early owners name appears inscribed on the title page. A small folio size measuring 5.25 inches x 6.75 inches.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #1197569 (stock #BA850)
Stonegate Antiques
$895.00
Measuring 12.25 inches long x 8 inches in width, this two-sided, 19th century estate document listing all of the worldly goods of LEWIS MATTAIR is de-accessioned from the inventory of the ill-fated Middle Passage Museum (see museum history below). The document is undated but is estimated to be circa 1865-66 based on current research of federal and state archival documents.

This particular estate document is extraordinarily unique and atypical in comparison to other estate documents of this period as it lists 15 SLAVES among the articles of property, and it actually labels these individuals as SLAVES as opposed to the much more common and typical practice of listing "Slaves" as "Negroes". The slaves are listed on the back side of the document with all other inventory listed on the front side.

Each slave is listed by first name with the corresponding current market value written to the left of the name, with the total market value of the 15 slaves named at $8600-- quite a hefty sum when one considers that the remainder of the estate (furniture, livestock, transportation and work vehicles, tools, etc) is valued in total at $980.75. Also listed in the inventory was 13,000 pounds of seed cotton, indicating that Lewis Mattair owned a sizable cotton plantation, clearly farmed by the slaves.

Lewis Mattair is noted in the 1860 Federal Census as a resident of Suwanee County, Florida; the 1860 Federal Census- Slave Schedules references Lewis Mattair owning 28 male and female slaves, ranging in age from 4 to 58. Lewis Mattair is listed in the 1865 Florida Tax records, but his name does not appear in any archived state or federal records after that year. Thus, it is presumed that this document dates from or just prior to 1865, the year that the Civil War ended.

The Middle Passage Museum was the dream of Jim and Mary Anne Petty of Mississippi as well as that of an anonymous Georgian benefactor who had together compiled a collection of slave artifacts numbering over 15,000 pieces and who had hoped to find a permanent site in Mobile, Alabama, for their museum. While they formed a non-profit organization to raise funds for their hoped-for museum, their dream was never realized.

In a 2003 statement, Jim Petty remarked, "The importance of the exhibit of these artifacts is to understand the harshness of what slavery and segregation was all about. The items in the exhibit remind us of the terrible heinousness of slavery. Viewing the collection can be very emotional, but it is a tool through which we can understand, honor and respect a great culture. We want to realize that out of slavery, a great culture emerged, and carried on, and continued to strive for a better life regardless of the adverse conditions that were placed upon them."

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1244288 (stock #BA897)
Stonegate Antiques
$695.00
Measuring 9-7/8 tall x 13-1/2 inches wide, this extraordinarily rare, Jim Crow era, segregation sign advertises a "colored-only" hotel, Coleman's of Ashland, Virginia.

Constructed of cardboard with black printing, this circa 1930-40's sign reads: " Coleman's Hotel Colored. Special Attention to Tourists. Ashland Virginia".

The sign remains in all-original condition inclusive of minor discoloration as noted in photos and small chips to the upper right and lower left corners. Print source is noted: "Herald-Progress Print, Ashland, VA".

This is NOT a reproduction, but rather a fortunate preservation. It is quite amazing that this sign has survived the many years being constructed out of cardboard. It was clearly stored away in such a manner that preserved its original condition.

Travel for African Americans during the Jim Crow period was difficult and complicated, with limited options for eating, sleeping, even procuring gasoline for the car. As a result, black-owned hotels and motels placed signs such as this one prominently in their windows. There were even special travel-guides to help African Americans plan their trips, hopefully, without incident. Victor Green's "Green Guide" provided state by state lists of colored hotels, motels and other travel-related businesses that catered to African-Americans.

Quite possibly the ONLY sign remaining extant from this particular, racially segregated establishment. An historically significant piece!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 2000 item #451878 (stock #BA560)
Stonegate Antiques
$75.00
Offered is an authentic signed baseball from former Negro League player CLIFFORD LAYTON. The ball was signed for me at an autograph show and is dated 4-15-05.

Mr. Layton was a skilled pitcher with a strong bat who had a four-year career in the Negro Leagues, playing for the Indianapolis Clowns, the New York Black Yankees and the Raleigh Tigers. One of his teammates was a promising infielder by the name of Hank Aaron, who signed with the Boston Braves in 1952, and eventually became a Hall of Famer. Layton received an invitation in 1951 to try out for the Brooklyn Dodgers, but by then his shoulder was troubling him so he declined, hoping it would heal and another opportunity would present, which unfortunately never came. As of 2016, Mr. Layton, at the age of 87, was enjoying retirement as an associate pastor in a North Carolina ministry.

A brief history of the Negro League:

African-Americans first began to play baseball in the late 1800s on military teams, college teams, and company teams, eventually finding their way to the established professional baseball teams of white players. However, racism and “Jim Crow” laws would force African-Americans from these teams by 1900, with black players left to form their own teams.

In 1920, an organized league structure was formed under the guidance of Andrew “Rube” Foster, a former player, manager, and owner for the Chicago American Giants. In a meeting held at the Paseo YMCA in Kansas City, Mo., Foster and several other Midwestern team owners joined to form the Negro National League. Soon, rival leagues formed in Eastern and Southern states, which brought black baseball to major urban centers and to rural countrysides in the U.S., Canada, and Latin America. The Leagues maintained a high level of professional skill and inspired economic development in many black communities.

In 1945, when Major League Baseball’s Brooklyn Dodgers recruited Jackie Robinson from the Kansas City Monarchs, Robinson became the first African-American in the modern era to play on a Major League roster. While this historic event was a key moment in baseball and civil rights history, it marked the decline of the Negro Leagues. The best black players began to be recruited for the Major Leagues with their black fans following them, and the last Negro Leagues teams folded in the early 1960s.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #706869 (stock #BA672)
Stonegate Antiques
$95.00
Measuring only 2.75 inches high, this darling 1920's Black Memorabilia souvenir piece is in amazing condition considering its delicate, sea shell construction.

A tiny bisque black boy holding a watermelon slice is seated on a throne of sea shells. The name of the location that this sea shell souvenir was meant to commemorate is worn and is no longer readable.

Two very minor chips are present as shown in photos which do not detract from the beauty of this piece!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #808062 (stock #BA727)
Stonegate Antiques
$575.00
An extraordinarily RARE 19th CENTURY piece of Black Americana advertising featuring a fabulous graphic of 2 young African American painters holding a "White-Wash Boy's Hydrated Lime" box.

This product was produced by the lime manufacturers, Hatmaker and Place, of Canaan, Connecticut, in the late 1800s. This small company was located within a large "lime belt" that stretched from Connecticut to Vermont. Back in the day, lime powder mixed with water was quite commonly used to "white wash" or paint numerous surfaces, and it was also used as a medicinal disinfectant! The manufacture of lime from marble was one of the earliest and most successful mineral industries in Connecticut, with historical records dating the establishment of the first CT lime manufactory to 1722.

Given its age and the fragility of paper, condition of this wonderful box is quite good. The lower portion of the back side of the box evidences light surface wear with some of the printing on the lower portion of the box worn away as a result. The front of the box has a 3.25 inch long tear which resulted in the loss of the lime powder from the box.

This early piece of Black Americana advertising is EXCEEDINGLY RARE and may well be a ONE-OF-A-Kind item! The Hatmaker and Place Company was one of a number of very small manufactories located within the "lime belt" that were ALL bought out and immediately closed down by a wealthy group of investors who then created and incorporated the mammoth monopoly, The New England Lime Company, early in 1902.

This fabulous piece of Black Americana is NOT to be missed by the serious collector!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #794507 (stock #BA709)
Stonegate Antiques
$475.00
Offered are two utterly fabulous, one-of-a-kind, DOUBLE-SIDED, hand-painted signs that hung at Joe's "Colored Only" fish shack near Albany, Georgia, on the Flint River. These signs were created by the black folks who owned the shack which closed in the late 1950s, early 1960s. The folks had an area to eat in --serving pig ears and fish-- and also caught and cleaned fish.

These signs have a very colorful, folk-art appeal and certainly are utterly unique! They very much fit into the American, Southern "Outsider Art" collecting genre, a genre which highlights the work of self-taught, rural area artists who create fabulous and highly expressive art using the media and materials that they have at hand and which reflects the world that they know and live in.

The signs are quite heavy as each is made from a solid wood board. The signs are nearly identical in size and measure approximately 25 1/2 inches wide x 14 5/8 high x 3/4ths of an inch thick. One of the signs has very, very slight warping, but the warpage is not readily evident as seen by pictures. Each sign has 2 holes from which to hang them, and the old rusted hanging wire which is seen in the photos has been replaced by new hanging wire.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #192629 (stock #BA353B)
Stonegate Antiques
$65.00
Measuring approximately 23 inches high X 18 inches wide, this heavy cardboard restaurant menu from the 1940’s has never been used! This menu board was designed by the manufacturer to be a consumable, throw-away --- for jotting down the ever-changing, daily menu “Specials”!

Featuring a delightful, cartoon-like caricature of a black man, this board is in very good condition with minor edge wear, slight age-discoloration and a teeny missing piece of the front rim of the hat.

An interesting, seldom-found piece of Black Memorabilia!

Please disregard reflections in photos that are due to the presence of protective plastic wrap.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #1208317 (stock #B286)
Stonegate Antiques
$425.00
Presented as an historical and cultural artifact, this seldom-found, vintage, 1942, Ten Little Colored Boys book illustrated by Emery I. Gondor and published by Howell, Soskin Publishers, New York, is in very good condition.

Measuring 10.75 inches wide x 8.25 inches long, the book has seen gentle use as evidenced by the fairly good condition of the little boys' heads which, while providing visual interest, are primarily present to allow easy turning of each page. Given this purpose, neck creasing and edge wear is expected and evident. Corner and edge wear of front and back boards is present, as is a brown oval stain on the front board near the word "little". Front and back covers are constructed of heavy cardboard, the pages of heavier stock paper. Both the front and back boards evidence age discoloration and some foxing, and a bit of vintage staining from handling on the back board.

The book retains its brilliant, bright, crayon-box-like colors. The book has ten pages with alternating color and black and white illustrations as noted in photos. I did not have sufficient space to post photos of all pages, but those present are representative of overall condition. Some pages evidence foxing, but all pages are free of rips and creasing. The binding is tight and the book retains its original, red, binding spiral.

Originally published in 1868 under the Title of “The Ten Little Indians,” this poem was used during minstrel shows, which oftentimes were traveling acts, performed by white actors in blackface following the Civil War. The following year, the poem was adapted to this overtly horrid, racist rendition, replacing the word Indians with “Nigger” in both minstrel shows, printed sheet music, and children’s nursery rhyme books. This version married the stereotypes of violence and ignorance within the African-American population with the intent of villainizing freed black males while simultaneously allowing violence acts to befall the black characters portrayed in the rhyme.

This 1942 version having changed the derogatory term nigger to that of colored (equally derogatory), also depicts a somewhat tempered portrayal of the violence befalling the characters as compared to earlier versions of the rhyme.

The poem:
Ten little colored boys sitting in a line; one slid off the roof, then there were nine.
Nine little colored boys fished with worms for bait; one fell in the river, then there were eight.
Eight little colored boys flying up to heaven; one tried to parachute, then there were seven.
Seven little colored boys doing circus tricks; one teased an elephant, then there were six.
Six little colored boys found honey in a hive; one tried to pet a bee, then there were five.
Five little colored boys heard a lion roar; One didn't run in time, then there were four.
Four little colored boys started out to ski; One hit a snowman, then there were three.
Three little colored boys cooked some chicken stew; One ate the pot-ful, then there were two.
Two little colored boys playing with a gun; Thought it wasn't loaded, then there was one.
One little colored boy thought it would be fun to settle down and marry, then there was none.
He had a family of colored boys and then, before very long, there were ten of them again.

To view other versions of this book presently available for separate purchase, please type the words "ten little" into the SEARCH box on our home page.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1150526 (stock #BA828)
Stonegate Antiques
$125.00
Measuring 1 3/4 inches in diameter x 3/8 of an inch high, this circa 1920’s, dexterity game puzzle depicts a fancily dressed and top-hatted black man! Likely German-made, the puzzle is without markings. Vibrant color and detailing! The puzzle contains 4 tiny white balls, that with the proper manual dexterity, are to be placed in the gent’s mouth, eyes and bow tie!

Constructed of tin with a cardboard lithographed image and a glass cover, this game is backed with its original mirror. The puzzle is in all-original condition with the lithographed graphic remaining free of scratches and abrasions. The glass is rippled but is not damaged as it remains smooth to the touch. A "defective" piece of glass was likely just simply chosen for use. The mirror shows some tiny bits of loss to silvering as noted in photos. (Please disregard any light or shiny spots in photos which are due to flash reflection off of the glass.)

An interesting image and a delightful piece of early Black Memorabilia!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1405035 (stock #BA947)
Stonegate Antiques
$275.00
Offered is an extraordinarily rare, 1930's, Googly-Eyed Tea Pot made in Japan. A Google search on this item yields NO other vintage, 1930s Japan, Mammy, Googly-eyed Teapots available, further attesting to this piece's rarity!

This particular piece is in very fine condition, with cold-paint flaking on the spout and lid edge decoration noted as this piece's only readily-visualized flaws. (Cold paint refers to paint applied AFTER a piece has been painted, glazed, and fired in a kiln. Because this after-paint is not glazed and fired, it is easily subjected to flaking and disintegration.)

The teapot remains in fabulous, all-original condition with its twisted-wire, original, bail handle intact and in fine condition. The tea pot measures 5.5 inches wide from the edge of its spout and across the body to the opposite side. With its handle upright, the pot measures 7.75 inches tall. The teapot with lid, absent the handle, measures 5.25 inches tall. It is 5.75 inches wide.

As noted previously, the teapot spout presents flaking of its green paint, with two tiny flea bites present on the tip of the spout detected only via touch versus the eye. The pot has no chips, cracks, repairs or repaint. There are very teeny surface rubs on the left cheek, but these are paint flaws which occurred prior to glaze application and firing. There are also two teeny "dots"-- one on the forehead and one just to the inside corner of the right eye that are also flaws created either right before or during firing.

This fabulously RARE piece displays just wonderfully and would be a prized asset in the collection of any advanced collector! And its diminutive size makes it easy for one to display in one's collection!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1970 item #272747 (stock #BA260ADBA395)
Stonegate Antiques
$38.00
Offered for individual sale is a grouping of five, circa 1960's, "Days of the Week", cotton muslin Hand Towels featuring a cross-stitched Mammy hard at work tackling a different household chore on each day! The towels are priced at $38 each or $160 for all five towels. Please specify preference when making inquiries.

Four of the hand towels were made by the same individual, and are entirely hand-cross-stitched and hand-hemmed on a somewhat heavy-weight, cream-colored, cotton muslin. They measure approximately 36 inches square.

These four towels are as follows: "Monday"- featuring Mammy washing clothes in a wooden barrel, "Tuesday" featuring Mammy hanging clothes to dry on the clothesline, "Wednesday" featuring Mammy mending clothes, and "Thursday" featuring Mammy delivering a hand-picked, flower bouquet to a neighbor. Condition of all four towels is quite good with small, scattered, stain spots here and there- none in the area of the cross-stitching.

The fifth towel, "Friday", is made of a slightly lighter weight and whiter-colored, cotton muslin. It measures 28 x 29 inches, and again, it has a tiny stain spot here and there away from the cross-stitched area. The hems are machine stitched but the cross-stitching is hand-completed. This towel features a humorous scene of Mammy serving/making pancakes while a pitcher of milk or water unknowingly spills behind her!

These delightful towels would look charming folded and displayed on a kitchen wall rack or could even be framed - folded so that only the cross-stitched area is visible in the frame!

As each towel is priced separately, please email us stating which item you wish to purchase so that we can customize your order form.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1224370 (stock #BA884)
Stonegate Antiques
$450.00
This fabulous 1930's American Beach cast iron sign reading "AMERICAN BEACH FLA Negro Ocean Playground" is in very fine condition with remnants of original paint and vintage patina. This is NOT a reproduction! This sign was originally sold to be used as a license plate topper by African American folks frequenting this beach. It measures 11 inches in length x 4.50 inches high at its tallest point.

American Beach was established in 1935 on Florida's east coast under the leadership of Abraham Lincoln Lewis, one of seven co-founders of the Afro-American Life Insurance Company, and one of Florida's first black millionaires. His vision was to create a beach resort as a benefit for company executives and as an incentive for employees.

In the era of Jim Crow segregation laws, few public places in Florida or the rest of the South were open to African Americans. From the Depression until well into the 1960's, American Beach served as a holiday and vacation destination for thousands of African Americans, and was a magnet for black celebrities such as entertainers Cab Calloway and Ray Charles, heavyweight boxing champion Joe Louis and writer Zora Neale Hurston.

But in 1964, the area began to decline. Hurricane Dora destroyed much of the beach, and passage of the Civil Rights Act meant that blacks were, finally, no longer restricted to segregated beaches and the businesses that catered to them.

A fabulous and historically relevant piece of Black Americana!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1369660 (stock #BA931)
Stonegate Antiques
$145.00
Vividly colored, this unusual, C1920s, Black Memorabilia-themed, advertising diecut measuring 12 3/4" long x 8 1/2" wide, features two utterly horrified, shabbily attired, young, African-American girls faced with an encounter with a very diminutive, very equally-upset dog-- a deliberately crafted, most unfortunate, stereotypical image used to advertise who knows what back in the day!

Recently acquired from a private collection, the framed diecut is without glass (which can be easily and inexpensively added).

The embossed-surface diecut is in near excellent condition, the only noted issue being a crease in the bigger girl's left leg (see close-up photo). An unusual find, with vivid, colorful imagery!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #674199 (stock #BA653)
Stonegate Antiques
$150.00
Measuring just 4.5" wide x 5.5" long, this very rarely found, circa 1940's, metal mechanical toy features the beloved Golliwogg character!

Unmarked, this toy is in very good condition with tiny superficial surface scratches wherever metal rubs metal during toy movement. To operate the toy, one simply squeezes the metal lever on the back, which causes the clown to hit poor Golly on the head with a mallet!

A brief history of the Golliwog doll: The Golliwog is based on a Black minstrel doll that the Victorian era illustrator, Florence Kate Upton, born in 1873, had played with as a small child in New York. Upton's Golliwog character was first introduced to the world in her 1895 book entitled The Adventures of Two Dutch Dolls. Like the rag doll that inspired it, the Golliwog in her book was an ugly creature with very dark, jet black skin, large white-rimmed eyes, red clown lips, and wild, frizzy hair. Golliwogs are typically male and are generally dressed in a jacket, trousers, bow tie, and stand-up collar in a combination of red, white, blue, black, and occasionally yellow colors.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 2000 item #795150 (stock #BA352)
Stonegate Antiques
$195.00
This delightful Black Mammy Rag Doll has a face with a story to tell! What an expression!

Measuring 18 inches tall, Mammy is constructed of black, machine-stitched, vintage 1930-1940's, polished cotton which has been stuffed with cotton batting. Facial features have been hand-embroidered, are quite expressive, and are exceedingly well done. Her hair has been styled in six pigtails adorned with bows.

Mammy's red, machine-stitched dress is also vintage 1930-40's fabric and features the classic Grecian Key design in white.

A delightful piece of Black Memorabilia Folk Art! This wonderful, 1940's-vintage-look, one-of-a-kind, Artisan Doll was constructed in the 1990's by a Maine Folk Art crafts-person who is now deceased.

Please take a moment to view her little brother by typing the words "Maine Doll" into the SEARCH box.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #404295 (stock #B292)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
"Beloved Belindy" was the MAMMY of the well-known Raggedy Ann and Raggedy Andy dolls!!!

This rarely found copy was written and illustrated by the renowned author of a number of Raggedy Ann and Raggedy Andy stories of the period, Johnny Gruelle. The book was published in both the United States and Great Britain in 1926, by the P.F. Volland Company of Joliet, Illinois.

This copy has superficial scratches to the front and back covers, wear on book cover edges, inside cover has a small black marker smear, inside front & back covers have minor soiling here and there(see photos). The binding is super-tight and all pages remain very clean and present.

The book is eleven chapters in length, approximately 88 unnumbered pages. Book is filled with a variety of wonderful black-ink and full-color illustrations as represented in photos. PLEASE NOTE: in the photos, the printing seems somewhat light and faded- not so! It is merely the function of over-lighting or light reflection.

A wonderful and truly RARE book not to be missed--- it currently lists in Black Memorabilia books at $200-250!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #520456 (stock #BA595)
Stonegate Antiques
$25.00
Measuring a very diminutive 2 inches long x 1 ½ inches wide x ½ inch deep, this tiny cardboard match box was made in Sweden in the 1930’s. It still retains its wonderful lithographed image of a Black Man carrying jugs of coconut juice among the palm trees. It is entitled “THE PALMTREE” and is additionally labeled “IMPREGNATED SAFETY MATCH, MADE IN SWEDEN” along the bottom of the litho. It is in near mint condition but no longer contains any matches! The box simply slides out of its cardboard casing with a push of the finger!
All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 2000 item #1370230 (stock #BA935)
Stonegate Antiques
$125.00
This delightful Black Boy Rag Doll has a face with a story to tell! What an expression!

Measuring 13 inches tall, he is constructed of black, machine-stitched, vintage 1930-1940's, polished cotton which has been stuffed with cotton batting. Facial features have been hand-embroidered, are quite expressive and are exceedingly well done. His hair has been styled in tightly wound little ringlets.

His brown-patterned, machine-stitched shirt and pants are also vintage 1930-40's fabric, accented with two miss-matched buttons holding up cute red suspenders.

A delightful piece of Black Memorabilia Folk Art! This wonderful, 1940's-vintage-look, one-of-a-kind, Artisan Doll was constructed in the 1990's by a Maine Folk Artist who is now deceased.

Please take a moment to view his big sister by typing the words "Maine Doll" into the SEARCH box.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #1266375 (stock #BA917)
Stonegate Antiques
$185.00
Measuring 3 3/4 inches tall, this rarely found, bisque, black baby doll rests in a 6 inch long Peanut!

The little black doll retains its original cloth diaper and swaddling blanket with arm holes. The blanket shows spotted soiling. The baby doll features a nicely hand-painted face with the bisque in excellent condition with the exception of the right foot. The top front of the right foot appears to have been chipped during production as it retains the original paint that is applied over the white bisque during the manufacturing process. The doll is marked on its upper back: "made in Japan".

The 2 piece peanut shell is quite lightweight and appears to be made of layers of heat-pressed paper that was fashioned into a peanut via a mold. The two peanut shells retain the original hinges. A 1 inch long piece of the interior paper liner has separated from the peanut shell, but the separated piece remains (see photo). These delicate peanut shells are in fine condition overall!

Perhaps originally intended as an ornament, the peanut shell still retains a hanging string at its top edge. A rarely found piece of Black Memorabilia!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1920 item #854536 (stock #BA387)
Stonegate Antiques
$35.00
Offered are four different, circa 1900-1910, Jim Crow era, stereoview cards, priced at $35.00 each or all four cards for $120.00. All are in fine condition, and all but "Waitin Fo De End Man" have a detailed, historical description on the reverse side.

Featured are "Hoeing Rice, South Carolina", "Old Slave Market At St. Augustine, Florida", "Waitin Fo De End Man" (7 Boys Sitting on a Mule), and "Native Cane Grinders in Sunny Florida".

As each is priced separately (see photos for pricing), please email us stating which item you wish to purchase so that we can customize your order form.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #1065633 (stock #BA794)
Stonegate Antiques
$295.00
Measuring 6 1/4 inches high x 3 3/4 inches wide, this circa 1950's, Japan made, Polka Dot, Mammy String Holder is in very fine condition! Mammy has expected crazing to surface with two very tight hairlines that start at the backside of the piece and feather slightly toward Mammy’s two shoulders about ½ inch. At the lower base of the back is another tight hairline that remains on the back side of the piece only, not extending toward the front of the piece. It rests beside a tiny, darkened, superficial flake which also is not visible when Mammy is placed on a shelf or hung on the wall.

The String Holder is stamped "JAPAN" and “Theo Hinode” on the inside of the base (The Hinode Company is the Japanese Ceramic Company.). Mammy has a hole in the center of her chest area, just above her folded hands, to accommodate the string which would be pulled from the ball of string placed inside her body from the back of the piece. This wonderful piece even comes complete with vintage hanging string---Mammy has two holes at the back of her head to accommodate this! The entire piece is glazed with the exception of Mammy's red kerchief which is cold-painted (meaning that the paint was applied after firing). As such, this area of paint would be the most vulnerable to wear, and Mammy does have some “bald areas” where the paint has come off her kerchief. Please take a moment to view all photos to ascertain condition and appeal of this fabulous and functional, vintage string holder!

A lovely and colorful piece that can be displayed on a shelf or hanging from the wall!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1224383 (stock #BA885)
Stonegate Antiques
$375.00
In the mid-1800's, an unknown artist painted the face of a young Black boy in warm, soft colors, and unbeknown to the artist, forever immortalized the young boy's image! Since that time a variety of items were been produced in the image of the "Young Black boy with the Torn Hat" or "Johnny Griffin".

This circa 1920-30's Johnny Griffin letter opener is constructed in solid brass. It remains functional for such use today or may be simply used as an attractive desk paperweight!

It is in all original condition with delightful patina- not a reproduction- no replaced parts- and measures 10 1/4 inches long. Remnants of green paint are visible on Johnny's shirt. Interestingly, this piece also doubles as an advertising piece as on the reverse side it is impressed, “I. C. Herman + Co., 507-9 Broadway, NY (New York)”.

Johnny Griffin Black Americana collectibles should form the cornerstone of any serious Black Memorabilia collection!

To see all of the Johnny Griffin items currently available for sale, simply type “Johnny Griffin” into the search box on our web home page.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #677830 (stock #BA118/1195)
Stonegate Antiques
$65.00
These three darling, 1940's, Japan-made ashtrays all feature laundry themes with little black children playing among the freshly washed clothing hanging on the clothesline!

All are marked "JAPAN", measure approximately 3 inches in height, have great color and are in excellent condition! Please see photos for detail shots!

As each is priced separately (see photos for pricing), please email us stating which item you wish to purchase so that we can customize your order form.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #383422 (stock #BA473)
Stonegate Antiques
$225.00
An unusual piece, this delightful, cloth Mammy Broom Doll from the 1940's measures 12.5 inches high with a total height of 31 inches including the broom.

Mammy's wonderful, smiling face is all hand-stitched while her clothes are machine sewn. Her blouse is striped cotton, as are Mammy's head, arms, skirt, apron, and cap. Her head, arms, and upper torso have been stuffed with cotton batting. The natural bristle broom fills out both Mammy's torso and skirt & the wooden broom handle extends upward through her neck and head.

Mammy is in all original condition with no mends or repairs. The structural integrity of the broom remains quite sound. Mammy's white cotton apron and cap have been professionally cleaned, removing nearly all traces of old stains, dirt, and dust.

A fabulous piece of vintage Black Americana, and a seldom seen form of the Black Mammy Doll!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1224883 (stock #BA892)
Stonegate Antiques
$495.00
Measuring 12 inches high x 9 3/4 inches long x 6 inches wide, this extraordinarily rare, circa 1920's, Black Americana, wooden pull toy is called Shufflin' Sam!

Demonstrating some degree of age-related paint loss as seen in photos, Shufflin' Sam remains fully functional, shuffling his feet and twirling his blue umbrella when he is gently pulled along a flat surface. His manufacturer is unknown. On his base is written in ink, a very OLD price of $22.00!

The paint loss imperfections do not interfere with the toy's overall charming visual appeal! This exceptional toy has never been repaired or repainted; it remains in all-original condition!

Wooden toys were produced with less frequency than their tin counterparts and also tended to be less hardy, and thus, a far fewer number of them survive today as compared to the more frequently discovered tin and metal toys of the same era.

"Shufflin' Sam" is very RARELY found (The FIRST time I have ever been able to offer him!!!), and the opportunity to acquire him should not be overlooked!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #364916 (stock #BA444)
Stonegate Antiques
$185.00
Measuring 3 /12 inches high x 5 ¼ inches wide x 3 inches deep, this early 1950’s, USA-made, plastic, Yellow Aunt Jemima Recipe Box has seen some use but remains quite visually striking and in very good condition!

Manufactured by FOSTA Products, this highly sought after piece of Black Memorabilia shows some wear to the gold lettered word, “RECIPES”, although the majority of the paint remains intact. Small paint rubs are present here and there on Aunt Jemima’s face as seen in photos. The tiny plastic knob on the left side of the box that acts as a hinge for the cover is missing, but this minor imperfection detracts little from the fabulous color contrast and visual appeal of this delightful and essential, vintage piece of early 50’s Black Americana!

Please see the RED Aunt Jemima Fosta Recipe Box available for purchase separately.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #430442 (stock #BA530)
Stonegate Antiques
$225.00
Measuring just 10 inches in height, this diminutive, vintage 1940's, Mammy Bottle Doll is in near mint condition, with nicely detailed clothing and a very darling face!

Her cute face is composed of pearl button eyes with red fabric mouth. She wears a flowered bandanna and a pale blue apron over her pale blue patterned dress. Her clothes are odor and stain free and are nicely constructed--note fancy sleeve detail!

Just love her size!!! Odor-free---- ready to be displayed in your collection!! She is one of 3 offered bottle dolls all coming from the same estate--and all priced separately.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1371023 (stock #BA936)
Stonegate Antiques
$195.00
Measuring 15.5 inches long, this delightful, folk-art styled, cloth and stocking-constructed rag doll was made circa 1920's.

Detailing in construction sets this sweet black doll apart! Her creation was very carefully executed through a combination of hand and machine stitching. She was lovingly dressed in machine-stitched clothing made from old red, pink, cream and rose-patterned scraps of cloth, while her body was hand-sewn and constructed of old, black stockings stuffed with cotton batting.

This young girl's nose and mouth are hand-embroidered, while her eyes are represented by small, black buttons. Her hand-applied and stitched hair is made of black wool yarn and has been fashioned into braided pigtails edged with faded red ribbon bows with fluffy bangs topping her forehead. Her hands are carefully hand-stitched to delineate fingers.

This sweetie is in near perfect condition with the exception of some fading to her clothing as well as two age-related, small holes to her stocking-constructed left foot and lower leg. (This wear and fading to the fabrics and stockings used in her construction may well be the very reason they were used, as they may have been discarded from personal use. Please refer to photos to view wear.)

Purchased in Charleston, South Carolina. Simply full of charm with lovely touches! A quite difficult-to-find-in-this condition, 90+-year-old, cloth rag doll!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #1209250 (stock #BA859)
Stonegate Antiques
$965.00
De-accessioned from the inventory of the ill-fated Middle Passage Museum (see museum history below), this very unusual, 19th century, estate document from Sumter County, Georgia is offered for sale, the purpose of which was to itemize and execute a division of property from the estate of the deceased, southern, plantation owner.

This is a partial document missing its beginning and end pages, therefore, the name of the deceased slave owner and the date of the document is not known. HOWEVER, the document remains EXTRAORDINARILY RARE AND UNUSUAL as it proceeds to, first, categorize the 40 slaves using the word SLAVES instead of Negroes, and secondly, proceeds to list the male slaves BY NAME, ALONG WITH NAMES OF THEIR WIVES AND THEIR CHILDREN, with monetary value listed in the right column of the document!!!! In two instances, the number of years married is also listed! Children are labeled "Girl, "Boy", or "Infant". Total value of these 40 slaves was calculated at $24,200.00

Such documents listing ENTIRE SLAVE FAMILIES BY NAME is simply not found, as slaves were viewed as property, not individuals with rights and privileges who had wives and children, the whole of which, constituted a family. It would indeed be a phenomenal piece of history to be able to identify the plantation and/or deceased slave owner as such an estate listing speaks to an uncommon, albeit, rare and unique perspective of slave ownership. Such a listing makes this particular document all the more heart-wrenching, and it certainly begs the very sad question of whether or not these slave families were allowed to remain united and intact once the final estate disposition was conducted.

The document measures approximately 8 1/2 inches wide x 14 1/8 inches long, is double-sided and is in good condition, with fold lines evident along with some age-related foxing at top and bottom fold lines. 1 3/4 tear along the fold line of the top fold at right edge. The ink color is sepia toned (likely as a result of some fading over time) on a pale blue, vertically-ruled, heavy paper. This phenomenal piece of cultural ephemera is ready for appropriate archival preservation/framing.

The listing of slaves is on the back side of the document with the front side listing farm animals, equipment and supplies along with values- "The following property set apart for the use and benefit of the farm".

The Middle Passage Museum was the dream of Jim and Mary Anne Petty of Mississippi as well as that of an anonymous Georgian benefactor who had together compiled a collection of slave artifacts numbering over 15,000 pieces and who had hoped to find a permanent site in Mobile, Alabama, for their museum. While they formed a non-profit organization to raise funds for their hoped-for museum, their dream was never realized.

In a 2003 statement, Jim Petty remarked, "The importance of the exhibit of these artifacts is to understand the harshness of what slavery and segregation was all about. The items in the exhibit remind us of the terrible heinousness of slavery. Viewing the collection can be very emotional, but it is a tool through which we can understand, honor and respect a great culture. We want to realize that out of slavery, a great culture emerged, and carried on, and continued to strive for a better life regardless of the adverse conditions that were placed upon them."

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #961675 (stock #BA775)
Stonegate Antiques
$175.00
Produced as a souvenir piece for the 1884 New Orleans Exposition, this diminutive, antique, metal match holder measures just 2.5 inches high!

Marked "Pat Applied For" on its base, this darling match holder features two small black boys playing around a rather large cotton bale (the bale is labeled "COTTON").

Well-executed detail! A lovely piece seldom found in today's collectible market!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #435278 (stock #BA544)
Stonegate Antiques
$88.00
Black Memorabilia sewing items are becoming very difficult to find! Offered is a wonderful, 1930’s, cloth Mammy Pin Cushion!

While her little body was machine stitched together, the remainder of Mammy is all hand-completed! She has a sweet, cheerful, hand-embroidered face that is framed by a tall red, white and blue bonnet! She continues her patriotic look with a red and white checkered top and blue and white flowered pants---how racy---pants instead of a skirt!!!

Mammy clutches a gold colored tomato which, of course, is designed to keep the sewing pins!

In wonderful condition!! Just waiting to be displayed with other sewing or black American collectibles!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1910 item #333980 (stock #BA374)
Stonegate Antiques
$225.00
Measuring approximately 7 inches high, this most rarely found, circa 1900’s, cloth, Black Mammy doll boasts a body form that is constructed of a dried cob of corn!

Mammy sports hand-stitched facial features, and all original, machine-stitched clothing. Mammy’s hands and arms are made of fabric-coated pipe cleaners allowing for flexibility and movement. Her corn cob body has been neatly encased in muslin. Mammy's costume is complete and quite brightly colored and even features a tiny apron pocket in which a teeny hankie is tucked!

Mammy has been well cared for over the years- no fading to clothing, no rips, tears or other blemishes! A most interesting and very seldom found Mammy doll in utterly excellent condition!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #904409 (stock #BA851)
Stonegate Antiques
$475.00
This rarely found, 1937, tin, wind-up, DOUBLE JITTER-BUG Mechanical Dancing Toy was made by the Buffalo Toy & Tool Works. The Buffalo Toy & Tools Works was located in Buffalo, New York, and was established in 1924.

The toy is in very fine, working condition. When wound, the black dancers bob up and down, moving their hinged legs about and swinging their arms. The dancer's heads, bodies, and arms are constructed of flat tin, while their legs and feet are three dimensional. Other than a few light scratches here and there, the surface lithography and paint is in fabulous condition.

The toy measures 8” tall and 5 ½” wide. Marked with “MADE IN U.S.A.” on the back of the dancer's jackets as well as "MADE IN USA" and "PAT 2072308" (Patent Year 1937) on the bottom of the toy base.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #271729 (stock #BA391)
Stonegate Antiques
$85.00
An interesting and older circa 1940-50's, molded plastic, African female doll carrying a tiny African baby doll in a pouch on her back!

Fine detailing hallmarks this 11.25 inch tall doll. She is dressed in a black native costume -- all handsewn with yellow and black beads, and is adorned with a matching double-strand beaded necklace and single-strand beaded bracelet along with gold hoop earrings. Her lips, as well as the baby's, are painted red and both have inset life-like, plastic eyes. Her hands swivel at the wrists; her arms and legs are jointed at shoulder and hip, respectively.

No identifying marks are evident; clothing is securely attached and could not be easily removed for a further look.

Condition is excellent with the exception of damaged toes on the right foot.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #1303344 (stock #BA927)
Stonegate Antiques
$155.00
Measuring 21 inches in length, this very handsomely attired, gentleman golliwog doll hails from the early 1950's and remains in near pristine condition. Displayed under glass all of these years, his clothing retains good color and is free of soiling with the exception of his white cotton vest which has one small spot on either side that are both nicely concealed when his jacket is set properly in place. (Clothing is removable if the new owner wishes to launder.)

The golly's clothing is machine stitched; his red mouth and white eyeballs are constructed of felt. His body is tightly stuffed with cotton batting allowing him to be displayed either in a sitting position or standing with the support of a doll stand.

A brief history of the Golliwog doll: The Golliwog is based on a Black minstrel doll that the Victorian era illustrator, Florence Kate Upton, born in 1873 of English parents, had played with as a small child in New York. Upton's Golliwog character was first introduced to the world in her 1895 book entitled The Adventures of Two Dutch Dolls. Like the rag doll that inspired it, the Golliwog in her book was an ugly creature with very dark, jet black skin, large white-rimmed eyes, red clown lips, and wild, frizzy hair. Golliwogs are typically male and are generally dressed in a jacket, trousers, bow tie, and stand-up collar in a combination of red, white, blue, black, and occasionally yellow colors.

A very sweet piece!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #383436 (stock #BA474)
Stonegate Antiques
$325.00
Measuring 12 inches in length, this circa 1930’s, Topsy Turvy Doll is in superb condition and is unusually and wonderfully appointed with great attention to detail! Both black and white sides of the doll have been very finely dressed with rose blossoms on their bandannas as well as at their waists- very, very rare for the “Black Topsy” to be so well attired!

”Black Topsy” is dressed in a striking pink, green, orange, and black cotton, geometric-patterned dress- very Art Deco! Her mouth and nostrils are stitched in red thread and she has white pearl button eyes.

The Caucasian doll is dressed in a cotton lavender dress- also with a geometric, Art Deco pattern in black, green and yellow. Her blouse and bandanna are lavender sateen. Her entire face has been finely stitched. She has pink nostrils and mouth, black eyebrows, and her black stitched eyes have pretty lashes that highlight her silvery gray irises! She has the very palest of staining to her face above her nostrils, but it is barely noticeable, and there is some light fading to her sateen bandanna.

Condition and detailing of both sides of this Topsy Turvy is really quite extraordinary, setting her apart from other Topsy’s!! A wonderful addition to one’s doll or Black Memorabilia collection!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #559423 (stock #BA600)
Stonegate Antiques
$350.00
Measuring 6.5 inches long and approximately 4 inches in both width and depth, this wonderfully RARE, Black Americana, Red Cap, Railroad Porter String Holder is in very fine condition with just a sprinkling of white speckling where the black cold paint has worn away.

A stunning and very visually striking piece, it is labeled on back, "Fredericksburg Art Pottery USA", a pottery once located in Fredericksburg, Ohio, manufacturing between 1939-49. The back has 2 original hanging holes for placement on a wall.

Truly in wonderful, vintage condition with no cracks, chips, repairs or repaint! A fabulous addition to one's Black Americana collection!

Please note that the natural outdoor lighting used to photograph this piece has amplified the white paint flecking --the teeny white spots really show up more in these photos than on the actual piece in an indoor setting--- photo number one gives an accurate depiction of appearance.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #1217332 (stock #BA872)
Stonegate Antiques
$1,295.00
Offered are an extraordinary and most rarely-found pair of early 19th century, child/young adolescent - size, Slave Rattle Shackles with one measuring approximately 4.75 inches tall by 7 3/8 inches wide and the other measuring 5.25 inches tall by 7.5 inches wide.

The oddly-shaped, hand-wrought shackles each have two lateral "pockets" that contain pieces of metal or balls that “rattle” as the wearer moves about, thus indicating the wearer's location. This type of shackle is noted in historical references as a Crab Rattler Shackle due to its visual similarity to that sea animal. Each shackle has a pair of small chain links attached at the top. One shackle would have been placed on each leg, and a metal chain would have then been threaded through the attached rings and secured with a lock.

The age of these shackles is formally listed as 19th century, but could very well be older, dating to the last quarter of the 18th century. Condition is quite good given age and use. Please note the small hole present on the side of one shackle as noted in photo. All original and untouched, an utterly horrible, tangible testament to the malevolence of slavery. A VERY RARE form of rattle shackle, even more particularly so due to its small size!

Also currently offered for sale and priced separately is a very diminutive child rattle shackle in an unusual form out of a South Carolina estate. Additionally, de-accessioned from the Middle Passage Museum is an ultra-rare set of 19th Century Slave Ship Shackles from a New Orleans, Louisiana, former slave trader estate! Please type the word "shackles" in the search box on our home page to find all sets of shackles currently being offered.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #326305 (stock #BA927)
Stonegate Antiques
$245.00
Measuring 4.25 inches in diameter, this fabulous, circa 1920’s, metal tip or change tray advertising COTTOLENE shortening is in excellent condition!

The graphic showing an African American woman picking cotton with her little girl at her side retains its vivid coloring and is in near mint condition with only one tiny speck of paint loss at the base of the little girl’s apron. Very minor wear is visible along the front edge of the tray rim as well as along the base edge as seen in photos. Overall condition is quite exceptional!

The front of the tray bears the advertisement, “ The Source of Cottolene- ‘Nature’s Gift From the Sunny South’”, and obviously refers to the cotton plant as the source of Cottolene Lard or shortening which was manufactured by the N.K. Fairbanks Company.

In extraordinarily microscopic-size lettering on the bottom front of the tray at the base of the cotton-picking scene can be read (with a super-magnifying glass), the name of the manufacturer of this metal tip tray: " Passaic Metal Ware Co. Litho. Passaic NJ".

The tray underside depicts a can of Cottolene lard which provides the backdrop for the Fairbanks Company product advertising. It advertising reads, “ ‘Way Down South in the Land of Cotton’ If you could see cotton growing in the fields in all its purity, could observe the skill and care used in extracting and refining the oil, you would appreciate while COTTOLENE- the perfect shortening- is so much purer and more healthful than lard could ever be. COTTOLENE is pure and wholesome as the finest olive oil; makes food palatable, digestible, healthful. COTTOLENE shortens your food- lengthens your life.” Wow, quite a testimony!!

A wonderful crossover piece equally appropriate for one’s Advertising, Black Memorabilia, or Tip Tray collection!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1401924 (stock #BA942)
Stonegate Antiques
$95.00
Measuring approximately 10.5 inches tall, these sweet, hand-made, circa 1930's, Great Depression era, Mammy and Pappy dolls feature dried apples as heads! Common household items such as chicken or turkey breast bones, dried corn cobs, old rubber baby bottle nipples, wooden clothespins and dried fruit were frequently employed to make play-dolls when money was tight and store-bought toys were beyond reach!

These two folk art pieces came straight from the 93 year old great grandma who played with them as a child!

While the heads were constructed from dried apples painted black, the bodies were cut from various pieces of sponge which were then hand-sewn together. Hands were cut from pink--- and not brown or black felt--very interesting---while the teeth were formed from tiny white beads, and the white fuzzy hair fashioned from nothing more than small, cotton batting pieces. Eyes are glued-on googly eyes.

The homemade clothing is nicely constructed via a combination of hand and machine sewing. Mammy's green, teal and rust flowered dress is embellished with a bit of lace at the sleeves, and she also wears a fancy, white eyelet petticoat and a soft pink crocheted shawl. She is barefoot. Pappy's light blue shirt features 3 button detailing, and he wears denim pants and black felt shoes and hat with a red felt vest.

Condition is quite fine with no observable issues! No odors, rips, stains or missing parts. A very sweet pair!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #964506 (stock #BA784)
Stonegate Antiques
$245.00
This vintage 1940's, hand-painted, wooden, Black Bellhop Ash Tray stand has fabulous visual appeal!

Measuring 33 inches tall and 12 inches deep at its maximum depth, the bell hop carries a black tray topped off with a hefty aluminum ashtray. The ashtray is large enough to serve as a receptacle for a smaller potted plant, updating the use of this wonderful sculpture to a modern-day purpose!

The bellhop is quite sturdy as it is constructed of 3/4 inch thick wood, and it is well-balanced, as it is mounted upon a 12 inch diameter wooden base of equal thickness. Condition is wonderful with a great aged patina. At some point long ago, the bell hop lost the front half of his foot, but this loss was cleverly repaired so that it is not readily evident. Also cleverly repaired some many, many years ago, is the bellhop's wrist which appears to have been either broken off or cracked, but which has been nicely repaired and repainted.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1113720 (stock #BA812)
Stonegate Antiques
$95.00
Offered are two, circa 1930's, Made in Japan, ceramic bisque, African-American, baby dolls. A very sweet pair, these dolls measure a diminutive 2.5 and 3.5 inches long. The larger doll is marked "Made in Japan", while the smaller is simply marked "JAPAN".

Both dolls retain their 3 original pigtails, all tied off with tiny pieces of string. Their hand-painted lips and eyes remain in excellent condition as is the dark brown paint which covers the bisque bodies which were originally white when manufactured (the white bisque coloring is visible at the joints).

Both dolls have jointed arms and legs which allow them to assume different positions. The string holding the larger doll's legs in place has stretched over these many years resulting in looser leg joints. (This can be repaired if so desired by the new owner.)

The larger doll is dressed in a hand-made outfit consisting of an ivory, yarn-knitted petticoat under a yellow crocheted dress while the smaller doll remains au naturalle! A darling, teeny tiny pair that display quite nicely!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1266374 (stock #BA916)
Stonegate Antiques
$275.00
Manufactured circa 1920's by the Wurts Creation Company, this scarcely-found, Black Chef, kitchen collectible doubles as both a string holder and a grocery list memo board!

Constructed of painted wood that is nailed and glued together, this vintage collectible retains quite a few of its original but yellowed-with-age grocery shopping list pages. The holder/board retains a ball of string and a stub of an older, red pencil. It also has an inkwell cut-out that would have accommodated a bottle of ink; presumably, an inkwell pen once resided beside it versus the current pencil.

The holder/board remains in all original condition with no repaint or repair. The black chef is not painted on but is a decal--all original. The pale blue paint has appropriate, minor, age-related wear as noted in photos.

Has great visual appeal and displays wonderfully!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #403067 (stock #BA502)
Stonegate Antiques
$495.00
An exceptional example of 19th century Folk Art-- a very rare needlework cross stitch sampler with Black Americana theme! This highly unusual example dates to circa 1880's and depicts two young girls on a primitive, “make-do” seesaw--- a wooden board placed over a log-- complete with a grapevine trellis in the background! This wonderful piece is accented with a multi-toned, Greek Key border design with fringe edging.

The needlework measures approximately 15 by 14 inches and is in good condition overall, given its 120+ years of age! The central design is superb with no problems, but the two upper corners show evidence of some unraveling, particularly the upper right, which has a small hole. This little hole could be repaired, or if the piece was framed, it could be visually eliminated; however, it truly does little to detract from the central focal point of the children on the seesaw, when viewed in its entirety. The piece does show subtle evidence of typical, age-related discoloration.

An utterly wonderful and scarce example of 19th century Black Americana themed Needlework!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #794384 (stock #BA708)
Stonegate Antiques
$245.00
Measuring 6 inches high, this darling, mint condition, Black Memorabilia, pudgy, Little Girl, Bending-Over-Child Nodder was made in 1950’s Japan by the Ardalt China Company. Dressed in just her polka dot panties and shoes, she bends forward peering between her legs at us! Such a darling piece!

The child’s head nods back and forth by pivoting on a tiny metal bar inserted through her neck .

Condition is mint, and the piece is signed on the bottom of her right foot: “Hand Painted Lenwile China Ardalt Japan 6529”.

Black nodders are quite difficult to come by and have become an interesting sub-collecting category in the field of Black Americana! Not to be missed!

Please see the companion matching Ardalt Black Nodder pieces also available (pictured here as well) - the Black Girl Child Nodder and the Black Boy Clown Nodder!!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #365759 (stock #BA527)
Stonegate Antiques
$125.00
Measuring 8 1/2 inches wide x 11 3/4 inches long, this brightly colored, all original, 1930’s era, Little Black Sambo Puzzle by Fern Bisel Peat is in very good condition! This particular puzzle attracts additional interest due to the unusual, geometric, highly angular cut of the individual puzzle pieces- suggesting a very strong Art Deco influence! Additionally, this rendition of Little Black Sambo depicts Sambo with more Asian-like facial features making this puzzle a very unique find!

Ready to be framed, the puzzle has retained all of the brilliance of its original colors and also sports the artist signature of Fern Bisel Peat in the upper right hand corner. Slight and subtle edge wear to some puzzle pieces as noted in photo. A nice addition to one’s Little Black Sambo collection!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #111684 (stock #08HelRid)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Measuring 14" X 23", this vintage, Ca 1930's, "Little Black Sambo" metal game board bears the circular emblem mark of the Wyandotte Toy Company at bottom right, "Wyandotte Toys, Made in USA", attesting to its authenticity as a non-reproduction piece.

Colors are extraordinarily vivid, a fabulous display piece -retains original cardboard backing and original stand, but, alas, no game darts! The darts are extraordinarily rare and are seldom found!

Present are minor surface blemishes, surface scratches, some surface rust specks, as well as minor edge crimps that one would expect of a 90+ year old toy -all of which fail to detract from the fabulously bold visual imagery of this piece! (The most prominent scratch is on Sambo's target.)

To see all of the Little Black Sambo items currently available for sale, simply type “Sambo” into the search box on our website homepage.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #706524 (stock #BA670)
Stonegate Antiques
$75.00
Wonderful vintage 1940s hand-made sewing needle case of a little black girl with yellow bows in her braided hair and a pumpkin colored dress. Front of dress lifts up and there are two flaps for storing sewing needles. Very nicely made with fine detailing to face and hair construction--her little curls are tiny French knots. Excellent condition. Measures 6" long by 3" at the widest.
All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #877763 (stock #BAFolder)
Stonegate Antiques
$50.00
Measuring approximately 4.5 x 6.5 inches, this January 7, 1930, postmarked souvenir postcard folder is entitled, "Souvenir Folder of Dixieland". It was published by Asheville Post Card Company of Asheville, North Carolina.

The folder was mailed, but remains in fine condition given its age. Some edge wear evident at corners. While some photos may appear a bit blurry, this is a function of photography and not condition. All postcards are crisp and clear!

The Real Photo postcard folder features the lyrics of "Dixieland" and 18 full color scenes featuring stereotypical and actual depictions of African-American southern life. Some politically incorrect and derogatory captioning. Scenes depicting the cotton and tobacco industries are also featured.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1253944 (stock #BA905)
Stonegate Antiques
$125.00
Offered for separate purchase are two, RARELY FOUND, salesman sample boxes of Sharpoint Black Face Wire Cobbler's Nails measuring a very diminutive 2" tall x 1.25" wide and 1.75" tall x 1" wide!

The trademark for Sharpoint is a cleverly-designed, eye-catching, broadly smiling image of an African American gent. If one looks closely, one can clearly see the words "Sharpoint Cobblers Nails" printed within the black space of the gent's mouth! A very "sharp" advertising strategy!

Sharpoint Wire Cobbler's Nails were manufactured by the Charles F. Baker Co, Boston, Massachusetts. The smaller box retains its end flap which features both the manufacturing and patent information, with the patent number corresponding to a 1933 USA Patent date. Each box amazingly still retains the original cobbler's nails!

The boxes are in very good condition considering their age and the fact that they held tiny, sharp nails for over 80 years! As stated earlier, the smaller box does retain the end flap which features manufacturing info. The larger box is missing this flap. The cover litho on each box remains very crisp and clear. Typical, age-related edge wear is noted. Please peruse all photos for condition details. The boxes have been shrink-wrapped to protect the integrity of the cardboard, and they do contain the nails.

These VERY, VERY RARELY FOUND SALESMAN SAMPLE size boxes WITH ORIGINAL NAILS are offered at $125 each, or the two boxes can be purchased as a pair for $198.00 firm.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #1037069 (stock #BA790)
Stonegate Antiques
$115.00
Measuring 4 inches in diameter x 2 inches in height, this colorful, French, LeBene wax tin dates to the 1950's. The lithographed tin still contains a bit of wax. It is in very fine condition with some very light superficial rubs and teeny scratches here and there to the surface of the tin. No rust! A very visually-appealing piece that displays quite well with its vivid black and yellow colors contrasting superbly with the background black.
All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #264039 (stock #BA13)
Stonegate Antiques
$325.00
A very RARE and highly appealing Black Memorabilia Advertising Diecut!

Marked "Copyright 1924", in the lower left hand corner, this extremely hard-to-find advertising piece measures 10.5 inches wide x 13.5 inches high. Colorful and visually interesting, the heavy cardboard diecut depicts an engaging Uncle Wabash serenely strumming his banjo on his front porch! Guess the message to the consumer was, "Eat one of Uncle Wabash's cupcakes to experience your own little slice of heaven and serenity!"

Condition of this charming piece of Black Historical ephemera is quite good given its 80+ years of age!! Old water staining to bottom of the diecut does little to detract from the piece. Crease line to one cupcake edge. Appropriate age foxing to back.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1920 item #807810 (stock #BA723)
Stonegate Antiques
$195.00
Measuring a diminutive 4.50 inches long x 2.50 inches high, this very unusual tin and pot metal piece features a small black shoe shine boy with shoe polishing brush in hand, about to polish a giant ladies lace-up shoe!!

The piece has two tiny holes in its bowl suggesting that this was once screwed or fastened into another piece. Logic suggests that perhaps this may have been an advertising display item of some sort.

Remnants of red paint are easily visible on the back of the black boy's hat as well as on his lips, and the giant shoe also displays remnants of black paint. When one looks quite closely, one can see that the entire figure was at one time painted. Some light superficial rusting to the bowl is evident here and there.

Certainly a mystery piece as to purpose, this fascinating Black Memorabilia collectible remains quite intriguing and does reinforce a stereotypical occupation associated with black folk during the unfortunate Jim Crow era.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1910 item #730279 (stock #BA686)
Stonegate Antiques
$28.00
Taken from a battered and unsalvageable 1907 story book, this delightful, hand-colored lithograph drawn by L. Hobbins is entitled, "Teaching Hannah Mariah To Skate".

Measuring 9 by 11 inches framed, this litho retains its vibrant colors!

A delightful piece which features the accompanying text on the reverse side.

The frame is a temporary and inexpensive one to allow the potential buyer to view the story on the backside, but the piece should be properly framed to enable its continued conservation once purchased.

Please ignore any white streaks seen in photos; these are the result of light reflection off of the glass.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #878155 (stock #BA748)
Stonegate Antiques
$65.00
This artisan-made, vintage 1950s, utterly delightful, little Black Boy Hand Puppet is in wonderful, minimally-played-with condition!

This sweet little pop-eyed character was recently acquired from the artist's daughter who stated that her mother made the puppet for her in the late 1950's.

With hands and head constructed of papier mache and a machine-stitched cotton body, this 10.50 inch long puppet sat for years in a doll cabinet seeing minimal childhood play. The body is very lightly soiled from dust with some seam separation at each shoulder (see photo). The hands and head have acquired a bit of a crackled look due to age; however, there are no flakes or missing pieces.

He has a darling "look" and would make a whimsical addition to one's folk art, puppet or doll collection. This hand-made piece is a truly one-of-a-kind creation!