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All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1920 item #1435457 (stock #BA950)
Stonegate Antiques
$125.00
Measuring 2 2/8 inches in diameter x 5/16 of an inch high, this rarely-found, circa 1910’s, dexterity game depicts a wide-eyed, black man wearing a hat, a wide white collar and a big red bow! The puzzle is quite colorful and is very visually appealing! The puzzle contains 5 tiny white balls of unknown material, that, with the proper manual dexterity, are to be placed two in the gent's eyes and the remaining three between the lips as teeth!

Constructed of tin with a cardboard lithographed image and a glass cover, this game has a mirrored back. The puzzle is in all-original condition with the graphic remaining in bright color and free of scratches and abrasions. The glass front is somewhat cloudy, although as one can see in photos, the image is readily visualized. The mirrored back shows significant loss of silvering due to its 110+ years of age. (Please disregard any light or shiny spots in photos which are due to flash reflection off of the glass.)

A delightful piece of early, pocket-toy, Black Memorabilia!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1920 item #1369815 (stock #BA932)
Stonegate Antiques
$55.00
Measuring 5.50" in long x 8" wide, this delightful, C1910 cardboard box once held typewriter ribbons produced by the A.P. Little Company, manufacturer of typewriter ribbons and carbon paper.

The graphics on the cover of this box feature a smiling, happy, young African-American boy (the company's trademark) who is peering through a rip in the paper, unknowingly about to be pounced down upon by a very ugly and venomous-looking spider!

The box is in amazingly near-perfect condition despite its 100+ years of age with very insignificant soiling present as well as rubs and abrasions to box edges, all of which are more than perfectly reasonable given the age of the piece.

A very seldom-seen advertising piece featuring a Black Americana theme! The first that I have had from this company! is in excellent, all-original, perfect condition!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #383436 (stock #BA474)
Stonegate Antiques
$325.00
Measuring 12 inches in length, this circa 1930’s, Topsy Turvy Doll is in superb condition and is unusually and wonderfully appointed with great attention to detail! Both black and white sides of the doll have been very finely dressed with rose blossoms on their bandannas as well as at their waists- very, very rare for the “Black Topsy” to be so well attired!

”Black Topsy” is dressed in a striking pink, green, orange, and black cotton, geometric-patterned dress- very Art Deco! Her mouth and nostrils are stitched in red thread and she has white pearl button eyes.

The Caucasian doll is dressed in a cotton lavender dress- also with a geometric, Art Deco pattern in black, green and yellow. Her blouse and bandanna are lavender sateen. Her entire face has been finely stitched. She has pink nostrils and mouth, black eyebrows, and her black stitched eyes have pretty lashes that highlight her silvery gray irises! She has the very palest of staining to her face above her nostrils, but it is barely noticeable, and there is some light fading to her sateen bandanna.

Condition and detailing of both sides of this Topsy Turvy is really quite extraordinary, setting her apart from other Topsy’s!! A wonderful addition to one’s doll or Black Memorabilia collection!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1910 item #365728 (stock #BA452)
Stonegate Antiques
$325.00
Measuring 11 1/4 inches wide x 14 ¼ inches high, this wonderful, subtly colored, all original, Cream of Wheat puzzle featuring the ever-smiling Rastus holding a scythe in a wheat field is a based upon the 1907 advertising lithograph entitled, “What shall the Harvest be?”

The character of Rastus was based on an actual person- a black waiter from Chicago- who was paid $5 for the use of his image by Colonel Mapes, the General Manager of the Nabisco Company, the owner of Cream of Wheat. The company began using the waiter’s image in the early 1900’s, replacing the original woodcut of a black chef that appeared on the packaging from 1894 until that time. Interestingly from a social and historical perspective, the depiction of the ever-pleasant, always-smiling Rastus was both a subtle yet positive departure from the extremely derogatory advertising much more typical of the era- advertising that nearly always featured blacks with wildly contorted and exaggerated features most often in very undignified poses and predicaments.

This beautiful, rarely-found puzzle, which is in excellent condition, is attractively framed in a hardwood molding colored in walnut, ebony and gold. The puzzle frame is original to the puzzle, and it is contemporary to the production date of the puzzle as it still retains its original wood panel backing, a framing technique not typically found after 1910. The puzzle pieces, themselves, are very finely and delicately cut, and are of a much smaller size than what is typically found in puzzles dating from the 1920’s and beyond.

A phenomenal piece that would be a centerpiece to any serious Black Americana, Advertising, or Cream of Wheat collection!

PLEASE NOTE: Any discoloration, white spots, or other unnatural variances in color are due to the unavoidable light reflections caused by the glass in the framing. The presence of the glass made photography quite a challenge!

A note to collectors: vintage Black Memorabilia puzzles from the pre-WWII era are a VERY rare find. Many were given out as "premiums" for utilizing a given product, and did not stand the test of time. Happy collecting!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1437139 (stock #BA951BA952)
Stonegate Antiques
$295.00
Measuring 9 inches high, these delightful examples of Folk Art styling, are two of a series of Black cloth character dolls made in Alabama in the 1930’s by unknown craftsmen/women.

It has been noted that their creation was encouraged through President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's Depression era program, the Work Projects Administration (WPA), in existence from 1935-1943. The WPA was designed to provide jobs across the country during the Great Depression. While most jobs were in construction and infrastructure, the most well-known project arm of the WPA, known as Federal Project Number One, employed musicians, artists, writers, actors and directors in arts, drama, media, and literacy projects. The five projects assigned to this consortium were: the Federal Writers’ Project (FWP), the Historical Records Survey (HRS), the Federal Theatre Project (FTP), the Federal Music Project (FMP), and the Federal Art Project (FAP). The creation of these dolls fell under the WPA Federal Art Project, with the goal of representing the various aspects of the culture, work and lives of the Southern black community of this time period.

The female doll offered is clad in a red and white checkered, machine-stitched dress topped over with a cream-colored linen apron which evidences some age-related, light soiling. Her apron pocket displays a red and white polka-dotted hankie with a bright, multi-colored head wrap protectively covering her graying hair from dust and grime while she completes household chores. Her outfit is fully completed with a cream-colored linen chemise and pantaloons and black leather shoes. Even though she is working at chores, brass-toned double hoop earrings beautifully grace her hand-stitched facial features. (All of the WPA black dolls produced for this project share identical hand-stitched facial features.) She holds her wicker-straw broom in her right hand but appears to have misplaced her tin pail for hauling swept up debris, which should be resting on her left arm.

Characteristic of this type of doll is a small square of asphalt shingle glued to the feet to serve as a stand. The doll's body is well-stuffed with cotton batting and rests sturdily on its stand, allowing the doll to freely stand upright. In light of the missing debris pail, she is priced at $245 vs $295 for her male, chicken-toting companion.

The gray-hair and bearded, chicken-toting black country gent doll is also attired in machine-stitched clothing and additionally shares a cotton-batting stuffed body, embroidered facial features, black leather shoes, and an asphalt shingle tile stand. He wears blue cotton britches with red suspenders along with a blue and cream striped cotton shirt and a red kerchief around his neck. His hat is constructed of black-colored felt. This country gent holds a very finely-crafted and detailed brown chicken under his right arm, while his left hand clutches a wooden walking stick. Note the lustrous chicken feathers protruding under his arm when he is viewed from the back.

Two very special dolls that represent a snapshot of history, capturing the lives of poor southern black folk of the Depression era.

As previously described, the female doll is priced at priced at $245.00 and her male companion at $295.00.

Please note: the male fisherman appearing in the photographs has been sold.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #1437065 (stock #B277)
Stonegate Antiques
$375.00
Presented as a historical and cultural artifact, this seldom-found, vintage, 1942, Ten Little Colored Boys book illustrated by Emery I. Gondor and published by Howell, Soskin Publishers, New York, is in very fine condition.

Measuring 10.75 inches wide x 8.25 inches long, the book has seen extremely gentle use as evidenced by the near perfect condition of the little boys' heads which, while providing visual interest, are primarily present to allow easy turning of each page. Given this purpose, it is quite remarkable that only the last three heads have prominent creasing with one of the three also showing a half inch vertical tear at the top on the head (no missing pieces). Front and back covers are constructed of heavy cardboard, the pages of heavier stock paper. Both the front and back boards evidence minor corner and edge wear along with minor soiling from handling. the front cover has a tiny 1/4 inch long tear at the binding, about 1 1/2 inches down from the top of the book.

The book retains its brilliant, bright, crayon-box-like colors. The book has ten pages with alternating color and black and white illustrations as noted in photos. I did not have sufficient space to post photos of all pages, but those present are representative of overall condition. Pages evidence some minor of age-discoloration, soiling and/or foxing, but all pages are free of rips and creases. The binding is tight and the book retains its original, red, binding spiral.

Originally published in 1868 under the Title of “The Ten Little Indians,” this poem was used during minstrel shows, which oftentimes were traveling acts, performed by white actors in blackface following the Civil War. The following year, the poem was adapted to this overtly horrid, racist rendition, replacing the word Indians with “Nigger” in both minstrel shows, printed sheet music, and children’s nursery rhyme books. This version married the stereotypes of violence and ignorance within the African-American population with the intent of "villain-izing" freed black males while simultaneously allowing violent acts to befall the black characters portrayed in the rhyme.

This 1942 version having changed the derogatory term nigger to that of colored (equally derogatory), also depicts a somewhat tempered portrayal of the violence befalling the characters as compared to earlier versions of the rhyme.

The poem:
Ten little colored boys sitting in a line; one slid off the roof, then there were nine.
Nine little colored boys fished with worms for bait; one fell in the river, then there were eight.
Eight little colored boys flying up to heaven; one tried to parachute, then there were seven.
Seven little colored boys doing circus tricks; one teased an elephant, then there were six.
Six little colored boys found honey in a hive; one tried to pet a bee, then there were five.
Five little colored boys heard a lion roar; One didn't run in time, then there were four.
Four little colored boys started out to ski; One hit a snowman, then there were three.
Three little colored boys cooked some chicken stew; One ate the pot-ful, then there were two.
Two little colored boys playing with a gun; Thought it wasn't loaded, then there was one.
One little colored boy thought it would be fun to settle down and marry, then there was none.
He had a family of colored boys and then, before very long, there were ten of them again.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #334052 (stock #BA31)
Stonegate Antiques
$18.00
Measuring approximately 3 1/4 inches long x 2 1/4 inch wide x 1 1/8 inches deep, this vintage, sweetly depicted, steam-molded Brown Doll Face from the 1930’s has never been used! Eyes and lips are both hand-painted; condition is quite fine with no stains, tears, or discoloration—ready to be used!
All Items : Traditional Collectibles : Books : Bindings : History : Pre 1900 item #113528 (stock #B132)
Stonegate Antiques
$145.00
The book, THOMPSON IN AFRICA or AN ACCOUNT OF THE MISSIONARY LABORS, SUFFERINGS, TRAVELS, AND OBSERVATIONS is the compilation of the journal kept by missionary George Thompson while working at the Mendi Mission in Sierra Leone, Africa, during the period 1848-1851. This is a second edition published in 1852, printed for the author by William Harned, 48 Beekman Street, New York City (the first edition was published in 1851).

George Thompson’s missionary service to Africa occurs approximately 7 years after the MENDI natives of the AMISTAD were accompanied by missionaries on their return to Africa. He serves this very same mission, now in the of colony Sierra Leone, a colony which was established to serve as refuge for the liberated Africans taken from slave ships. 356 pages long, this journal provides a fascinating account of all aspects of the Mendi culture seen through the eyes, however biased in his mission to convert the Africans to Christianity, of a genuinely well-meaning gentleman of his time. Condition: complete, tight binding, foxing throughout, spine wear as shown in picture.

Thompson states, “It is hoped that the following narrative may, in the hands of GOD, awaken a desire in many hearts to go to Africa, for the purposes of preaching, teaching, farming, building houses, mills, manufactories, etc., and thus assist in making long despised and neglected AFRICA, what it is capable of becoming, THE GARDEN OF THE WORLD.”

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1910 item #192615 (stock #BA305)
Stonegate Antiques
$95.00
Measuring 3.25 inches X 4 inches, this early 1900's, Glass Magic Lantern Slide is in pristine condition!

Featuring wonderful, vivid colors, this slide is titled "Two Old Chums" on the paper label attached to the back of the slide. The slide depicts an older black gentleman standing, hat in hand, beside a seated, very despondent-looking, white gentleman- who appears to have been drinking.

The slide has wonderful detailing--In particular, please note the print of a Black Child playing the Banjo which hangs on the wall at the far right side of the room!

Very hard to find Black Memorabilia in fabulous condition!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1920 item #807810 (stock #BA723)
Stonegate Antiques
$175.00
Measuring a diminutive 4.50 inches long x 2.50 inches high, this very unusual tin and pot metal piece features a small black shoe shine boy with shoe polishing brush in hand, about to polish a giant ladies lace-up shoe!!

The piece has two tiny holes in its bowl suggesting that this was once screwed or fastened into another piece. Logic suggests that perhaps this may have been an advertising display item of some sort.

Remnants of red paint are easily visible on the back of the black boy's hat as well as on his lips, and the giant shoe also displays remnants of black paint. When one looks quite closely, one can see that the entire figure was at one time painted. Some light superficial rusting to the bowl is evident here and there.

Certainly a mystery piece as to purpose, this fascinating Black Memorabilia collectible remains quite intriguing and does reinforce a stereotypical occupation associated with black folk during the unfortunate Jim Crow era.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #706869 (stock #BA672)
Stonegate Antiques
$95.00
Measuring only 2.75 inches high, this darling 1920's Black Memorabilia souvenir piece is in amazing condition considering its delicate, sea shell construction.

A tiny bisque black boy holding a watermelon slice is seated on a throne of sea shells. The name of the location that this sea shell souvenir was meant to commemorate is worn and is no longer readable.

Two very minor chips are present as shown in photos which do not detract from the beauty of this piece!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1910 item #1157155 (stock #BA833)
Stonegate Antiques
$450.00
Having conceived of the revolutionary idea of a lithographed, molded-mask doll face in 1901, New Yorker, Albert Bruckner applied for and was awarded the patent for his idea that same year. All Bruckner dolls were then stamped, "PAT'D JULY 8th 1901" on the lower right neck edge.

From 1901-1924, Bruckner produced this original, 12" Topsy Turvy doll for Horsman's Babyland Rag Doll line that features Caucasian, "Betty", on one end and African American, "Topsy", on the other. The inspiration for this doll is based on the character of Topsy in Harriet Beecher Stowe's classic 1852 novel, "Uncle Tom's Cabin".

The Bruckner Topsy Turvy doll was advertised in a 1907 Babyland Rag Doll catalog as follows:

"TOPSY-TURVY---What is this?
Looks like just a pretty miss.
But turn her over and you'll find,
She is quite another kind.
First she's White and then she's Black,
Turn her over and turn her back.
Topsy that side--Betty this--
Yet complete, each little Miss."

The detail on this hard to find classic doll is lovely. Both heads indeed have the pressed, molded mask faces with lithographed features. Topsy's face is in mint condition! Betty's face is also in excellent condition with no superficial rubs to the flesh-toned coating of her mask; her lithographed facial features remain just beautiful!! (Such rubs are not unexpected as these particular doll masks are, unfortunately, very prone to rubbing. To find one of these 100+ year old dolls without such rubbing is quite rare!)

Grinning Topsy has red bows tied to her black mohair braided pigtails which are tucked into her red headscarf. Her red blouse, which matches her head scarf, is trimmed with cream banding around the sleeve and neck edges. The cream scarf she wears around her shoulders tucks into her very full, red/cream checked, gingham skirt. Topsy’s cream banding is lightly soiled and there is also some subtle fading to her red head scarf, most notably in the back. Flip her over, and....

Betty's more subtle Anglo face and her hair are lithographed. She wears the same red/cream checked gingham fabric of which both her dress and ruffled bonnet are constructed. Over her very full gingham dress, Betty should also wear a sheer, ruffled, white pinafore, however, it has been lost over time. Betty’s cream banding around each sleeve is also lightly soiled as are her hands.

Both dolls have the typical "mitten" hands of the stuffed rag dolls of this era. There are no other difficulties to report other than some tiny, stray (original) glue spots here and there. No rips, tears, or odors, and she has been stored in a smoke-free home. The 1901 Patent Bruckner Topsy Turvy doll typically carries a $650+ dollar price tag, but deductions to price have been levied to account for the minor imperfections that are noted in this doll.

The photos show it all- these two girls are a charming pair! A very difficult to find doll in such wonderful condition!

Also offered for sale is a COMPLETE 1901 Patent Bruckner Topsy Turvy doll with absolutely no soiling or fading. To view, simply type Bruckner into the SEARCH box on our homepage.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #861198 (stock #BA286)
Stonegate Antiques
$60.00
Offered are a group of ten, Black Memorabilia postcards in wonderful, unused condition of 1930's through 1950's vintage, priced at $60.00 for the group of ten.

While some photos may appear a bit blurry, this is a function of photography and not condition. All postcards are crisp and clear! The two comical cartoon postcards are much more brightly and vividly colored than the photos depict. The eight photo postcards also feature titles describing their subjects.

A delightful grouping that would be much-appreciated framed!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Contemporary item #1445689 (stock #G694)
Stonegate Antiques
$495.00
This extremely colorful, lighthearted, and energetic, signed, fine quality, Limited Edition, giclee print depicts a lively outdoor dining scene full of gaiety and camaraderie.

The image, itself, measures 32" long x 24" wide, while the framed artwork in total measures 41" long x 32.5" wide. The giclee print was framed using museum-quality, acid-free double-mat board and backing materials, within a fine quality solid wood frame and topped with non-glare glass. This artwork was purchased directly from artist, Kelvin W. Henderson, it was signed by him at the time of our purchase, and it cheerily hung in our dining room for ten years!

The artwork is actually brighter in color than my camera was able to capture- closeups appear a bit "darker" than reality. Condition is absolutely perfect! And its presence---well, it will command one's attention hanging on an entire wall-space all by itself! It is, as stated earlier, a Limited Edition giclee lithograph-- Number 18 of a 150 Limited Edition series, with an additional 50 canvas editions. The provenance of this piece with all details is attached on the back side of the artwork as seen in one of our photos. A buoyant and effervescent piece of art!

As this piece exceeds typical shipping criteria in terms of dimensional size and weight, we regret that we cannot offer free shipping. We will provide a $25 shipping credit, but the remaining cost of shipping will rest upon the purchaser.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1450996 (stock #B304)
Stonegate Antiques
$95.00
Published in 1926 by the Whitman Publishing Company of Racine, Wisconsin, this very seldom-found, little softcover book measuring just 4x5 inches, offers a very unique continuation of the original Little Black Sambo story!

Entitled A New Story of Little Black Sambo, this tale picks up the story with Little Sambo's mother, Black Mumbo, exclaiming that Sambo, after almost losing his best Sunday clothes to the tigers, would- from now on- only be allowed to wear his every day clothes. Now very unhappily dressed in only a grass skirt, a pouting and naughty Sambo decides to run off into the jungle once again without permission, and climbs a tree to gather coconuts. A tiger soon arrives threatening to eat Little Black Sambo, trapping him up in the tree for the entire day! Eventually, Tusker the Elephant arrives, successfully chasing off the tiger and saving Sambo. Sambo then returns home, where an angry Black Mumbo spanks him with a hairbrush for running off, despite the gift of coconuts Sambo hoped would appease his mother. The conclusion of the tale then moves forward one month later when the family goes to visit Little Black Sambo’s cousins, the Bimboes, who admire his fine Sunday best clothing that he was finally allowed to wear again!

Although no author is attributed, it is thought by some that the tale was co-authored by the book's two illustrators, Clara Bell Thurston, who rendered all of the lovely colored drawings and Earnest Vetsch, who rendered the "black and white" illustrations (which, actually, are done in navy blue ink) as well as the fancy hand-lettering of the text which further embellishes the book.

With 36 unnumbered pages which alternate between the superbly rendered color and navy blue line illustrations, this unique little book is in quite good condition. No fading of color, no rips, creases or missing pages. Binding is tight with all three original staples present. Cover edges are subtly worn, and age-related, light soiling is present. Tusker the elephant has been lightly colored with colored pencil in some places as is Sambo's grass hut, and evidence of penciled-in page numbers, long since erased, is noted. (Any blurring in photos is due to camera technique and does not reflect book condition.)

This rarely found continuation of the original Little Black Sambo story is a must have addition for the collector of Little Black Sambo books!

To see all of the Little Black Sambo items currently available for sale, simply type “Sambo” into the search box on our website homepage.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #930447 (stock #BA763)
Stonegate Antiques
$195.00
Measuring just under 2 inches high, this cast iron, Black, Uncle Sam pencil sharpener was made in Occupied Japan in 1948. In wonderful condition with very minor paint loss due to light use, this piece is stamped on the backside of Uncle Sam's head: "Made in Occupied Japan".

A wonderful and rarely found piece of Black Americana!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #1166268 (stock #BA835)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Offered is a VERY difficult to find, Mammy or Aunt Jemima ceramic Clothes Sprinkler Bottle measuring 7" tall. My references indicate that she was made in Japan in the 1950's. She is in absolutely PERFECT CONDITION (no chips, cracks, breaks or repaint) and is complete with her original rubber and metal sprinkler stopper! Clearly, she was never actually filled with water and used to sprinkle water on wrinkled clothing prior to ironing!

Mammy or Aunt Jemima is wearing a white dress and head scarf with red trim. Her dark brown skin is flawless (any white spots or marks seen in photos are the result of light reflection and do not represent flaws of any kind.)

While she is unmarked, there is a very small black "X" on the bottom of the backside of her dress.

An incredibly hard to find piece! These very functional pieces were, more often than not, actually used in the home on ironing day, and thus were subject to damage or breakage and ended up in pieces at the local landfill! This wonderful Black American collectible was acquired from the original owner where it rested safely on a display shelf all these many years!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #365750 (stock #BA454)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Measuring 10 1/2 inches wide x 13 3/4 inches long, this brightly colored, all original, uncut paper doll entitled “Dottie Darling’s Little Friend Sunny Sammy ” published in the March 1934 edition of Pictorial Review is in excellent condition! Designed by Corinne Pauli Waterall, this sweet paper doll set was one of a series, with this one featuring sweet-faced, Sunny Sammy’s Black Mammy Nurse, Diana!

Protected in an antique gold wooden frame, this magazine sheet has retained all of the brilliance of its original patriotic colors- red, white, and blue, making it a rather striking piece of wall art-perhaps for the nursery! Seldom located in such fine condition!

PLEASE NOTE: Any discoloration, white spots, or other unnatural variances in color are due to the unavoidable light reflections caused by the glass in the framing. The presence of the glass made photography quite a challenge!