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All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1405035 (stock #BA947)
Stonegate Antiques
$275.00
Offered is an extraordinarily rare, 1930's, Googly-Eyed Tea Pot made in Japan. A Google search on this item yields NO other vintage, 1930s Japan, Mammy, Googly-eyed Teapots available, further attesting to this piece's rarity!

This particular piece is in very fine condition, with cold-paint flaking on the spout and lid edge decoration noted as this piece's only readily-visualized flaws. (Cold paint refers to paint applied AFTER a piece has been painted, glazed, and fired in a kiln. Because this after-paint is not glazed and fired, it is easily subjected to flaking and disintegration.)

The teapot remains in fabulous, all-original condition with its twisted-wire, original, bail handle intact and in fine condition. The tea pot measures 5.5 inches wide from the edge of its spout and across the body to the opposite side. With its handle upright, the pot measures 7.75 inches tall. The teapot with lid, absent the handle, measures 5.25 inches tall. It is 5.75 inches wide.

As noted previously, the teapot spout presents flaking of its green paint, with two tiny flea bites present on the tip of the spout detected only via touch versus the eye. The pot has no chips, cracks, repairs or repaint. There are very teeny surface rubs on the left cheek, but these are paint flaws which occurred prior to glaze application and firing. There are also two teeny "dots"-- one on the forehead and one just to the inside corner of the right eye that are also flaws created either right before or during firing.

This fabulously RARE piece displays just wonderfully and would be a prized asset in the collection of any advanced collector! And its diminutive size makes it easy for one to display in one's collection!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1930 item #383460 (stock #BA483)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Used by the Atlantic and Pacific Tea Company, New York, - the A & P grocery store chain - for advertising purposes, this rarely-found and sizable die cut has been protected in a 12 3/4 x 9 1/2 inch, gold-toned frame.

Vividly colored, this Black Memorabilia themed piece features a smiling black girl seated on a large straw basket while holding 2, smaller-sized, flower-filled straw baskets in each arm. The young girl is nicely attired in a ruffled blue and yellow dress and wears red sandals, white lacy gloves, and a rose-accented, straw bonnet!

The die cut is in excellent condition! A very rare find!

All Items : Traditional Collectibles : Books : Bindings : History : Pre 1900 item #113528 (stock #B132)
Stonegate Antiques
$165.00
The book, THOMPSON IN AFRICA or AN ACCOUNT OF THE MISSIONARY LABORS, SUFFERINGS, TRAVELS, AND OBSERVATIONS is the compilation of the journal kept by missionary George Thompson while working at the Mendi Mission in Sierra Leone, Africa, during the period 1848-1851. This is a second edition published in 1852, printed for the author by William Harned, 48 Beekman Street, New York City (the first edition was published in 1851).

George Thompson’s missionary service to Africa occurs approximately 7 years after the MENDI natives of the AMISTAD were accompanied by missionaries on their return to Africa. He serves this very same mission, now in the of colony Sierra Leone, a colony which was established to serve as refuge for the liberated Africans taken from slave ships.

356 pages long, this journal provides a fascinating account of all aspects of the Mendi culture seen through the eyes, however biased in his mission to convert the Africans to Christianity, of a genuinely well-meaning gentleman of his time. Condition: complete, tight binding, foxing throughout, spine wear as shown in picture.

Thompson states, “It is hoped that the following narrative may, in the hands of GOD, awaken a desire in many hearts to go to Africa, for the purposes of preaching, teaching, farming, building houses, mills, manufactories, etc., and thus assist in making long despised and neglected AFRICA, what it is capable of becoming, THE GARDEN OF THE WORLD.”

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #383436 (stock #BA474)
Stonegate Antiques
$325.00
Measuring 12 inches in length, this circa 1930’s, Topsy Turvy Doll is in superb condition and is unusually and wonderfully appointed with great attention to detail! Both black and white sides of the doll have been very finely dressed with rose blossoms on their bandannas as well as at their waists- very, very rare for the “Black Topsy” to be so well attired!

”Black Topsy” is dressed in a striking pink, green, orange, and black cotton, geometric-patterned dress- very Art Deco! Her mouth and nostrils are stitched in red thread and she has white pearl button eyes.

The Caucasian doll is dressed in a cotton lavender dress- also with a geometric, Art Deco pattern in black, green and yellow. Her blouse and bandanna are lavender sateen. Her entire face has been finely stitched. She has pink nostrils and mouth, black eyebrows, and her black stitched eyes have pretty lashes that highlight her silvery gray irises! She has the very palest of staining to her face above her nostrils, but it is barely noticeable, and there is some light fading to her sateen bandanna.

Condition and detailing of both sides of this Topsy Turvy is really quite extraordinary, setting her apart from other Topsy’s!! A wonderful addition to one’s doll or Black Memorabilia collection!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #878155 (stock #BA748)
Stonegate Antiques
$65.00
This artisan-made, vintage 1950s, utterly delightful, little Black Boy Hand Puppet is in wonderful, minimally-played-with condition!

This sweet little pop-eyed character was recently acquired from the artist's daughter who stated that her mother made the puppet for her in the late 1950's.

With hands and head constructed of papier mache and a machine-stitched cotton body, this 10.50 inch long puppet sat for years in a doll cabinet seeing minimal childhood play. The body is very lightly soiled from dust with some seam separation at each shoulder (see photo). The hands and head have acquired a bit of a crackled look due to age; however, there are no flakes or missing pieces.

He has a darling "look" and would make a whimsical addition to one's folk art, puppet or doll collection. This hand-made piece is a truly one-of-a-kind creation!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #283921 (stock #BA402)
Stonegate Antiques
$395.00
This handsome Black Memorabilia Male Golliwogg doll comes straight from an English home!

A brief history of the Golliwog doll: The Golliwog is based on a Black minstrel doll that the Victorian era illustrator, Florence Kate Upton, born in 1873 of English parents, had played with as a small child in New York. Upton's Golliwog character was first introduced to the world in her 1895 book entitled The Adventures of Two Dutch Dolls. Like the rag doll that inspired it, the Golliwog in her book was an ugly creature with very dark, jet black skin, large white-rimmed eyes, red clown lips, and wild, frizzy hair. Golliwogs are typically male and are generally dressed in a jacket, trousers, bow tie, and stand-up collar in a combination of red, white, blue, black, and occasionally yellow colors.

Measuring 21.5 inches long, this delightful and appealing cloth Golli is unmarked and is thought, by his original and quite elderly owner, to have been made in the mid 1940's! (She speculates that he could even be a bit older than that, but she remembers not acquiring him until after the end of WWII.)

His nose and mouth are hand-stitched and he has round, cloth covered button eyes- the pupils were hand-colored using black ink! His nicely coiffed, black hair appears to have been styled from soft, "stuffed animal-type" fur! Rather interesting and ingenious! He has a machine-stitched, cotton batting stuffed, black sock cloth body. His colorful wardrobe is also machine stitched- green wool mourning coat, gold vest, and red and white polka-dotted cotton pants and matching bow tie!

He is in wonderful condition with the exception of some tiny moth holes to the back of his mourning coat (see photos) as well as another tiny moth hole to the back of his right arm and back right pants leg. The polka dot clothing shows the slightest hint of fading. His dark black fur hair also shows some age-related color change to brown at the roots. Hmm...then again...perhaps he's simply overdue for another hair coloring appointment at the Salon!

A very sweet addition to one's Black Memorabilia or Golliwogg collection!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1900 item #1459667 (stock #BA966)
Stonegate Antiques
$1,195.00
Offered is an extraordinarily rare, 1844, Warren County, Georgia, ARREST WARRANT for a SLAVE girl named Ally who is accused of drowning two young (Caucasian) girls in Sweetwater Creek, Georgia. The girls aged 7 and 10, were daughters of Thomas Roney, who filed the charge. The slave girl, Ally, is owned by Nancy Mayhamry (?SP), but was in the possession of Thomas Roney at the time of the drownings.

The single page, 16" x 25" document was folded in half by its author, and the charge is written out on one side of the folded page (see photos). The folded page was then flipped over, folded into fourths, and the title of the charge was written out: "Warrant of Slave girl Ally Crime of Murder "Tho. Roney (?)Pros(?)".

The text of the charge reads as follows, Paragraph one:
"Georgia Warren County"
"Before me Elisha Burson as Justice of the peace for Said County personally came before me Thomas Roney who being duly Sworn Saith that, he had Just reason to believe and verify doth believed that a negro girl by the name of Ally, hired by, and in the possession of Said Thomas, and the property of Nancy Mayhamry, did on Sunday afternoon twelfth last in Said County in Sweetwater Creek, feloniously and willfully drown two of his children, to wit, two daughters, one ten years old, the other seven years old - Sworn and Subscribed to before me May 30th, 1844" - (signed) Elisha C Burson J.P. (signed) Tho. Roney

Paragraph Two:
"Georgia Warren County"
"To any lawful officer to execute and return - Whereas Thomas Roney hath this day made complaint before me on oath, that he hath just reason to believe and verify doth believed that a negro girl by the name of Ally, hired by, and in the possession of Said Thomas, and the property of Mary Mayhamry, did on Sunday afternoon twelfth last- in Said County in Sweetwater creek, feloniously and willfully drown two of his children, to wit, two daughters one ten years old, the other Seven years old - This was therefore to command you, to apprehend this Said negro girl Ally, and bring her before me that she may be dealt with as the law directs - here of fail not - - - In testimony whereof I have hereunto Set my hand and Seal, May 30th, 1844" - - - (signed) Elisha C Burson J.P. S.S.--(the S.S. encircled perhaps to signify his Seal)

Condition of this very, very unique slavery document is quite fine given its 178 years of age. Expected aging of paper with insignificant and minor tears at creases and tiny areas of soiling. (see photos)

Truly an extraordinarily rare historical document that defines a specific slave-related incident.

One has to wonder what became of Ally? Was she ever caught? If so, she was likely put to death. But was she innocent or guilty? Because she was a slave, it, heinously, did not matter as she would be allowed no voice...

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1960 item #560825 (stock #BA620)
Stonegate Antiques
$95.00
Measuring approximately 16 inches long, this wonderful, vintage 1950's, cloth Mammy Laundry bag is in wonderful condition! This bag features a curved wooden band at the base of the bag which allowed the bag to retain its form.

All cloth and done in a great, red paisley fabric, this darling Black Mammy bag features an interesting, smiling face! Due to its small size, this bag would have held undies or stockings or also may have been placed on one's bed and used to hold one's nightie during the day!

Very sweet and displays nicely!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #793094 (stock #BA692)
Stonegate Antiques
$495.00
Measuring approximately 11 inches tall, this wonderful, vintage 1940s, Black Americana Chef cookie jar, remains in all original condition-- no repairs or repaint-- and it is NOT a reproduction!

This wonderful piece is unmarked but is documented in numerous guides as the Black Chef cookie jar made in the 1940's by the National Silver Company. It likely once had a "NASCO" foil label on its base which dried up and fell off over the course of the jar's lifetime.

Fabulous cobalt blue accenting makes this cookie jar quite striking in its appearance. A great display piece!

As stated, the cookie jar remains in all original condition-- a rarity for a cookie jar of this vintage! Please take the time to view all photos as they represent condition quite nicely. Glaze crazing typical to the age of this 60+ year old piece is evident as well as small surface flakes present here and there along lid cover edge- a very common site for flakes/chips on any lidded ceramic piece given that the lid was continually taken on and off during use and thus easily subject to damage. A single superficial hairline occurring during firing can be seen on the interior base; it does not go through to the exterior.

It is quite rare to find a vintage cookie jar in such fine overall condition! Reproductions abound on today's market, but authentic pieces such as this are quite scarce and are truly collecting treasures when discovered!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #930447 (stock #BA763)
Stonegate Antiques
$195.00
Measuring just under 2 inches high, this cast iron, Black, Uncle Sam pencil sharpener was made in Occupied Japan in 1948. In wonderful condition with very minor paint loss due to light use, this piece is stamped on the backside of Uncle Sam's head: "Made in Occupied Japan".

A wonderful and rarely found piece of Black Americana!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1920 item #807580 (stock #BA720)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Offered is this extremely RARE 1920's, cardboard, D.L. Clark Company, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 120 count, BLACK JACK Caramel "PENNY CANDY" BOX which features a singing Black Dandy strumming a banjo.

Cardboard candy boxes with black themes remain EXTREMELY RARE finds in today's market!!!

The piece is in very fine condition with expected edge and corner wear. The top left seam of the cover has split but otherwise, the box remains intact with no missing pieces.

D. L. Clark Company History:

David L. Clark (1864-1939) was born in Ireland and came to America when he was eight years old. He entered the candy business working for a small manufacturer in New York. After three years as a salesman, he bought a wagon, horses and merchandise, and went into business for himself.

The D. L. Clark Company was founded in 1886 when Clark started manufacturing candy in two back rooms of a small house in Pittsburgh's North Side. He began selling his candy in the streets of Pittsburgh. During his lifetime, his company became a leading candy manufacturer.

By 1920, the D. L. Clark Company was making about 150 different types of candy, including several five-cent bars, specialty items and bulk candy. Clark was also manufacturing chewing gum in a building across the street from his candy factory. In 1921, they incorporated Clark Brothers Chewing Gum Company as a separate business.

By 1931, the candy bar business was so expansive that Clark decided to sell the gum company, and it was renamed the Clark Gum Company.

The D. L. Clark Company remained in the hands of the Clark family until it was sold in 1955 to the Beatrice Food Company who operated the company until 1983 when in turn, it was sold to the Pittsburgh Food and Beverage Company. In 1995, the Pittsburgh Food and Beverage was thrown into bankruptcy. The company was shut down for several months and its assets divested. Restructured as Clark Bar America, the company operated until May of 1999, when it was purchased by New England Confectionery Company (NECCO), the oldest candy manufacturer in the United States.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1303190 (stock #BA926, BA101)
Stonegate Antiques
$245.00
Offered are two, circa 1930's, Japan, colorfully decorated, Black Americana Tea Pots in pristine condition! A darling and diminutive, novelty elephant piece with riding black native completes the trio! All three elephants proudly point their trunks upward, awarding "Good Luck" (according to superstition) to anyone who displays them (or drinks their tea)!

Cleverly designed, the elephants themselves, serve as the body of each tea pot, while the turbaned Black Natives lift off the elephants' backs revealing their function as tea pot lids. A wicker handle facilitates handling on the two large tea pots. The base of all three pieces are marked "JAPAN".

The largest tea pot measures 7 inches high by 8 inches long; the middle-sized tea pot measures 6 inches high by 7 inches long; the tiny novelty piece measures a diminutive 3.25 inches long by 2.75 inches high.

Condition is excellent on all three pieces with the exception of the wicker handle on the middle-sized tea pot. One end of the handle is missing its looped section of the wicker that would have wrapped around the ceramic loop to secure the handle to the tea pot. As is noted in the photos, that end of the handle can be propped against the ceramic loop to maintain its proper appearance for display purposes.

Handsome and difficult-to-find pieces of vintage Black Memorabilia! All three Good Luck Elephant pieces are offered as a single group, priced at $245.00!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #383446 (stock #BA482)
Stonegate Antiques
$145.00
Measuring 7 1/2 x 9 1/2, this lovely, 1920-30's, English or Continental origin, Black subject die cut features a very pretty, smiling young woman in a straw bonnet with unknown book in hand.

This die cut was manufactured to advertise a specific item, store or location but was never used for that purpose or otherwise personalized. Likely, this vintage advertising piece was discovered and then framed so that it could be enjoyed despite its anonymity.

This pleasant die cut is in excellent condition and comes protected in an attractive, walnut-tone, oval decorative frame! The frame bears some minor veneer loss that does not impact the frame integrity, nor is it immediately noticeable.

A sweet piece!

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1950 item #674199 (stock #BA653)
Stonegate Antiques
$150.00
Measuring just 4.5" wide x 5.5" long, this very rarely found, circa 1940's, metal mechanical toy features the beloved Golliwogg character!

Unmarked, this toy is in very good condition with tiny superficial surface scratches wherever metal rubs metal during toy movement. To operate the toy, one simply squeezes the metal lever on the back, which causes the clown to hit poor Golly on the head with a mallet!

A brief history of the Golliwog doll: The Golliwog is based on a Black minstrel doll that the Victorian era illustrator, Florence Kate Upton, born in 1873, had played with as a small child in New York. Upton's Golliwog character was first introduced to the world in her 1895 book entitled The Adventures of Two Dutch Dolls. Like the rag doll that inspired it, the Golliwog in her book was an ugly creature with very dark, jet black skin, large white-rimmed eyes, red clown lips, and wild, frizzy hair. Golliwogs are typically male and are generally dressed in a jacket, trousers, bow tie, and stand-up collar in a combination of red, white, blue, black, and occasionally yellow colors.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1940 item #1459873 (stock #B306)
Stonegate Antiques
$75.00
Offered is the 1935, 2nd edition of Helen Bannerman's, original Little Black Sambo story, along with five additional and delightful Little Black Sambo stories by noted author and illustrator Frank Ver Beck. Published by the Platt & Munk Company of New York which was renown for hiring highly talented artists and illustrators, all of whom contributed to the company's reputation for publishing exquisitely illustrated children's books.

The first story is the much-beloved children's classic written and illustrated in the early 1900's by Englishwoman, Helen Bannerman, for her two daughters while they lived in India. Sambo, in the original Bannerman tale, was an Indian boy and not an African-American child. He was converted to this race overtime, however, by subsequent story tellers and illustrators. This age-old tale tells of Little Black Sambo and his frightening tiger encounter, which fortunately, has a happy ending!

The five stories written and illustrated by Frank Ver Beck which follow Helen Bannerman's original tale, all feature Little Black Sambo and his encounters with a variety of different animals, from a Baby Elephant and a Tiger Kitten, to Monkeys, Bears and Crocodiles! Each of Ver Beck's tales were originally published as individual mini-size books, which today, are extremely difficult to come by and quite expensive to acquire if found. Ver Beck's stories are as delightful as Helen Bannerman's original, and publishing them all together in one single volume proved to be a successful marketing strategy for Platt & Munk. His illustrations are detailed and delightful!

De-accessioned from a school library in Bellevue, Washington, this 87 year old book at one point in its lifetime suffered some water damage which is evident in some areas by the fading/partial loss of print and color. It appears to be most concentrated in the lower portions of the pages. The book has been professionally rebound- I would guess, as a result of the water damage -in a bright green patterned wrapper. The rebinding is quite tight like a brand new book, although the binding clearance was misjudged a bit, as it cut off the last one or two letters at the end of words that happen to fall next to the binding on the left side pages only. Right side pages are unaffected. Back end page has remnants of a former library pocket. Two pages with scotch tape repairs, some black marker lines here and there. The book is priced to compensate for its flaws.

To see all of the Little Black Sambo items currently available for sale, simply type “Sambo” into the search box on our website homepage.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1910 item #1445105 (stock #BA959)
Stonegate Antiques
$150.00
Entitled "A Chip O' The Old Block", the theme of this 1906 copyrighted lithograph features a derogatory stereotype not recognized as such when it was published 115 years ago. A very young African American toddler, bare-bottomed and still just crawling, is attempting to catch a fleeing hen - the caption implying, just as would his parent. The great irony here is that the artwork is quite skillfully and beautifully executed.

Measuring 8.5" wide x 6.6" long, the original frame is unusually embellished in the lower left hand corner with a very detailed, three-dimensional image of a wicker baby carriage fashioned from an unidentifiable medium. The carriage is missing part of the handle, part of one carriage wheel, and a teeny bit has also been lost on the upper part of that same wheel, but these missing pieces do little to take away from this embellishment's unique character. This is a unique and interesting piece, indeed!

The lithograph measures 5.5" wide x 3.5" long and is signed "Wall" in the grass under the toddler's left foot. The copyright date, 1906, and the publisher, The Ullman Mfg. Co. of New York, appear in the lower right corner. The original backside paper liner is missing.

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1837 VR item #1459753 (stock #BA967)
Stonegate Antiques
SOLD
Offered is an 1809, Augusta, Georgia, slave document - a Bill of Sale between John Woolfolk of Edgefield District, South Carolina, to Thomas Cumming of Augusta for a total of three slaves, all of whom were related: an adult woman named Judy, who was a seamstress, and her two children, Eliza and Edward.

This document is quite unusual in that it was generally atypical that slave families were permitted to remain together when a slave sale was conducted, regardless of the age of any children involved.

The single page, 15.5" wide x 19" long document was folded in half by its author, and the bill of sale is written out on one side of the folded page (see photos). The folded page was then flipped over, folded into thirds, and the title of the document was written out: "Bill of Sale John Woolfolk, Edgefield District. S.C. (South Carolina) for Judy- a Seamstress Edward (and) Eliza her children".

The text of the Bill of Sale reads as follows, First Paragraph:
"Augusta the 8th June 1809, Received from Thomas Cumming, Six hundred Dollars, being the consideration money infull for the following negro slaves sold and delivered to him this day. Judy a woman of about 21 years old Edward a Boy of about three years old and an infant female, named Eliza, Both Children of the said Woman Judy, which Said three negroes, Judy, Edward and Eliza, I do hereby warrant and defend against the claims of all persons whomsoever"

Second Paragraph:
"Given under my hand and seal the day and date first above written."
"John Woolfolk"

Condition of this slavery document is quite remarkable given its 213 years of age! Expected age-related discoloration of paper and slight (approx 3/4 inch)paper split at one end of one fold only. (see photos)

All Items : Popular Collectibles : Memorabilia : Black Americana : Pre 1910 item #1466758 (stock #B311)
Stonegate Antiques
$175.00
Written by the author of "The Story of Little Black Sambo", Englishwoman, Helen Bannerman's publication of "The Story of Little Black Mingo" followed shortly thereafter, this time, featuring a brave and ingenuous female heroine. Little Mingo, with the help of a friendly mongoose, manages to outsmart both her guardian, an evil old woman who cares nothing for her, and a voracious alligator plotting to devour her! The story ends with Mingo and the mongoose living happily ever after in a nice little house by the riverside.

Helen Bannerman was inspired to write these stories for her two young daughters while the family lived in India; Mingo and Sambo were Indian children and not African-American. They were converted over time to this race, however, by subsequent story tellers and illustrators.

A mini book measuring 4" x 5.75", this cloth-bound hardcover was published by Frederick A. Stokes Company, New York, with 64 pages of vividly colored illustrations, and no copyright date. Research indicates this version was published circa 1902.

Condition is a 9 out of 10! This 120+ year old book has seen little use with just a teeny bit of wear to book edge points and age-related staining with some minor paper loss to the original, overlay-ed paper cover. Some soiling to interior pages here and there, but otherwise, intact and tight with no tears, creases, pen/pencil markings! Amazing condition for a book of this age!

A simply wonderful story, truly a fairy tale of sorts, that is seldom found in this lovely, original, early edition! To see the Little Black Sambo items currently available for sale, simply type “Sambo” into the search box on our website homepage.