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All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #271729 (stock #BA391)
Stonegate Antiques
$85.00
An interesting and older circa 1940-50's, molded plastic, African female doll carrying a tiny African baby doll in a pouch on her back!

Fine detailing hallmarks this 11.25 inch tall doll. She is dressed in a black native costume -- all handsewn with yellow and black beads, and is adorned with a matching double-strand beaded necklace and single-strand beaded bracelet along with gold hoop earrings. Her lips, as well as the baby's, are painted red and both have inset life-like, plastic eyes. Her hands swivel at the wrists; her arms and legs are jointed at shoulder and hip, respectively.

No identifying marks are evident; clothing is securely attached and could not be easily removed for a further look.

Condition is excellent with the exception of damaged toes on the right foot.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 2000 item #451878 (stock #BA560)
Stonegate Antiques
$75.00
Offered is an authentic signed baseball from former Negro League player CLIFFORD LAYTON. The ball was signed for me at an autograph show and is dated 4-15-05.

Mr. Layton was a skilled pitcher with a strong bat who had a four-year career in the Negro Leagues, playing for the Indianapolis Clowns, the New York Black Yankees and the Raleigh Tigers. One of his teammates was a promising infielder by the name of Hank Aaron, who signed with the Boston Braves in 1952, and eventually became a Hall of Famer. Layton received an invitation in 1951 to try out for the Brooklyn Dodgers, but by then his shoulder was troubling him so he declined, hoping it would heal and another opportunity would present, which unfortunately never came. As of 2016, Mr. Layton, at the age of 87, was enjoying retirement as an associate pastor in a North Carolina ministry.

A brief history of the Negro League:

African-Americans first began to play baseball in the late 1800s on military teams, college teams, and company teams, eventually finding their way to the established professional baseball teams of white players. However, racism and “Jim Crow” laws would force African-Americans from these teams by 1900, with black players left to form their own teams.

In 1920, an organized league structure was formed under the guidance of Andrew “Rube” Foster, a former player, manager, and owner for the Chicago American Giants. In a meeting held at the Paseo YMCA in Kansas City, Mo., Foster and several other Midwestern team owners joined to form the Negro National League. Soon, rival leagues formed in Eastern and Southern states, which brought black baseball to major urban centers and to rural countrysides in the U.S., Canada, and Latin America. The Leagues maintained a high level of professional skill and inspired economic development in many black communities.

In 1945, when Major League Baseball’s Brooklyn Dodgers recruited Jackie Robinson from the Kansas City Monarchs, Robinson became the first African-American in the modern era to play on a Major League roster. While this historic event was a key moment in baseball and civil rights history, it marked the decline of the Negro Leagues. The best black players began to be recruited for the Major Leagues with their black fans following them, and the last Negro Leagues teams folded in the early 1960s.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #1449092 (stock #BA961)
Stonegate Antiques
$155.00
Measuring 8.25 inches long, this vintage, Black Mammy Spoon rest was made in JAPAN in the 1950's. Along with its jolly, wide-eyed caricature, the spoon rest features a purple-colored tulip painted on both sides and reads “SPOONREST” in black lettering at the top of the Mammy's polka-dotted, purple headscarf. Note small "hanging hole" in back for display on the kitchen wall!

Very few of these pieces survive due to the high level of use they encountered. This piece has obviously not seen much if any use as the paint remains absolutely perfect! A single, very minor, very tight age crack is present at the outer edge of the handle bottom. Two superficial craze lines noted: one at the base of the right-side tulip, the second noted at the "R" in "SPOONREST". No other imperfections.

This fine and very hard-to-find piece of Black Memorabilia is an essential addition for the advanced collector! Fabulous detailing!!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1437176 (stock #BA953)
Stonegate Antiques
$1,275.00
Measuring 26.5" long x 13.75" wide, this fabulous, one-of-a-kind segregation sign is felt to be circa 1930s.

The sign with its flat black background, features a decorative free-hand, skill-fully executed, corner-looped edge design in old white paint advertising: SLEEPING ROOM FOR RENT.

Beneath the words 'FOR RENT', the words "WHITE ONLY" have been covered over with a layer of similar-colored background paint. Both words are still visible beneath this layer of paint with the word "WHITE" being most readily visualized.

I believe that this "paint-over" can be easily, professionally removed, and I toyed with the idea of having this done, but then felt that I should offer the sign as it is in its current state, as it is reflective of a small yet positive progression in history, in the viewpoint of at least this proprietor in our society in this time period. What prompted this change of viewpoint, which obviously occurred decades before the Civil Rights Act of 1964, is forever lost to history. The place of origin of this sign is unknown.

The sign is hand-painted on Masonite, a smooth-faced, compressed wood hardboard that was invented in the 1920s and was in popular use during the Depression-ridden 1930s due to its relatively inexpensive price tag. The sign has nine holes to facilitate hanging: three on each end and three down the center of the sign. The sign retains an original surface patina with age-related crackling to the lettering. In addition to the words "White Only" being painted over, a decorative flourish centered between the words "Sleeping Room" and "For Rent" has also been painted over, reason unknown. Mild surface paint loss, scuff-marks, and edge wear are present, commensurate with a 90+year old sign.

An exquisite example of Segregation Era signage that tells a story of prejudice evolving to an acceptance of equality.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1150519 (stock #BA827)
Stonegate Antiques
$125.00
Measuring 1 7/8 inches in diameter x 1/4 of an inch high, this seldom-found, circa 1920’s, dexterity game depicts a surprised or startled African baby. Likely German-made, the puzzle has no markings. It contains the 3 tiny metal balls, that with the proper manual dexterity, are to be placed in the baby’s mouth and two eyes. Two of the balls are currently fixed in place, likely due to the metal backing being very subtly pushed in.

Constructed of tin with tin back and a cardboard lithographed image and a glass cover, the puzzle is in all-original condition with some tiny crimps to the edges as noted in photos. (Please disregard any light or shiny spots in photos which are due to flash reflection off of the glass.)

An interesting image and a delightful piece of early Black Memorabilia!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #383422 (stock #BA473)
Stonegate Antiques
$225.00
An unusual piece, this delightful, cloth Mammy Broom Doll from the 1940's measures 12.5 inches high with a total height of 31 inches including the broom.

Mammy's wonderful, smiling face is all hand-stitched while her clothes are machine sewn. Her blouse is striped cotton, as are Mammy's head, arms, skirt, apron, and cap. Her head, arms, and upper torso have been stuffed with cotton batting. The natural bristle broom fills out both Mammy's torso and skirt & the wooden broom handle extends upward through her neck and head.

Mammy is in all original condition with no mends or repairs. The structural integrity of the broom remains quite sound. Mammy's white cotton apron and cap have been professionally cleaned, removing nearly all traces of old stains, dirt, and dust.

A fabulous piece of vintage Black Americana, and a seldom seen form of the Black Mammy Doll!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #264104 (stock #BA388)
Stonegate Antiques
$195.00
The resplendent colors of this vintage, 1940's, all-hand-stitched, wool felt tote bag with rolled hand straps are pure eye candy!

This never-used tote bears the original paper tag which states, "Handmade by African Cripple; Ematupeni / Zimele Cripple Care Centers; Durban, England".

The artistry of the wool felt, hand-appliqued cut-outs featuring a mother and her three children is further enhanced by colorful bead work which was carefully placed for symmetry in design and form! A gorgeous piece of vintage African Artwork!

Measuring 14 long x 14 wide x 2 deep, the bag retains a "brand-new" appearance with no fading, rips, stains, or other blemishes.

Please see the companion "tea cozy" offered for sale and priced separately.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #383442 (stock #BA484)
Stonegate Antiques
$165.00
Measuring 5 3/4 x 7 3/4, this lovely, early, Pre-WWI, English or Continental origin, Black subject advertising die cut features two sweet, smiling, pretty young girls under a tattered umbrella.

This pleasant die cut is in excellent condition and comes protected in an attractive, walnut-tone decorative frame! Likely originally produced to advertise a specific, product, store or location, but then was never utilized for that purpose.

A sweet piece, perhaps, one-of-a-kind!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1910 item #730279 (stock #BA686)
Stonegate Antiques
$45.00
Salvaged from a battered and heavily damaged 1907 story book, this delightful, hand-colored lithograph drawn by L. Hobbins is entitled, "Teaching Hannah Mariah To Skate".

Measuring 9 by 11 inches framed, this litho retains its vibrant colors! A delightful piece which features the accompanying poem on the reverse side.

The frame is a temporary and inexpensive one to allow the potential buyer to view the poem on the backside, but the piece should be properly framed to enable its continued conservation once purchased.

A note: It IS possible to frame this 110+ year old piece using glass on both sides to allow perpetual view of the poem.

Please ignore any white streaks or marks seen in photos; these are the result of light reflection off of the glass.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1273763 (stock #BA922)
Stonegate Antiques
$395.00
Measuring 7.5 inches long x 10 inches high, this rarely-found, circa 1930's, wooden pull toy depicting a Smiling Black Boy is fully functional! He was manufactured by Wood Commodities Corporation, New York, and was called, not the typical Sambo as one might expect, but "Little Jasper"!

Little Jasper was created by George Pal, a cartoonist who worked for Paramount Studios and who created the Puppetoons, a popular cartoon series played in movie theaters of the era prior to the screening of the feature film.

Push or pull him along, and he twirls around while the two present wooden flowers spin along with him! (One wooden flower top is, unfortunately, missing--the only imperfection to this fabulous toy!)

Overall condition is rated as excellent, barely-used condition! There is very insignificant edge wear to paint here and there, but the four wheels don't show even the tiniest trace of wear from use, suggesting that this toy quite likely sat either in a display cabinet or was packed away for its entire existence! Even the original, paper manufacturing sticker remains intact and in pristine condition!

"Little Jasper" is very RARELY found, and the opportunity to acquire him should not be overlooked!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1482685 (stock #BA996ABC)
Stonegate Antiques
$85.00
This charming grouping of THREE vintage, wooden, Black Railroad Porter and Mammy clothes brushes were all made in the 1930's by the Rhody Brush Company of Woonsocket, Rhode Island.

The two larger brushes have natural bristles, while the small red Mammy has solid red "plastic" brushes. They range in height from the Mammy at 6.5 inches and the Railroad Porter at 8 inches tall, to the smaller Mammy at 4.5 inches tall.

The two larger brushes are priced at $85 each. The small red 4.5" Mammy, is priced at $60.

All three brushes are in very good condition with evidence of having been very lightly used as described below:

Red Railroad Porter(A): small, superficial "dings" to paint here and there, with three teeny specks between the eyes. The majority of paint wear is seen around the bottom of the pedestal that the porter is standing on. The brush bristles are a mix of faint red and natural coloring.

Small Red Mammy(C): paint in excellent condition with only one superficial ding to the paint on her left side. An unusual feature: the black bow painted atop her hat!

Large Green Mammy(B): --paint in very good condition with tiny dings here and there and subtle paint wear to her hat on the right side. Slight bend to bristles, likely due to storage conditions at some point in time. Has a bit of faded green string around her neck which once may have been tied into a bow.

Please note that many of the white spots seen in the photos are light reflections and are NOT areas of missing paint. If one looks closely, the teeny areas of missing paint can be distinguished from the light reflections.

Enter "BRUSH" into the SEARCH BOX to find other Black Americana brushes for sale.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1910 item #1475900 (stock #BA387)
Stonegate Antiques
$35.00
Offered are five different, circa 1890-1901, Jim Crow era, stereoview cards, highlighting African-American history at the turn of the 20th century, some 120+ years ago. They feature: grueling rice field labor in South Carolina, a slave market in St. Augustine, Florida, a group of Florida sugar cane grinders, five English Springer Spaniels at U.S. Field Dog Trails being held at bay by a young black man, and seven very young black children seated on a mule awaiting orders for work in the fields.

The stereoview cards are titled: "Hoeing Rice, South Carolina", "Old Slave Market At St. Augustine, Florida", "Native Cane Grinders in Sunny Florida", "Who said quail?" (young man holding English Springer Spaniels) and "Waitin Fo De End Man" (7 Boys Sitting on a Mule).

The cards are priced at $35.00 each or all five cards for $140.00. All are in fine condition, and all but "Waitin Fo De End Man" and "Who said quail?" have a detailed, historical description on the reverse side.

As each is priced separately as stated, please specify which stereoview card(s) you wish to purchase so that we can customize your order form.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #1127725 (stock #BA824)
Stonegate Antiques
$75.00
Measuring 3 3/4 inches long, this circa 1920s, miniature, Black Mammy doll is unique in construction- its head and body have been fashioned from an old black rubber baby nursing nipple!

This Mammy nipple doll is more unusual and less seldom found because she holds a tiny, plastic, white baby in her left arm. Typically when found, the Mammy nipple doll has empty arms.

Mammy’s sweet little face has been hand-painted, and she has been nicely dressed in a red and white polka dot dress with linen apron and red flowered head scarf. The little baby wears a linen gown edged with lace and has a molded face.

Condition of this wonderful miniature Mammy is very good! With the exception of her nipple face which has contorted a bit due to the ravages of time, she is in delightful condition!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1910 item #385670 (stock #BA497)
Stonegate Antiques
$295.00
This extremely rare, circa 1900, COMPLETE set of 4 Magic Lantern glass slides with Black Americana theme is in mint condition! True to the era in which they were produced, these 4 slides typify the black derogatory stereotypes prolific during this period.

Measuring 4 inches wide x 3 3/4 inches high, the black color-toned set was manufactured by A.D. Handy, Stereopticon & Supplies, Boston.

The four slides tell the story, through drawings and southern black dialogue, of a black boy attempting to steal a watermelon (slide 1). Four other black boys hiding behind a fence and watching, spook him, making the boy think there is a ghost behind him (slide 2)! Dropping the watermelon in fright, he dashes off for safety (slide 3). The shattered watermelon is then left on the ground, already broken into bite-sized pieces for the 4 other boys to enjoy!

This offering is truly an exceptionally scarce Black Americana collectible!!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #924045 (stock #BA760)
Stonegate Antiques
$295.00
Measuring 33 inches long x 15 inches high, this vintage 1869, black ink, original lithograph was published as an art supplement to Appleton's Journal.

The litho was executed by John Karst with his signature appearing in the lower left hand corner. Highly detailed, the litho reproduces a bustling New Orleans' dock scene featuring numerous slaves at work.

This litho was professionally re-framed using museum-quality, acid-free materials in 2004. The frame is a classic styled, black painted, beaded, hardwood accented with a dark rose, acid-free mat.

A fascinating glimpse into life on the docks of the Mississippi River at New Orleans!

Please note that any white spots or streaking appearing in photos are the result of light reflection and are not damage to the litho.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1920 item #793291 (stock #BA695)
Stonegate Antiques
$595.00
Measuring 6.25 inches long x 5 inches wide, this rarely found and well detailed, circa 1910, brass ashtray depicts a smiling black male native reclining on a stylized seashell.

In fabulous condition with 100+ years of all original surface patina, this phenomenal piece is very highly detailed and displays wonderfully! It authentically depicts the highly fashionable Art Nouveau styling which was so wildly popular at the turn of the 20th century. This brass ashtray promotes the English settlement of the CONGO on the African continent, and thus, the words "CONGO" are impressed across the native's chest. The earliest version of this ashtray was crafted in BRONZE did not feature the Congo label across the native's chest.

A must-have piece for the sophisticated Black Americana collection!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1480317 (stock #BA874.951)
Stonegate Antiques
$295.00
Measuring 9 inches high, these delightful examples of Folk Art styling represent three of a series of Black cloth character dolls made in Alabama in the 1930’s by unknown craftsmen/women employed under President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's (FDR) Depression era program, the Work Projects Administration (WPA), in existence from 1935-1943.

The Work Projects Administration was designed to provide jobs across the country during the Great Depression when hundreds of thousands were out of work. While most WPA jobs were in construction and infrastructure, the most well-known project arm of the WPA, known as Federal Project Number One, employed musicians, artists, writers, actors and directors in arts, drama, media, and literacy projects. The five projects assigned to this consortium were: the Federal Writers’ Project (FWP), the Historical Records Survey (HRS), the Federal Theatre Project (FTP), the Federal Music Project (FMP), and the Federal Art Project (FAP).

The creation of these fabulous dolls fell under the WPA Federal Art Project, with the goal of representing and preserving the various aspects of the culture, work and lives of the Southern black community of this time period. All of the WPA black folk dolls produced for this project were placed on asphalt shingle stands, they all feature elderly folk, they all share black leather shoes, a cotton-batting stuffed body, and identical hand-stitched facial features, with subtle and unique variations in expression around the eyes due to the clever positioning of the eyebrows!

The gray-hair and bearded, chicken-toting black country gent on the left is attired in machine-stitched clothing wearing blue cotton britches with red suspenders along with a blue and cream striped cotton shirt and a red kerchief around his neck. His hat is constructed of navy blue-colored felt. This country gent holds a very finely-crafted and detailed brown chicken under his left arm, while his right hand clutches a wooden walking stick. Note the lustrous chicken feathers protruding under his arm when he is viewed from the back. He appears to be a bit disgruntled about something given those raised eyebrows!

The female doll depicts a lady out for a stroll with her black umbrella in hand. This sweet gentlewoman wears a red and white polka dot kerchief on her head covering most of her gray hair and has embroidered facial features. Her head is turned to her right as if to see who had just called out her name. This gentlewoman's clothing, with the exception of her neutral-striped knit-fabric sweater, is machine-sewn cotton with careful detailing right down to the red hankie poking out of her apron pocket. topping off her outfit are a pair of gold hoop earrings!

The gray-hair, bearded, chicken-toting black country gent doll on the right, is also attired in machine-stitched clothing wearing brown cotton britches with a patch on the left leg, and a bright red hankie protruding from the right pocket. His matching brown suspenders along with a red and cream striped cotton shirt and a red kerchief around his neck complete his outfit, while his brown felt hat tops it all off. This country gent also holds a very finely-crafted and detailed brown fabric chicken with lustrous feathers under his left arm, while his right hand clutches a wooden walking stick. This gent, however, is in much finer spirits than his male companion is, wearing a very pleasant expression on his face!

Three very special dolls, which today, are becoming very, very difficult to find, representing a snapshot of history, capturing the lives of poor southern black folk of the Depression era! All three in perfect condition and priced at $295.00 each.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #1476095 (stock #BA989)
Stonegate Antiques
$245.00
Offered is a colorful, 1883, lithographed, Lime Kiln Club, Black Americana, Cigar Label by Mensing & Stecher of Rochester, New York (company noted in the lower left corner). The lithographed 8" x 6" label would have been placed on the inside cover of the traditional wooden cigar box of that era. This highly detailed label features a caricature image of a very boisterous group of African Americans at a lodge meeting. The moderator is trying to get order while some of the members talk and fight amongst themselves with one even holding a pistol.

A trademark label affixed to the bottom of a sour mash whiskey barrel, "ICMCo" stands for the Ithaca (New York) Cigar Manufacturing Co. for whom the label was made.

Interestingly, this cigar label was based on a racial parody book featuring a fictitious fraternal organization of African-Americans, titled 'Brother Gardner's Lime-Kiln Club' by "M. Quad". Quad, in actuality, was noted newspaper columnist and satirist, Charles Bertrand Lewis, of the Detroit Free Press.

Framed in an 8.75" x 10.75" silver-toned wood frame, this Lime Kiln Club lithographed label is extraordinarily scarce and highly sought after. It is listed as one of the top 100 blue chip cigar labels by "InStone 100" (a cigar label rating organization). The lower right hand corner notes the US Patent Office Registry date of May 22nd 1883. This 19th century piece would benefit from professional framing using archival, acid-free materials to enhance its life for many more years to come.

Condition: The color remains as brilliant as the day this 140 year old label was produced! Four unobtrusive and minor tears are noted: two in the lower left corner area, one at the center top near the moderator's gavel, and one between the K and I in Kiln. A crease is noted in the white margin above the label title, and a water mark is present in the lower right side of the white margin. However, none of these blemishes detract from this highly intricate lithograph! Take a few moments to carefully study all of the activity and detailing in this colorful piece!